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Author Topic: Sixth Circuit rules Ohio judge cannot display Ten Commandments in courtroom  (Read 789 times)

jgruber

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Wudya think?  And please keep in mind that the Constitution does not recognize the right for government to endorse widely held religious beliefs.


http://jurist.law.pitt.edu/paperchase/2004/07/sixth-circuit-rules-ohio-judge-cannot.htm

Sixth Circuit rules Ohio judge cannot display Ten Commandments in courtroom
Chris Buell on 7/15/2004 12:34:05 PM

The US Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit has ruled that an Ohio state judge may not display the Ten Commandments on a poster in his courtroom. In its 2-1 ruling made Wednesday, the appeals court upheld a 2000 district court ruling that Judge James DeWeese, who serves on the Richland County Common Pleas Court, may not display the Commandments. DeWeese had placed the poster, featuring the Commandments and the Bill of Rights with the heading, "the rule of law," in his Mansfield courtroom. The Sixth Circuit wrote:

    By placing the Decalogue in apparent equipoise with the Bill of Rights in this manner, DeWeese has created the effect of an endorsement of a particular religious code, vis à vis the Ten Commandments, by the government. Thus, even had Appellant’s non-secular purpose not been announced so clearly in his deposition testimony, we could still find that this particular display of the Ten Commandments constitutes an impermissible government endorsement of religion in violation of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment.