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Author Topic: Top three most cutthroat schools?  (Read 2001 times)

yiplong

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Re: Top three most cutthroat schools?
« Reply #10 on: March 24, 2006, 04:58:08 PM »
I heard about UChicago as well, but why is it so competitive?  It is practically king in the Chicago market.  Most any graduate can get good jobs. 

AaronRCheng

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Re: Top three most cutthroat schools?
« Reply #11 on: March 24, 2006, 04:59:34 PM »
On the West Coast, I've heard that Hastings is pretty tough.  Also Southwestern (3T in Los Angeles).  From what I've heard from about a dozen students is the attrition rate was almost up to 20-25% for the bottom of the class.  Those folks there really have to hustle to be competitive with USC, UCLA, Loyola, Pepperdine for LA-based schools.
Loyola it is... and damn happy about it

MindTheGap76

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Re: Top three most cutthroat schools?
« Reply #12 on: March 26, 2006, 04:15:18 AM »
I heard about UChicago as well, but why is it so competitive?  It is practically king in the Chicago market.  Most any graduate can get good jobs. 

I don't normally post over here, but I stumbled across this thread in transit from this one.

As a current Chicago student, let me tell you that these rumors are stupid and false.  As the above person points out, there is no reason for us to be competitive... so we aren't.  It's best not to pay attention to what people who don't go to a school say about the environment there.

mjca83

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Re: Top three most cutthroat schools?
« Reply #13 on: March 26, 2006, 04:29:33 AM »
This is all word of mouth, and in fact, untrue.  I've learned that this is especially untrue about Hastings.  The students are really sensitive to this fallacy.  Yes, there is greater "biglaw" opportunity at Hastings if you place in the top 20% or so, but this is the case at any good school that isn't top 20.  But Hastings is well respected enough that if you perform decently, you will be all right.  My friend, who is graduating this spring, is in the middle of his class but already has a great job.  He said that the competitiveness is completely overhyped and he never even knew the rumor existed until he was a 2nd year student. 

Notice how certain schools have reputations for this kind of thing but no one can pin-point a particular person or experience to justify this reputation ???

dbgirl

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Re: Top three most cutthroat schools?
« Reply #14 on: March 26, 2006, 05:05:24 AM »
I go to Hastings and I think it is extremely competitive.
There are people that don't get caught up in it, but a majority of the students I know spend a LOT of time thinking about the curve and how to beat it.
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TNlawguy

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Re: Top three most cutthroat schools?
« Reply #15 on: March 26, 2006, 06:05:04 AM »
Baylor, Hastings, and the DC schools (maybe?)

Goodfella Aaron

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Re: Top three most cutthroat schools?
« Reply #16 on: March 26, 2006, 11:06:44 AM »
From what I've heard (though I don't really believe it):

Cornell = bottom ivy = inferiority complex = competition
GULC = huge class + nation's capitol = bieng anonymous + desparate desire for clerkships, etc. = competition
Harvard = huge class = anonymous = competition

Actually, at Cornell it's not that competitive because it's so damn small and everyone knows each other. But it seems like people work a lot harder there. And even if you graduate at the bottom of your class at Harvard you can still get an amazing job so I doubt they'd be that competitive either, though as a deferee I really don't know.

NYCK

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Re: Top three most cutthroat schools?
« Reply #17 on: March 26, 2006, 12:51:55 PM »
From what I've heard (though I don't really believe it):

Cornell = bottom ivy = inferiority complex = competition
GULC = huge class + nation's capitol = bieng anonymous + desparate desire for clerkships, etc. = competition
Harvard = huge class = anonymous = competition

Actually, at Cornell it's not that competitive because it's so damn small and everyone knows each other. But it seems like people work a lot harder there. And even if you graduate at the bottom of your class at Harvard you can still get an amazing job so I doubt they'd be that competitive either, though as a deferee I really don't know.

Columbia Law is definitely competitive, as well as Georgetown Law; Columbia's competitiveness isn't cutthroat per se... but it is intensely competitive.

Law School's in general are competitive, besides Yale Law... they have a pass/fail system so the desire to be Number One is virtually nonexistent.

moonpie

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Re: Top three most cutthroat schools?
« Reply #18 on: March 26, 2006, 01:29:09 PM »
big, in a city, without any anchoring undergraduate institution, its position below stanford/boalt make jobs harder to come by.

loki13

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Define 'competitive'
« Reply #19 on: March 26, 2006, 01:31:42 PM »
So, you'rer on a tour of a law school and you hear the following...

"But our students aren't, like, hyper-competitive. I mean, they don't rip the pages out of the books in the library or anything!"

So far I've had this statement, or a variant of it, at every school I've visited.

My thoughts on law school competition:

Some schools have eased up on the competitiveness through their grading policies (ex.- Yale with pass/fail, Buffalo by not having an absolute class rank).

Some schools in the lower tiers are much more competitive than they should be because they overaward scholarships that depend on maintaining an unrealistic class rank or GPA (for example, they give 50% of the incoming students scholarships dependent on maintaining a GPA of 3.2 or above, when the curve is set for 2.7).

Othan than that, all law schools tend to be hyper-competitve at the top-end, for the people competing for the upper echelon of grade. Most schools tend to be competitive because, well, law schools will attract more type-A personalities.

Princeton Review ranks the top 10 as:
1. Baylor
2. St. John's
3. Yeshiva
4. Roger Williams
5. St. Mary's
6. Ohio Northern
7. Bring 'em Young
8. Suffolk
9. Cornell
10. THE (as in only?) Ohio State University

My comments about the list:
1. Baylor- This is generally agreed upon from EVERYTHING I have heard, read, and know from people that have attended.
4. I've talked to faculty. It can be cut-throat. Why? because the stakes are so small.
6. Ohio Northern- gives out unrealistic scholarships, professional focus, attracts overachievers who score low on the LSAT but make up for it with blood, sweat, and tears.
8. A lot of real-world people go here; know they have to do REAL well to get a good job in Bean-town area. Hard workers.
9. Lived near Cornell. Most students live in a little incestuous dorm. Everyone know everyone's business, and behind the smiles, there's sometimes a dagger- if you're gunning for the top of the class.