Law School Discussion

Admitted Studenst: What would you do differently in application process?

Mr. Pink

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Im going to start working on my applications this summer.  But what did you learn while in the application process that was too late for you to change but could be of value for those of us who are applying next cycle.

Slow Blues

I was thinking about starting a new thread with application tips for next year's students.

Jontor

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In hindsight, I should have applied to more reaches outside of my locale. I did not and I'm gonna pay dearly for it!  :( >:(

Mr. Pink

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I was thinking about starting a new thread with application tips for next year's students.

Well you could just post in this one...

I would have prepared more before I took the LSAT for the first time. 

Mr. Pink

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I would have applied to a lot fewer schools!

i also would have studied more for the LSAT, instead of just coasting through my prep course.  oh and i would have tried harder in undergrad, but i'm guessing you're way past that point  :D

i would also get more people to read my personal statement.

and of course, apply EARLY!

But you got a 170 goodgal...not bad at all

My only advice is to apply early! Consider carefully which schools to apply to and have a lot of people read your personal statement, that's what I did. I should have taken the LSATs again, but I didn't feel my score would go up that much that it would be worth it and I didn't want to get a lower score because that would have made things worse.

I would have applied to a lot fewer schools!

i also would have studied more for the LSAT, instead of just coasting through my prep course.  oh and i would have tried harder in undergrad, but i'm guessing you're way past that point  :D

i would also get more people to read my personal statement.

and of course, apply EARLY!

I would agree with goodgal.  I applied to way too many school.  I didn't know how schools whould take me graduating from a not-known-at-all ug esp. when looking at student profiles on their website showed a ton of people accepted from elite schools.  I really shouldn't have worried too much about that.

And, if you been lurking on LSD, you should pretty much know the LSAT is KING mentality here.  Well, it certainly seems true to a great extent so you should buckle down and study for the LSAT.  That was a problem for me.  I just kept putting it off.  One of my distractions was lurking on LSD.  Then it was like two weeks before I was to take it and I had all the prep materials but no prep.  Limit your distractions!

AS for applying early, it is good to have everything set to go as soon as possible. With that in mind, go get LORS right now.  My apps were not considered complete for a while cuz' my LORs were MIA.  Even if a prof/employer/whoever says they will send it out by a certain date, doesn't mean that they will.  Get them now so they are with LSDAS when you send out your apps. 

LSAT LSAT LSAT.

I scored a 164 on my diagnostic LSAT.  I figured I could move in to the 170s easily and was doing very well on subsequent practice tests in testing conditions.


I also made these mistakes:

1) not prioritizing the LSAT #1 in my life.  I spent the night before preparing for a conference I was presenting at and leading, and most of the LSAT wondering when I could get out and get on the road to the conference.  At the time, letting down myself on the LSAT was preferable to letting down tons of people on the conference.  Now? Not so much. Screw the conference.  Don't do schedule anything for like two weeks before the LSAT -- get ahead in your classes, clear your schedule, so you can focus, study and relax.

2) not complaining about testing conditions.  I was so LSAT weary I didn't want to take it again and was like "whatever I get, I get", but the LSAT conditions I took the test under were less than stellar.  Picture marching band and parade going by your window during logic games.  Yes, that literally happened.  Good for their Homecoming, bad for my LSAT.  Get a good testing location.  (For NC folks: Duke & Cary > NC Central.)

3) Your resume is amazing.  Yes, I know you think so.  I still think mine is awesome too.  And with my LSAT, I still think my resume is pulling me through to waitlists and early acceptances I "shouldn't" be on.  But it's not going to do nearly as much for you as an LSAT and a GPA will.

4) I thought diversity statements were only for minorities or people with serious problems.  I didn't want to take advantage of opportunities I had to demonstrate that I overcame hardships or provided a unique perspective because I knew the adversity I faced wasn't that bad.  This was stupid.  I'd recommend coming up with a unique aspect for how you're diverse anyway.

You're already way ahead of me though -- I didn't find these boards and LSN until after I'd mailed off all of my apps.

Hybrid Vigor

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I did this, but I'll say it anyway - prep, prep, prep for the LSAT. That 3 digit number is SO important.


I don't think it's all that important to apply early as a minority candidate. Many here disagree, but I think that URM apps are more or less compared against each other towards the end of the app period, so no strong advantage to applying hella early - UNLESS you have stellar numbers (170+ and 3.8+, not one or the other) because that means you will hear back quickly. Just get them in before Xmas and you'll be okay. I applied in October and didn't hear from my reaches until Feb anyway.

Write a separate diversity essay, and make your personal statement about something besides being black, poor, etc whatever you are.

Be honest with yourself and don't waste time applying to schools you don't really want to go to. I only applied to 7 schools, all T14s, and I'm glad I did. It was risky because my "safeties" were Duke and Georgetown, but I knew I wanted and could get into a top 5.

There are only a handful (less than 50) of black applicants each year with 3.5+ GPAs and 165+ LSAT scores. If you are one of those people, do yourself a favor and limit your apps to the t20 unless you ahve good reasons to go elsewhere.