Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Wanting to go to law school in Canada, and Practicing in USA  (Read 2993 times)

costaragas

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Wanting to go to law school in Canada, and Practicing in USA
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2006, 01:37:40 PM »
Be careful.  McGill in Montreal is a civil law program - meaning you're instructed in the Quebec Civil Code, as opposed to civil common law which governs the rest of North America.

Cool city though.

McGill offers both Common and Civil law degrees in the form of a 3 to 4 year program. They also have a policy of passive bilingualism, which means that you should be able to at least communicate somewhat in both official languages if you wish to attend McGill.

Costa Ragas
Canadian Law School Admissions Web
http://www.clsaweb.com

costaragas

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Wanting to go to law school in Canada, and Practicing in USA
« Reply #11 on: February 15, 2006, 01:45:18 PM »
As a general rule for law school, you should be going to school in the jurisdiction where you intend to practice. Now it's a little different when you consider the common law jurisdictions in Canada... They've been working together to make mobility much easier, so that if you get your degree in BC, you can practice in Nova Scotia. That being said, if you study far from where you intend to work, you have the disadvantage of a weak network in your work area once you arrive, and it makes finding a job that much more difficult. On the other hand, you may opt for private practice, in which case you will have to build a client base without knowing too many people in that market. It's tough...

For the American schools, there are a handful of "national" schools where your degree can take you anywhere. But most schools tend to focus in their local state jurisdictions. And then of course, the same principle applies as the Canadian schools when it come to finding a job.

The joint degree programs offer the best of both worlds. But there is something to consider, and that is (like it or not), name recognition. NYU/Osgoode has excellent name recognigtion, but is fairly competitive. Windsor/Detroit Mercy? Not the same ball game. Most US employers will have never heard of the University of Windsor, unless you plan on working in Detroit.

Choose wisely,
Costa Ragas
Canadian Law School Admissions Web
http://www.clsaweb.com

Re: Wanting to go to law school in Canada, and Practicing in USA
« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2006, 08:05:10 PM »
University of Toronto, McGill, and Osgoode Hall at York University (to a lesser extent) are the best Canadian choices if you wish to practice in the US with a Canadian law degree.  U of  T and McGill send about 10-15 summers to NYC and Boston each year.  Osgoode sends a few, and sometimes U of Western Ontario or UBC may send one.  These are not great numbers, so if you wish to practice in the US, you are much better off at an American law school.

Apples and Oranges

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 457
  • My puppy
    • AOL Instant Messenger - MissPalmboom
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Wanting to go to law school in Canada, and Practicing in USA
« Reply #13 on: May 30, 2006, 03:16:19 PM »
As a general rule for law school, you should be going to school in the jurisdiction where you intend to practice. Now it's a little different when you consider the common law jurisdictions in Canada... They've been working together to make mobility much easier, so that if you get your degree in BC, you can practice in Nova Scotia. That being said, if you study far from where you intend to work, you have the disadvantage of a weak network in your work area once you arrive, and it makes finding a job that much more difficult. On the other hand, you may opt for private practice, in which case you will have to build a client base without knowing too many people in that market. It's tough...

For the American schools, there are a handful of "national" schools where your degree can take you anywhere. But most schools tend to focus in their local state jurisdictions. And then of course, the same principle applies as the Canadian schools when it come to finding a job.

The joint degree programs offer the best of both worlds. But there is something to consider, and that is (like it or not), name recognition. NYU/Osgoode has excellent name recognigtion, but is fairly competitive. Windsor/Detroit Mercy? Not the same ball game. Most US employers will have never heard of the University of Windsor, unless you plan on working in Detroit.

Choose wisely,
Costa Ragas
Canadian Law School Admissions Web
http://www.clsaweb.com

There is a third joint program, which is UOttawa/American. While obviously not as prestigious as NYU/Osgoode, it offers a bit more of an in between as far as name recognition goes, or so I suspect (it's actually the route I hope to follow).

gillesthegreat

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 609
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Wanting to go to law school in Canada, and Practicing in USA
« Reply #14 on: May 30, 2006, 03:28:11 PM »
Il est possible d'etudier le droit commun a l'U de M, mais ca restreint enormement tes possibilites. Les firmes americaines se concentrent d'habitude sur McGill; je connais d'ailleurs quelque personnes (au moins 3 ou 4) qui n'ont eu aucune difficulte a se trouver un emploi aux E-U. Cependant, la question du barreau est pertinente. Seuls quelques etats permettent l'examen aux gens ne detenant pas un JD: Mass, NY et Californie sont les plus connus et les plus pertinents. A mon humble avis, l'U de M ne te permettrait pas vraiment de percer aux E-U, a moins de d'abord travailler pour une firme locale. McGill est de beaucoup un meilleur investissement. Et comme il a ete mentionne plus haut, il est possible d'y faire une substantielle partie des cours en frencais. Bonne chance.
Penn (2007)