Law School Discussion

How do you emphasize LSAT scores in a PS?

dubris

How do you emphasize LSAT scores in a PS?
« on: August 02, 2004, 04:23:00 PM »
  Can anyone suggest a good way to emphasize a high LSAT score and de-emphasize GPA in a personal statement? I've looked around and have only found suggestions on the reverse (high GPA/low LSAT.)

Thanks.

lexylit

Re: How do you emphasize LSAT scores in a PS?
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2004, 05:02:04 PM »
your lsat speaks for itself. i doubt there's any way to gracefully draw more attention to it without looking obnoxious & redundant. you can downplay gpa, but you're better off doing so in an addendum. PS is where you get to show you're actually more than just scores and grades.

Bman

Re: How do you emphasize LSAT scores in a PS?
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2004, 05:03:21 PM »
I agree. It would be one thing if the LSAT was normally something that adcomms only looked at sparingly. But they will see your LSAT. There's no point in emphasizing it. It can only hurt.

dubris

Re: How do you emphasize LSAT scores in a PS?
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2004, 05:05:35 PM »
your lsat speaks for itself. i doubt there's any way to gracefully draw more attention to it without looking obnoxious & redundant. you can downplay gpa, but you're better off doing so in an addendum. PS is where you get to shower you're actually more than just scores and grades.

Sounds like good advice. Thanks. I'm thinking I'm better off explaining my GPA in an addendum.

swifty

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Re: How do you emphasize LSAT scores in a PS?
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2004, 06:22:44 PM »
your lsat speaks for itself. i doubt there's any way to gracefully draw more attention to it without looking obnoxious & redundant. you can downplay gpa, but you're better off doing so in an addendum. PS is where you get to show you're actually more than just scores and grades.

Pardon my lack of reseaech and increasing paranoia, but if I was to attach an addendum to my application packet, wouldn't a typical adcomm think "here we go again, another lousy feel sorry for me story."  If you don't have any weaknesses to explain, such as a low GPA, what else would it be used for?  I am hearing a lot of people placing too much trust in what they heard.  I, personally, would like facts, evidence etc.  Personlly I KNOW that the undergrad UC system in CA will spit you out if your GPA and SAT don't match their requirements.  You don't get a chance to tell a story.  your numbers alone spit out a rejection letter.  I feel very strongly, that despite what you have heard, and thst despite what the law schools's website says, a tremendous amount of apps are thrown out by numbers alone, an addendum, or because the adcom is having a bad day.  I highly doubt that schools who say they process each application in it's entirety, is in fact, being truthful.

ruskiegirl

Re: How do you emphasize LSAT scores in a PS?
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2004, 06:58:59 PM »
Most of the materials I have come across suggest that you not mention anything in your personal statement that is already listed in your resume, because it is redundant.  One specifically said that the place to address GPA/LSAT issues is in an addendum and not the personal statement.

I agree that there is virtually no way to emphasize a high LSAT without sounding like a self-glorifying egomaniac.  The number is impressive and there's really no need to find gimicks to play it up.  The GPA could be explained in an addendum, but I would suggest skipping this too, because unless you have a great reason it's probably going to sound whiny.

jacy85

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Re: How do you emphasize LSAT scores in a PS?
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2004, 07:55:57 PM »
In every single resourse I've looked at, every single file gets at least one read, depending on the school's policy, maybe even two looks.

Usually, there are two main methods used.  Either the head of admissions gives each file a read, and divides it into presumption admits, presumptive rejects, and the inbetween section for the rest of the admissions committee, or else the files are spread around, and two people read each file, the files that both people say accept get accepted, both rejects rejected, and if there's no agreement or both say "not sure" then it gets further discussion.

Swifty, I think you'd be greatly helped by picking up Montauk's how to get into the top law schools.  There's a lot of general info, and some info geared toward special cases, like older applications, international applicants, etc.  Many of your comments/questions, from what I can tell having just read the book, are addressed there.

swifty

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Re: How do you emphasize LSAT scores in a PS?
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2004, 10:36:57 PM »
In every single resourse I've looked at, every single file gets at least one read, depending on the school's policy, maybe even two looks.

Usually, there are two main methods used.  Either the head of admissions gives each file a read, and divides it into presumption admits, presumptive rejects, and the inbetween section for the rest of the admissions committee, or else the files are spread around, and two people read each file, the files that both people say accept get accepted, both rejects rejected, and if there's no agreement or both say "not sure" then it gets further discussion.

Swifty, I think you'd be greatly helped by picking up Montauk's how to get into the top law schools.  There's a lot of general info, and some info geared toward special cases, like older applications, international applicants, etc.  Many of your comments/questions, from what I can tell having just read the book, are addressed there.

But Jacy, that really is my point.  Some well respected guy, and I'm not saying he is not, but based on what you had read, do you know for sure that he will tell you if some apps are just automatically rejected.  See, there is a lot of bias to weed through, who published his book, under what circumstances and areas were not allowed based on his publisher.  I really plan on getting thst book, but do you think I should convinced that what he says, and all the others who say all app's are looked at?  Not disrespecting you, or Montauk, but I do still have my doubts.  I guess the best thing to ask is do you get a reason in your rejection letter, do you get to look at your file if you are indeed rejected to see if the personal statement or addendum has markings on it, creases, anything that might show the rejected student that his/her file was actually read? 

I have a GPA issue that really needs to be addressed and according to everything I have read, except Montauk) I should use an addendum.  I just have this sneaking feeling that i culd be bumped just because it's onr extra piece of info an adcom has to read, as opposed to those who don't need one.  Concerned?  Very.  Paranoid.  A bit. 

BTW, I can't get that subliminable message from your avatar.  What does it say?

jacy85

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Re: How do you emphasize LSAT scores in a PS?
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2004, 06:26:50 AM »
I wasn't saying that Montauk is the all-knowing god of admissions.  His was the foremost example I had in my head of the admissions cycle though, since I just read it.  I've read the same or similar explainations in several other sources as well, ranging from the schools' info to general law school books, to personal statement books.

Also, if you get rejected, and call in the "off season" an adcom will usually explain the weak points in your application to you.  This tells me that the file's been read, and they have reasons for rejecting you.

As for the subliminal message in my avatar, the first time I saw it it freaked me out.  It just says something like "buddies.com" or whatever site it came from.  I don't know, as my bf found it for me.  Maybe it's his message to try and get more sex or something...I don't think it's working.   :P

lexylit

Re: How do you emphasize LSAT scores in a PS?
« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2004, 12:04:51 PM »
then by all means, addend away!