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Author Topic: What would you consider a diploma mill?  (Read 16973 times)

thelawfool

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Re: What would you consider a diploma mill?
« Reply #40 on: August 07, 2006, 03:28:22 PM »
i'm not reading this complete thread.  but zardoz, i hope you are a freaking genius because these questions tell me that you have some serious social issues.  what's with the ridiculous questions? 
FIU Class of 2009

Paper Chaser

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Re: What would you consider a diploma mill?
« Reply #41 on: February 25, 2007, 03:01:31 AM »
Most top law schools are nothing but diploma mills, if you get in you are golden. Example...Duke

ishi

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Re: What would you consider a diploma mill?
« Reply #42 on: March 15, 2007, 07:22:48 PM »
well?  I mean what type of school would one have to go to be considered a real lawyer?

My firm hires a very well-paid trial attorney on a contractual basis.  He went to an unaccredited* school (San Francisco Law School).  Likewise, my ex-gf's mother went to Lincoln Law School (makes me think of Lincoln Logs) and she has a pretty successful family law practice.  She went part-time and worked all the way through, but she's doing well for herself.  It's hard to make it from no-name schools, but it can happen if you're serious.  I'd consider both of these people "real" lawyers.




* correct me if I'm wrong on that..

1654134681665465

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Re: What would you consider a diploma mill?
« Reply #43 on: March 17, 2007, 03:46:47 AM »
The University of San Francisco has been accredited since 1935.  There are a lot of schools through which there are pretty good job prospects.  You can make good money without working in a big law firm.  My friend's Dad went to Southwestern (which is by no means a national school), but he makes a lot of money.  A lot depends on how hard you work and the chances that you are willing to take.  Sometimes working for a really small firm pays off, because you can make a greater share of the profits once business picks up. 

ishi

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Re: What would you consider a diploma mill?
« Reply #44 on: March 17, 2007, 09:53:38 PM »
The University of San Francisco has been accredited since 1935.  There are a lot of schools through which there are pretty good job prospects.  You can make good money without working in a big law firm.  My friend's Dad went to Southwestern (which is by no means a national school), but he makes a lot of money.  A lot depends on how hard you work and the chances that you are willing to take.  Sometimes working for a really small firm pays off, because you can make a greater share of the profits once business picks up. 

Assuming you were responding to my comment -- I was talking about San Francisco Law school, not USF.

http://www.sfls.edu/

not

http://www.usfca.edu/

The Poster

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quote Stanley J. Watson III
you are doomed in the fated sense, but that's completely irrelevant because that's only from the viewpoint of someone who is not constrained by time. since you are temporal, for all intents and purposes you have the power to change your future

1654134681665465

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Re: What would you consider a diploma mill?
« Reply #46 on: March 18, 2007, 03:01:33 PM »
Hmmm, yeah I don't think SFLS is ABA accredited.  It might be provisionally accredited.  There are several schools like that in California.  In either case the rest of my comment still applies. 

ishi

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Re: What would you consider a diploma mill?
« Reply #47 on: March 19, 2007, 07:08:49 PM »
Hmmm, yeah I don't think SFLS is ABA accredited.  It might be provisionally accredited.  There are several schools like that in California.  In either case the rest of my comment still applies. 

Right -- just clarifying.  I agree with the rest of your comment.

Funky Cold Hrdina

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Re: What would you consider a diploma mill?
« Reply #48 on: April 27, 2007, 06:48:34 AM »
tag

The Poster

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Re: What would you consider a diploma mill?
« Reply #49 on: April 29, 2007, 11:05:21 PM »
quote Stanley J. Watson III
you are doomed in the fated sense, but that's completely irrelevant because that's only from the viewpoint of someone who is not constrained by time. since you are temporal, for all intents and purposes you have the power to change your future