Law School Discussion

KURDS TO THE RESCUE: as mediators and US ally...

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KURDS TO THE RESCUE: as mediators and US ally...
« on: March 27, 2006, 07:35:52 PM »
let us not underestimate the KURDS...to do so would be foolish.

assyrian international news agency...

North Iraq -- Like most young Kurds in this northern city, Asad Ali does not speak Arabic. He has heard about the rising wave of sectarian killings down in Baghdad, but it seems a world away from the quiet rhythms of daily life here in Kurdistan.

So when a discussion broke out near an outdoor book market about whether there would be civil war between Shiite and Sunni Arabs in Iraq, Ali, a 24-year-old who wears rimless glasses and blue jeans, did not hesitate to give his opinion.

"It is beautiful that our enemies are killing each other," he said with a grim chuckle.

It is not an unusual view here. Kurdistan may be part of Iraq in the legal sense, but most Kurds view the Arabs, whether Sunni or Shiite, as foreign oppressors. The fact that the Arabs are now fighting among themselves evokes little sympathy.

For many Kurds, the main danger of a civil war is that it might spread northward, threatening the relative stability they have enjoyed since the US invasion in 2003. Although Kurdistan is virtually an ethnic monolith, the major cities on its borders, Kirkuk and Mosul, have substantial Arab populations and are far more violent.

So the prospect of a civil war makes many Kurds yearn all the more fiercely for separate national status. Some even say such a war might help them make their case.

"I think the violence down in Baghdad will lead Kurdistan to independence," said Muhsin Khidir, 30, who was taking a cigarette break near the booksellers. "We don't want that kind of fighting here. If civil war breaks out in Iraq, I'm sure we will have the support of the international community, and we'll just declare ourselves independent."

Older Kurds, who came of age before Kurdistan became an autonomous region in 1991, tend to be more worried about the violence in central Iraq, and more hopeful that their own political leaders can play a mediating role. But they too wonder whether a broader conflict might have accidental benefits.

"I don't like to get my rights in the tragedy of others," said Asos Hardi, 43, a journalist who helped found Hawlati, Kurdistan's main independent newspaper. "But if it will happen and Iraq will become a second Afghanistan, why should we continue with them? It is a logical question."

Kurdistan had its own civil war in the 1990s, when its two main political parties fought for control. Many Kurds do not want to become involved in another war. They are also deeply resentful of Iraqi Arabs, who carried out brutal attacks on Kurdish villages during the reign of former president Saddam Hussein.

Evidence of that animosity can be found almost anywhere. At the outdoor book market -- which sits under a vast mural of Sheik Mahmoud al-Hafeed, the rebel leader who is considered the father of modern Kurdistan -- one of the most popular titles is a paperback called The Bloody History of the Arabs: A Summary. On its cover was a lurid color illustration of a hooded skeleton strangling a beautiful young woman.

But separating from Iraq would be difficult, if not impossible. Apart from any objections the Arabs might raise, Turkey has at least 12 million Kurds within its borders, and has made clear that it would not tolerate an independent Kurdistan. Iran and Syria have Kurdish populations, too, and would probably also object.

New York Times

Julie Fern

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Re: KURDS as mediators and US ally...
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2006, 09:04:29 PM »
hey, maybe we can have another war!

kurds = turds.

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Re: KURDS as mediators and US ally...
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2006, 09:17:54 PM »
how degenerative is a  person who claims that they are against a war yet will stand back and let genocide progress...and then scoff at the liberated people as if they are inconsequential...

a coward and a hypocrite.


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Re: KURDS as mediators and US ally...
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2006, 09:18:43 PM »
kurds in northern iraq say that justice is being served for the man who has harmed them for decades...new york-based human rights watch groups...after a three-year investigation...and gathered iraqi documents...forensic examination of several mass graves...and hundreds of eyewitness accounts, concludes of the hussein regime 1988 campaign...

survivors tell stories that add up to war crimes....5000 kurds murdered in one order...

so...aye guess these people don't matter to some posters?


Julie Fern

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Re: KURDS as mediators and US ally...
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2006, 09:19:08 PM »
not any more...than...others who dying...guess they...not...matter to you.

dip...*&^%.

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Re: KURDS as mediators and US ally...
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2006, 09:25:41 PM »
face it...you are a hypocrite.

humans all bleed blood...you are making a distinction.


Julie Fern

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Re: KURDS as mediators and US ally...
« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2006, 09:26:29 PM »
yes.  you big dipshit, rest of us not.

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Re: KURDS as mediators and US ally...
« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2006, 10:34:57 PM »
and you are the degenerate hypocrite who think some people matter more than others...











you fail to see that the kurds could be the key to this.

Fidelio

Re: KURDS as mediators and US ally...
« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2006, 06:54:40 AM »
let us not underestimate the KURDS...to do so would be foolish.

assyrian international news agency...

North Iraq -- Like most young Kurds in this northern city, Asad Ali does not speak Arabic. He has heard about the rising wave of sectarian killings down in Baghdad, but it seems a world away from the quiet rhythms of daily life here in Kurdistan.

So when a discussion broke out near an outdoor book market about whether there would be civil war between Shiite and Sunni Arabs in Iraq, Ali, a 24-year-old who wears rimless glasses and blue jeans, did not hesitate to give his opinion.

"It is beautiful that our enemies are killing each other," he said with a grim chuckle.

It is not an unusual view here. Kurdistan may be part of Iraq in the legal sense, but most Kurds view the Arabs, whether Sunni or Shiite, as foreign oppressors. The fact that the Arabs are now fighting among themselves evokes little sympathy.

For many Kurds, the main danger of a civil war is that it might spread northward, threatening the relative stability they have enjoyed since the US invasion in 2003. Although Kurdistan is virtually an ethnic monolith, the major cities on its borders, Kirkuk and Mosul, have substantial Arab populations and are far more violent.

So the prospect of a civil war makes many Kurds yearn all the more fiercely for separate national status. Some even say such a war might help them make their case.

"I think the violence down in Baghdad will lead Kurdistan to independence," said Muhsin Khidir, 30, who was taking a cigarette break near the booksellers. "We don't want that kind of fighting here. If civil war breaks out in Iraq, I'm sure we will have the support of the international community, and we'll just declare ourselves independent."

Older Kurds, who came of age before Kurdistan became an autonomous region in 1991, tend to be more worried about the violence in central Iraq, and more hopeful that their own political leaders can play a mediating role. But they too wonder whether a broader conflict might have accidental benefits.

"I don't like to get my rights in the tragedy of others," said Asos Hardi, 43, a journalist who helped found Hawlati, Kurdistan's main independent newspaper. "But if it will happen and Iraq will become a second Afghanistan, why should we continue with them? It is a logical question."

Kurdistan had its own civil war in the 1990s, when its two main political parties fought for control. Many Kurds do not want to become involved in another war. They are also deeply resentful of Iraqi Arabs, who carried out brutal attacks on Kurdish villages during the reign of former president Saddam Hussein.

Evidence of that animosity can be found almost anywhere. At the outdoor book market -- which sits under a vast mural of Sheik Mahmoud al-Hafeed, the rebel leader who is considered the father of modern Kurdistan -- one of the most popular titles is a paperback called The Bloody History of the Arabs: A Summary. On its cover was a lurid color illustration of a hooded skeleton strangling a beautiful young woman.

But separating from Iraq would be difficult, if not impossible. Apart from any objections the Arabs might raise, Turkey has at least 12 million Kurds within its borders, and has made clear that it would not tolerate an independent Kurdistan. Iran and Syria have Kurdish populations, too, and would probably also object.

New York Times


Bluewarrior, aye somewhat disagree, aye believe you are overestimating the Kurds' political influence in the region.  They also may need mediation themselves. The Kurds have been hampered by continual infighting, along with religious squabbling.  If anything the same bickering that led to the divisions amongst Iraqi Arabs, which the author of the article mentioned has also haunted the Kurds, if not more, and may continue to do so.  The author of the article even conceded (and overlooked) that they were marred with civil war during the 1990s. 

Here is some background, the Kurds are divided into many  factions, which the author of this article obviously appears to be oblivious of, each on one another's throat.  In Turkey for example, when the Kurds came together for a united cause, their main groups, the KDP and PUK, instead of procuring their abysmal situation, started waging battles amongst each other, which lasted for years.

The Kurds are further divided linguistically.  There are scores of dialects that are so distinct from one another it will clearly hamper any thoughts of having them as key stable partners where they themselves can hardly communicate with one another.  For example, the Kurdish language of Kurmanji is so different from the other Kurdish language of Hawrami that it has been noted by linguists that these languages are completly unintelligble to each other. 

There has also been numerous reports of religious infighting amongst the Kurds, the same Shia-Sunni divide that has plagued the Iraqi Arabs has also often troubled the Kurds.  The Kurds even have a handful of "Yazidi" adherants, often incorrectly associated with devil worship, it is an obscure religion that isn't even tied to local religion of Islam. 

And although they have found a tranquil sanctuary in northern Iraq from their Arab rivals as the author of the article stresses, the Kurds as allies are far from being stable. Our intelligence knows this all very well which is why aye feel the Kurds certainly dont carry a big key in all of this.

Nevertheless, the international community must be more watchful in the plight of the Kurds.  The Kurds, although represented fairly well in the current government still need international help.  Unlike the schooling of big Iraqi cities, most Kurdish children don't have access to any form of education.  Kurdish areas hardly have any civil development and the West must not ignore their needs.  Hospitals are all overcrowded and most without even power. 

The Kurds have done their part to stay away from the growing infighting in Iraq and voted in large numbers to further government development.  It is time for the West to be more cognizant of their social conditions and the human rights abuses they have faced. 

Julie Fern

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Re: KURDS as mediators and US ally...
« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2006, 05:08:08 PM »
plus, kurds = turds.

but apparently they have very attractive she-goats.  no kidding!