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Cornrows at Howard - Banned!

pass36

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Cornrows at Howard - Banned!
« on: February 26, 2006, 08:44:32 PM »
I saw an article on CNN tonight about how Howard University, or maybe just the Business School, has banned cornrows and long braids.  I didn't catch the exact language.  I was curious about the reaction of folks here.  Good idea, bad idea?  Would it make you more or less likely to go there?

P.S. I know not only black folks go to Howard and I know not only black folks wear cornrows but I am guessing that the only people at Howard who wear cornrows are black so I put it here instead of news discussion.

Re: Cornrows at Howard - Banned!
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2006, 08:45:57 PM »
I think that's excellent personally.. I heard that Hampton University is doing the same....

John Galt

Re: Cornrows at Howard - Banned!
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2006, 08:48:37 PM »
link?

intent06

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Re: Cornrows at Howard - Banned!
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2006, 08:49:43 PM »
Now tell me why that is excellent Blk?

Victor

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Re: Cornrows at Howard - Banned!
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2006, 08:50:45 PM »
I saw an article on CNN tonight about how Howard University, or maybe just the Business School, has banned cornrows and long braids.  I didn't catch the exact language.  I was curious about the reaction of folks here.  Good idea, bad idea?  Would it make you more or less likely to go there?

P.S. I know not only black folks go to Howard and I know not only black folks wear cornrows but I am guessing that the only people at Howard who wear cornrows are black so I put it here instead of news discussion.

Howard sold out.


pass36

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Re: Cornrows at Howard - Banned!
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2006, 08:51:26 PM »
I saw it on TV today around 8 Eastern.  

If this works, if it helps attract better students, what is next?  Uniforms? Curfew?

Re: Cornrows at Howard - Banned!
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2006, 08:51:37 PM »
Please post that article, because I heard something about a school of B banning cornrows and locs, but that was Hampton University.

Either way, it makes sense to me.  Those are both private schools and they can run their schools anyway they want.  If someone has to keep their hair cornrowed, but wants to major in business, there are thousands of other schools he or she can attend.  It seems to me that those hairstyles aren't always socially acceptable in the business field (at least for new hires) and if the purpose of the school is to turn out easily employable graduates, ensuring that students at least look the part of business people is important.

John Galt

Re: Cornrows at Howard - Banned!
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2006, 08:53:50 PM »
yeah, I need to know if this is true so I can start a protest. While dress is important particularly in professional and pre-professional school, I am ashamed that Howard would give in to the idea that any style created and worn predmoninantly by African Americans is so out of the norm to render it unprofessional and worthy of ban. Howard is becoming too pacifiying of white business culture, especially in the school of B.

M DOT

Re: Cornrows at Howard - Banned!
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2006, 08:54:35 PM »
i read the article about hampton's ban and think it's bs personally.....i mean why not just be straight up and say no natural styles unless it's pulled back in a bun or ponytail for women and men need to keep it cut low and edged up??


Re: Cornrows at Howard - Banned!
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2006, 08:55:35 PM »
http://www.wtopnews.com/?nid=25&sid=676513

Jan 21st - 8:10am
 

HAMPTON, Va. - Afros are OK but cornrows and flowing dreadlocks are not for business administration students at Hampton University.

The hair code is part of a strict academic and dress doctrine for combined business administration students at the private, historically black university. The program allows students to receive a bachelor's degree and a master's in business administration in five years.

In addition to the hair rules, students must maintain a B average after their sophomore year, heed a conservative dress code, complete two internships and meet regularly with business leaders.


"We don't have problems with Afros," business Dean Sid Credle said Friday. "A nicely tapered Afro - that's fine."

Credle said the dress, grooming and behavior rules are intended to prepare students for the starched business world.

"When we look at the top 75 African Americans in corporate America, we don't see any of them with extreme hairdos," he said.

With the requirements, "they'll get very comfortable wearing a suit over a five-year period. When they get into corporate America, the transition will be easier," Credle said.

Aaron Wells, a junior from Fairfax, put away his earrings when he enrolled. He's got no complaints.

"It really gives us a very good model of what we should be doing in corporate America," said Wells, who hopes to pursue a career in finance. "We need to look the part as professionals."

Credle said only one or two students per year have not complied.

Jack L. Ezzell Jr., the president of Zel Technologies, a defense contractor in Hampton, said different businesses have different standards. Distinctive dress and hairstyles "might be acceptable in, say, advertising or some other medium that's a bit more informal and creative," he said.

"But clearly, if you were targeting banking or maybe the military or someplace that's a lot more rigid, you've got to be really cautious in doing that."

At his company, standards also vary for technicians and people in marketing.

"Where I have someone who is going to potentially meet with the customer," Ezzell said, "I expect them to look more like the customer would. "I've seen dreads and earrings that look good.

"If they are exceptionally bright, I would not turn them off automatically. But I know many of my business associates would."

At Norfolk Southern Corp., hair and dress matter less than ability, spokeswoman Susan Terpay said. "When we hire new employees," she said, "we focus on their education, their skills and the unique abilities they can bring."

(Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)