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Author Topic: Scholarship  (Read 1454 times)

RockyMtnHighMama

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Scholarship
« on: July 23, 2004, 11:25:16 AM »
From what I've been able to observe, the only bite at the scholarship apple comes in the App/PS (ok, well maybe in the FAFSA, if you count grants).

My question:

If I were to thoroughly tailor the PS to Colorado  (since I'm only applying to the one school), would that make me more likely to get a scholarship, or less (since it is obvious I will go there anyway with or without)?

jacy85

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Re: Scholarship
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2004, 01:10:02 PM »
How do you figure that it's based on the PS??  It was my understanding that, in some ways similar to undergrad and the SAT, it was highly based on the lsat score, and the higher your score (and gpa), the more likely you would be to get $$.

The ZAPINATOR

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« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2004, 01:16:11 PM »
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RockyMtnHighMama

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Re: Scholarship
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2004, 02:45:36 PM »
I guess that gets to the heart of the question... What is the purpose of Scholarships, from the point of view of the Adcom?

From what I can tell, there are very very precious few merit-only scholarships available at CU. Really, it seems like there's only one, given to 'several' first year students, in amounts (as of 2003) from $500 to $5000. I imagine they think "How shall we spread this money around to our best advantage?" that one of the thoughts they might have is to use scholarships as leverage to get the best class possible. So if a strong candidate is obviously coming to their school with no effort on the adcom's part, why should they give a scholarship? They could spend the money on someone else. I feel caught in a little bit of a trap... my LSAT score is seriously above the 75% number for both schools in Colorado, so I need them to know I'm not applying to higher-tier schools, and at the same time, I don't want them to think I wouldn't like a scholarship. (My oldest will begin college while I'm still in LS... all money helps!)

All other scholarships are either need- or diversity-based. There are lots and lots of those. But as far as I can tell, I don't qualify for any of those, because I'm a married white woman, whose husband has a decent job, applying to a school with a 56% female population.

Ginatio

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Re: Scholarship
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2004, 02:49:10 PM »
the TRUE purpose of a merit based scholarship is so that schools can convince applicants that would otherwise go elsewhere to come to their institution instead.

since you're only applying to colorado--and if you make it apparent in your personal statement that you're only applying to colorado--you may find yourself without any merit aid whatsoever since you will have no bargaining leverage.

RockyMtnHighMama

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Re: Scholarship
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2004, 02:53:31 PM »
Ain't that a nice knot. :o

I guess that settles it. I'll have to apply to Denver, too. (But my numbers are super seriously above their 75%... and Chiashu says I have a lower chance of admission to DU than to CU. Go figure.)

Minc

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Re: Scholarship
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2004, 03:00:05 PM »
I agree. Merit scholarships are intended to attract qualified candidates who have other law school options. The adcoms want to draw those with high numbers to their school, so scholarships will be largely based on your stats. However, if you give the adcom cause to believe that you are set on going there (by tailoring your PS as such and also by indicating that you have no other current law school apps), they may realize that they do not need to lure you (and your high numbers) with the offer of free money. They may choose to offer that money to another qualified candidate who has not made it so clear, in an effort to persuade him.

The ZAPINATOR

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« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2004, 03:18:54 PM »
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RockyMtnHighMama

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Re: Scholarship
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2004, 03:54:42 PM »
Thinking of Jacy's response: In retrospect, I must have been incredibly incredibly naive when I was applying for undergrad - and got quite lucky with a full-ride school-based tuition scholarship plus a NMS that covered room, board, and books. I did the one-school application thing then, too. It never for a minute crossed my mind that merit wouldn't add up to money.

LS must be a different ball-game.

Thanks for the heads up on how this is going to have to be a game of negotiation. That changes the picture some. I still think it's a bind, because I need to convince them to give me an admit despite possible yield protection concerns, yet persuade them to offer $$.

jacy85

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Re: Scholarship
« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2004, 04:06:49 PM »
Actually, if they don't give you money, sometimes all you have to do is ask for it.  I would definitely apply to two schools, although Colorado may give you money anyway.
However, if Colorado lets you in (which hopefully they will, and your numbers are above their 75%), and they don't give any aid, you can always call/write a nice letter and explain that you liked their school a lot, but you would also like more money. Then you can just make a reference that you got into Devener and they offered you money (if that happens).  I wouldn't necessarily say they offered $x amount, but just asking implies that you were offered more than Colorado has on the table.  If you get more, great.  If not, nothing lost.