Law School Discussion

How much of an advantage is Early Decision?

How much of an advantage is Early Decision?
« on: March 05, 2006, 08:13:40 PM »
Im particularly interested in Gtown. Can anyone provide any informaiton they know about this topic including acceptance rates, etc. Thanks alot.

team mvp

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Re: How much of an advantage is Early Decision?
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2006, 09:01:11 PM »
gives a slight boost if you're towards the 25th %.

"V"

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Re: How much of an advantage is Early Decision?
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2006, 09:09:16 PM »
I have a question: do they offer scholarships to early admits? I mean, if they accept someone then they (usually) HAVE to come. So why would they offer money?

rhythmbomb

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Re: How much of an advantage is Early Decision?
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2006, 12:29:38 AM »
I have a question: do they offer scholarships to early admits? I mean, if they accept someone then they (usually) HAVE to come. So why would they offer money?

That's what I always thought too.  I wouldn't apply anywhere ED unless money was no object (and it is with me).

Slow Blues

Re: How much of an advantage is Early Decision?
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2006, 11:32:17 AM »
I have a question: do they offer scholarships to early admits? I mean, if they accept someone then they (usually) HAVE to come. So why would they offer money?

That's what I always thought too.  I wouldn't apply anywhere ED unless money was no object (and it is with me).

Well, people who do ED tend to hover around the 25th percentile stats. They were never going to get merit money in the first place People who are at the median and higher don't need to do ED; they'll get in anyway and will draw merit money offers. I don't know how it works with need-based aid, but I know my school offers it to whomever needs it, regardless of whether the person was regular decision or early decision.

In response to the original poster, you can try checking out LSN. It's not reliable, but it gives you an idea of the composition of the ED and RD pools.

If schools really wanted to boost their yield, they should offer discounted tuition to ED applicants.