Law School Discussion

Recommend books for me (just good books to read.. in preparation for life)

redemption

I'm interested in reading a book about England/Britain during the 1980's.  Can anyone suggest anything?

Among the Thugs, by Bill Buford is simply the best book written on England during the 1980s. No question.

ImNobody

I know everyone reads this in high school lit classes, but The Great Gatsby rocks my world. If you like historical goodies, Freedom from Fear is a pretty neat history of the Depression era in the U.S. by David Kennedy. Thomas Friedman's Lexus and the Olive Tree is pretty interesting as well, plus as a journalist his writing moves along quickly and is colored with all sorts of interesting international stories.

Also, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (I'm partial to the 1818 version) is well worth a re-read. The Broadview copy that I have includes several texts contemporay to the book, which is neat- this sounds nerdy but is actually extremely informative and interesting. 

If you like southern lit (with a touch of morbidity):
"A Rose for Emily," William Faulkner
The Sound and The Fury, Faulkner as well
Pretty much anything by Katherine Ann Porter
A Good Man is Hard to Find, Flannery O'Connor

For the Sci-Fi/Fantasy fan in you:
The Crying of Lot 49, Thomas Pynchon
Neuromancer, William Gibson

To make reading itself an 'experience':
"The Nature of the Linguistic Sign," Ferdinand DeSaussure
Of Grammatology, Jacques Derrida (for that matter, anything by Derrida)

It takes going in a slightly different tack, but Alexander Pope can be hilarious- try his poem "Rape of the Lock" for a good satire. Wordsworth's Prelude is good, albeit lengthy, as is Byron's "Don Juan." On yet ANOTHER tack, David Lindley's Where Does the Weirdness Go? Why Quantum Mechanics Isn't As Strange As You Think is a good read.

Oh man, I just referred to Pope as "hilarious," didn't I? Perspective sure does change. I'm going to sit around lurking on this thread for a while, so I can spend my tuition money at the used bookstore.

redemption

I know everyone reads this in high school lit classes, but The Great Gatsby rocks my world. If you like historical goodies, Freedom from Fear is a pretty neat history of the Depression era in the U.S. by David Kennedy. Thomas Friedman's Lexus and the Olive Tree is pretty interesting as well, plus as a journalist his writing moves along quickly and is colored with all sorts of interesting international stories.

Also, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (I'm partial to the 1818 version) is well worth a re-read. The Broadview copy that I have includes several texts contemporay to the book, which is neat- this sounds nerdy but is actually extremely informative and interesting. 

If you like southern lit (with a touch of morbidity):
"A Rose for Emily," William Faulkner
The Sound and The Fury, Faulkner as well
Pretty much anything by Katherine Ann Porter
A Good Man is Hard to Find, Flannery O'Connor

For the Sci-Fi/Fantasy fan in you:
The Crying of Lot 49, Thomas Pynchon
Neuromancer, William Gibson

To make reading itself an 'experience':
"The Nature of the Linguistic Sign," Ferdinand DeSaussure
Of Grammatology, Jacques Derrida (for that matter, anything by Derrida)

It takes going in a slightly different tack, but Alexander Pope can be hilarious- try his poem "Rape of the Lock" for a good satire. Wordsworth's Prelude is good, albeit lengthy, as is Byron's "Don Juan." On yet ANOTHER tack, David Lindley's Where Does the Weirdness Go? Why Quantum Mechanics Isn't As Strange As You Think is a good read.

Oh man, I just referred to Pope as "hilarious," didn't I? Perspective sure does change. I'm going to sit around lurking on this thread for a while, so I can spend my tuition money at the used bookstore.


Jusging from this list, you and I are about as far apart in out taste in books ast two people can get  :D

ImNobody

Sorry for the verbal vomit, I really love my books.
This doesn't quite fit, but if anyone here can get their hot little hands on the old Douglas Adams Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy radio plays, I highly recommend it. Not the same as the books, incidentally.

redemption

Sorry for the verbal vomit, I really love my books.
This doesn't quite fit, but if anyone here can get their hot little hands on the old Douglas Adams Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy radio plays, I highly recommend it. Not the same as the books, incidentally.

Now we're talkin'. I listened to them when I was a kid, just before I went to sleep, after the lights were out. brings back warm and fuzzy memories.  :)

ImNobody

Jusging from this list, you and I are about as far apart in out taste in books ast two people can get  :D


Maybe- I but I'd chew off my own arm to escape an Ayn Rand novel, so there is that. THANK YOU for setting the record straight on that one.

Where does your taste lead, red? I thought that list was pretty broad. Give me something to procrastinate on real work with! Or not. That website is temptation enough. 

ImNobody

I love 'em. When I was little, we listened it all the way to Texas and back.

When I share them with someone else now, and they just look confused/disgusted, I somehow question whether or not they're really my kind of people. Terrible, I know. But if you can't share the glories of Douglas Adams with me, my whole life is going to be a mystery to you. 

redemption

The Southern thing is ok for a bit - one faulkner and one O'connor and you've read them all, basically. Aslo true of Dorothy Allison.

Sci-Fi/Fantasy - I don't like the genre

Lit Theory - Grammatology is too hard for people to read straight up; and reading Saussure is like reading lecture notes.

I don't know what my taste is except that I like it when people write well, have their own voice, and don't rely on gimmickry as a crutch. I think that the so-called Canon is entirely overrated, and that fiction being poduced today is far far superior to that produced at any time before now.

For what it's worth, I think that the most underrated literary stylists that I have read are Beryl Bainbridge (she's so good it hurts) and Raymond Chandler.

last book i read....Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas by Machado de Assis...if you like the latin flava.

The Dread Pirate Roberts

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I love 'em. When I was little, we listened it all the way to Texas and back.

When I share them with someone else now, and they just look confused/disgusted, I somehow question whether or not they're really my kind of people. Terrible, I know. But if you can't share the glories of Douglas Adams with me, my whole life is going to be a mystery to you. 

I'm kinda with you on that.

Though personally, I like the books better than the radio play, even though I know the radio play was first.  There are just so many brilliant details in the books that aren't in the radio show.