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Author Topic: Focusing on Trademark experience in personal statement  (Read 1352 times)

shanrocks

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Focusing on Trademark experience in personal statement
« on: July 27, 2004, 12:53:52 PM »
Hello everyone.  I am new to the board and seeking advice.  I am an older applicant (31) and am hoping that my work experience will help me in the admissions process.  I have been out of college for seven years and my UGPA was a 3.1.  I had no idea I wanted to study Law until I began working in the legal field.  How does the below-referenced topic sound?  This is the very beginning of the essay.  I would go on to describe how I have proven the value of a strong work ethic at my current firm and how I moved from an entry level receptionist to a Trademark Paralegal in less than a year.  Further, I would go on to discuss how I look forward to leaving my own "mark" on the school at which I am accepted, as well as in the field of Law.  Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.  Please feel free to totally rip it apart also.


“Lexus Locklear.”  Blonde bombshell, acclaimed pornstar, and, according to the firm for which I work, trademark infringer.  Prior to my employment with Shaw Pittman, I never realized the value of a name or the time and process by which such value is acquired. In many ways, my journey towards applying to law school is very similar to the steps taken by our  client Toyota to establish its prestigious trademark Lexus.

It started a year and a half ago with an application.  My dear friend passed it along and insisted I complete it.  Much to my dismay, the position for which I was applying was an entry level Receptionist.  With hesitation, I maneuvered my way downtown and interviewed, and , with an even greater sense of doom, took the position and began working for the firm in April 2003. 

jacy85

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Re: Focusing on Trademark experience in personal statement
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2004, 02:21:31 PM »
It's ok, but not great.  If the rest of the essay was included, I don't know how inclined I would be to read it, but that's just me.  The first paragraph was decent, and the first sentence grabs your attention, but the second paragraph is awkward and pretty much kills the whatever interest I'd had.

This essay will be very hard to turn into a gripping PS in general, since hundreds of people applying to law school will have legal experience, and many of those will write about it.  How many really interesting ways are there to say "I was a paralegal, liked it, and want to move on to law school?"  Understandably, not everyone has traveled and lived in an impoverished country for 6 months, or done somethign *truly* unique, but that doesnt' mean you can't turn your life experiences into a great and insightful story.  However, with somethign that's as run of the mill as being a paralegal, you've got a lot of work ahead of you to make it interesting.

shanrocks

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Re: Focusing on Trademark experience in personal statement
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2004, 02:58:53 PM »
Thank you for your constructive criticism.  Being a Paralegal IS what made me want to study law.  The fact that someone has been to an "impoverised nation" as you mention certainly does not mean they are a good candidate for law school.  Having worked for United Airlines for seven years, I have travelled all over the world.  None of that has any bearing on my desire to practice law.  Doing the work of a lawyer every day, for eight hours a day and then having someone else sign the paper is what motivates me.  I want to see my own signature on the documents that I draft.

I think the perception that you have to have had some grand experience in your life to be accepted into law school is a rather elitist attitude to possess (by the way, I am not saying that this is your attitude). Not everyone has the luxury of travel, or even of volunteering, as a lot of people work full-time as an undergrad.  In addition, I am 31, not fresh out of college like most of you, so my grades are not my focus.

Best of luck in your pursuit of a law degree!

jacy85

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Re: Focusing on Trademark experience in personal statement
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2004, 03:05:52 PM »
I definitely don't have that attitude, just to clarify, and I posted a topic I'm using for my PS and someone gave me some rather awful criticism and basically suggested that the only good PS's are those writted about exciting, noble things liek saving someone from a burning building.

I do think, however, that working in a law firm is one of the harder thigns to write about because the experience is so *not* unique.  I didn't say you couldn't do it, I just think you will have to put in a huge amt of effort to make it doable.  It's hard to make something interesting to adcoms when it's a topic that they read about probably 20 times a day, but it CAN be done.

Perhaps you can write about something else, adn then tie your work as a paralegal into it somehow?  Some intersting anecdote about working for UA, that can showcase somethign in your personality that can then be followed through by linking it to being a paralegal?  Not listing your resume off, but  you spent a significant amt of time with UA, and if I read about people working in law firms all day and "why I want to be a lawyer" essays all the time, starting off with some story about flying off somewhere would be a fresh change, adn be a more inventive way to bring in your paralegal experience?

May not work, depending on your experiences, but just another idea to toss around.

swifty

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Re: Focusing on Trademark experience in personal statement
« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2004, 03:44:38 AM »
Yeah, that was me who offered the aweful criticism about burning buildings.  Since I've stopped offering advice errr criticism on PS's, I really think you should focus 100% on the LSAT now since you are working full time.  You can work on your PS after the LSAT.
This is not advice or criticism, but when I work on my PS, I am going to think of it as a power statement, and I really wished I had traveled all over the world to see the various cultures compared to the US.  While traveling, I might even think about how other countries deal with patents, do they have them, are there major conflicts going on between international patent infringement, but alas, the furthest East I have been is Reno Nevada.     
And the sign said "Long-haired freaky people need not apply" So I tucked my hair up under my hat and I went in to ask him why. He said "You look like a fine outstanding young man, I think you'll do.  So I took off my hat, I said "Imagine that. Huh! Me workin' for you!"Sign, sign, everywhere a sign..