Law School Discussion

indes scores

cjprof4

indes scores
« on: December 02, 2003, 03:17:34 PM »
I found the index scoring formulas for each school on the LSAC website, but does anyone know how to find each schools presumptive numbers in addition to those formulas?

NeverForever

Re: indes scores
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2004, 09:03:32 AM »
No, but I'm curious as well. I put in the schools I want to apply to and my stats and it gave me an index number. But I have no idea how to use it. Anyone know?

!@#$%

  • ****
  • 1176
    • View Profile
Re: indes scores
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2004, 09:07:03 AM »
You can look at last year's applicants.  Have the list sort by index number, and you can get a good idea of what index numbers are strong/weak for the school.

Re: indes scores
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2004, 09:22:34 AM »
Take index score and go to lawschoolnumbers.com.. You can compare index scores from last years class...

TDPookie1

  • *****
  • 7929
  • the sugar cane is back!
    • AOL Instant Messenger - PookieEsq2B
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: indes scores
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2004, 10:08:43 AM »
You can try asking the schools what they do with the index number.  I did this.  Most of them denied having or using one at all, and the others said they use it only to sort the applications, but that they do not make decisions based on them.

Essentially, you won't be able to find a real answer to the presumptive admit question, but like drowles said, you can go to lawschoolnumbers.com and see how people did with your index score last year.  You can also take the 75th percentile GPA and LSAT, plug them into the index formula, and see how your index score compares to the index score for the 75th percentile numbers.  If you're above that number, you're in good shape.

absy

  • ****
  • 3823
    • View Profile
Re: indes scores
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2004, 11:05:14 AM »
I kind of prefer looking at the graphs on LSN.  For a number of schools, you can find a relatively clear reject line.

Graph the school, then take only the rejections, and they usually stop at a certain line.  Granted, there are people below that line who get accepted, but most people above will not get outright rejected.  Add in the waitlists/deferrals, and you can find a pretty accurate depiction.

I use this because the indices can be a bit deceptive for people with splits IMO.

TDPookie1

  • *****
  • 7929
  • the sugar cane is back!
    • AOL Instant Messenger - PookieEsq2B
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: indes scores
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2004, 11:24:36 AM »
That's a good point re splits.  I don't have one, but I haven't used the 75th percentile method myself.  I use the graph, and graph only accepts and rejects.  If you can draw a clear line through the graph to separate the two groups, it seems like those are the numbers-heavy schools.  For the ones that were like this, I was in the accept region.  For most of the schools (of the ones I'm appplying to), though, there wasn't a perfect line, and I'm kind of in a maybe region.

absy

  • ****
  • 3823
    • View Profile
Re: indes scores
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2004, 11:33:56 AM »
I had a little trouble with that, but then I started looking at the rejections only first.  Even with Harvard, you can plot a relatively clear reject line.  The reason it doesn't come out as clear overall is because of the interesting people got in nonetheless, however you want to define interesting.