Law School Discussion

Recommend books for me (just good books to read.. in preparation for life)

Zeveria

Harry Potter is good pop-reading but worthless compared to most of the books mentioned.

Dostoevsky: Notes From Undergrand.  Much shorter than C&P, but oh so dark
Steinbeck: Cannery Row.  Short and Sweet.
Primo Levi: The Monkey's Wrench
Amos Oz: My Michael
David Sedaris: Barrel Fever, Naked, and Me Talk Pretty One Day.  Each will make you laugh non-stop

Foucault: The History of Sexuality Volume I.  Especially read from page 92-102
Anderson: Imagined Communities

Edward Said: Orientalism. But Question of Palestine is more readable and might be more captivating
Benny Moriss: Righteous Victims

Hanna Arendt: Eichmann in Jerusalem

Peter Kenez: Varieties of Fear

Imre Kertesz: Fateless

Lord of the Rings and Dune

Batman graphic novels (Frank Miller or Jeph Loeb)

pass36

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Batman graphic novels (Frank Miller or Jeph Loeb)

The best Batman graphic novel is The Killing Joke by Alan Moore (V for Vendetta, Watchman, Big Numbers, Miracleman).  Dark Knight is good, but Moore's stuff has more depth than any other writer in the comics medium.  Watchman is the most richly textured comic ever.

Zeveria

I'm all about the absurdists as well, Camus is great. Know any similar authors that one who likes Camus might enjoy?

Fellow Existentialists:
Sartre, No Exit
Beckett, Waiting for Godot

Camus, a French Algerian, resisted the Nazis, but opposed the Algerian independence movement.  Watch the Battle of Algiers--amazing (neo-realist?)film and read Franz Fanon, Wretched of the Earth.  They might make you think a little differently about national independence movements. 

This is open to debate, but I think everything written in the latter half of the 20th century was influenced in some way by, or is explicitly or implicitly allusive to, Camus and Sartre, and existentialism generally. 

Zeveria


Batman graphic novels (Frank Miller or Jeph Loeb)

The best Batman graphic novel is The Killing Joke by Alan Moore (V for Vendetta, Watchman, Big Numbers, Miracleman).  Dark Knight is good, but Moore's stuff has more depth than any other writer in the comics medium.  Watchman is the most richly textured comic ever.

Thank you.  Batman is the greatest super hero I have encountered.

SouthSide

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I'm all about the absurdists as well, Camus is great. Know any similar authors that one who likes Camus might enjoy?

Fellow Existentialists:
Sartre, No Exit
Beckett, Waiting for Godot

Camus, a French Algerian, resisted the Nazis, but opposed the Algerian independence movement.  Watch the Battle of Algiers--amazing (neo-realist?)film and read Franz Fanon, Wretched of the Earth.  They might make you think a little differently about national independence movements. 

This is open to debate, but I think everything written in the latter half of the 20th century was influenced in some way by, or is explicitly or implicitly allusive to, Camus and Sartre, and existentialism generally. 

Yeah, the Battle of Algiers is a fantastic film, and Fanon's stuff is very good as well. I'm not sure that everything from the last 60 years comes from Camus and Sartre, but they have certainly been very influential.

Zeveria

I don't know anything about lit theory, but if something it read then it "influences" the reader.  If all writers have read Camus then all writers have been influenced by him, no?

Zeveria

Conclusively: Everyone studying law must read Henry D. Thoreau's Civil Disobedience.

The 48 Law of Power

The Art of Seduction

magnumalv

I don't know anything about lit theory, but if something it read then it "influences" the reader.  If all writers have read Camus then all writers have been influenced by him, no?

What makes you think all writers have read Camus, though?

Zeveria

I don't know anything about lit theory, but if something it read then it "influences" the reader.  If all writers have read Camus then all writers have been influenced by him, no?

What makes you think all writers have read Camus, though?
I guess it depends on the definition of writer.  If someone has read the basics of 20th c. lit then s/he has read Camus.