Law School Discussion

Pen Scanners

Brett McKay

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Pen Scanners
« on: February 02, 2006, 11:15:37 AM »
I was wondering if anybody has used those handheld pen scanners designed to scan text. It looks like it would come in very handy in law school. Instead of highlighting and having to go back through your case book, you can highlight and plug it directly into your notes on computer. Your thought? Is it worth the $200 investment?

Re: Pen Scanners
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2006, 11:47:27 AM »
I would go for 6 colored highlighters instead.  One each for: Procedural posture, facts, issue, rules of law, reasoning, and holding.  Then use the limited margins for any additional notes.  Summarize classes every 3 weeks or every time you are finished with a major issue.

Re: Pen Scanners
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2006, 04:27:53 PM »
HIGHLIGHTER WH*RE!

:)

i detest highlighters and people who highlight like that make me siiiick

agreed though on summarizes. i'm going to start my outline for each class about 3 weeks in and then just add every time we cover a new issue. and obviously brief all of the cases so i have them in my own words with my own little notes on the bottom.

I never highlighted before law school.  It's extremely effective.  It also replaces briefing, which takes up WAY too much time.  Also, briefing in general is probably not the best use of your time.  Last semester, I hardly had any cases on my outlines.  Generally, cases are there to help you see how a rule of law is applied in the real world.  They get you to "think like a lawyer."  But come exam time, they're not too useful.

Re: Pen Scanners
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2006, 04:59:23 PM »
HIGHLIGHTER WH*RE!

:)

i detest highlighters and people who highlight like that make me siiiick

agreed though on summarizes. i'm going to start my outline for each class about 3 weeks in and then just add every time we cover a new issue. and obviously brief all of the cases so i have them in my own words with my own little notes on the bottom.

I never highlighted before law school.  It's extremely effective.  It also replaces briefing, which takes up WAY too much time.  Also, briefing in general is probably not the best use of your time.  Last semester, I hardly had any cases on my outlines.  Generally, cases are there to help you see how a rule of law is applied in the real world.  They get you to "think like a lawyer."  But come exam time, they're not too useful.

I've heard this about briefing as well. Everyone starts off briefing every case, but by the end of the semester few are still doing it because it's so time consuming and not very effective/helpful.

Re: Pen Scanners
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2006, 05:09:27 PM »
HIGHLIGHTER WH*RE!

:)

i detest highlighters and people who highlight like that make me siiiick

agreed though on summarizes. i'm going to start my outline for each class about 3 weeks in and then just add every time we cover a new issue. and obviously brief all of the cases so i have them in my own words with my own little notes on the bottom.

I never highlighted before law school.  It's extremely effective.  It also replaces briefing, which takes up WAY too much time.  Also, briefing in general is probably not the best use of your time.  Last semester, I hardly had any cases on my outlines.  Generally, cases are there to help you see how a rule of law is applied in the real world.  They get you to "think like a lawyer."  But come exam time, they're not too useful.

I've heard this about briefing as well. Everyone starts off briefing every case, but by the end of the semester few are still doing it because it's so time consuming and not very effective/helpful.

Yea, I didn't really brief after the first week.  Whenever I did brief a case, I just kept thinking about what a waste of time it was.  You're much better off figuring out the rules (aka black letter law) and reading cases with those in mind.  Then think about why the court ruled how it did.  And ask if you agree with the court (numerous times you'll disagree with the court's interpretation which is OK).  Get in that mindset and bring it on exam day.