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Author Topic: Anyone else really nervous about getting LOR's??  (Read 3298 times)

EL217

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Re: Anyone else really nervous about getting LOR's??
« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2004, 03:26:25 PM »
Hmmm, maybe you can ask for a LOR from the Academic Dean (usually are professors too) ... I know I have some friends who ended up writing the first draft of their LORs for their professors (they barely knew their profs too) ...

smujd2007

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Re: Anyone else really nervous about getting LOR's??
« Reply #11 on: July 20, 2004, 08:13:29 PM »
Muhkia - I think one academic letter will work fine, since you've been out of school. Despite what someone else said, four years is a long time, and you have probably grown a lot since then.  Your current employer may be a better person to "predict" your readiness for law school. (ha-ha)
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mukhia

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Re: Anyone else really nervous about getting LOR's??
« Reply #12 on: July 20, 2004, 10:47:52 PM »
Hello my trusty advisers, please tell me if this is too flimsy or hokey to use as a LOR.  For the past three years, I have been reading to a blind lady who is an English instructor at a local community college.  During the semester, I read her her students' essays and mark her corrections, and I rate her students on visual aspects of their video-recorded speeches.  I thought I might ask her to write my third LOR instead of two from my employers.  What do you guys think? 

swifty

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Re: Anyone else really nervous about getting LOR's??
« Reply #13 on: July 20, 2004, 11:59:33 PM »
I am in your exact position.  I am choosing one prof from each of my majors in whose class I got an A.  However, I didn't much talk to any of them out of class other than an office visit or two for a question.  I was planning on bringing in some of my work from their class along with my other info.  This is actually the part of my apps I have been the most nervous about (even more than the LSAT) because I don't know what I will do if they say no.

If you know the professor just from class, and you even have an inkling that he/she may say no, then don't use that person.  I would be very surprised if a professor said no.  Afterall, when you become a famous attorney, that prof will look back and say "Hey, That famous guy was my student."  Also, I have never run accross a professor who doesn't want to see there students succeed.  It's a great way for them to build up their ego, but in all actuality, it really comes down to the fact that they want you to succed in life.  They may also feel flattered by the request.  That should not come as a shock.
And the sign said "Long-haired freaky people need not apply" So I tucked my hair up under my hat and I went in to ask him why. He said "You look like a fine outstanding young man, I think you'll do.  So I took off my hat, I said "Imagine that. Huh! Me workin' for you!"Sign, sign, everywhere a sign..

Kwertee

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Re: Anyone else really nervous about getting LOR's??
« Reply #14 on: July 21, 2004, 12:13:17 AM »
It's that third one that UCLA wants that is killing me.  I had a lock on two, and now I have to drag in a prof from two years ago that I am sure does not know me.  However, I did get a 98% and a 95% on his midterm and final and a 95% on the 20 page research paper.  The total class average was an 82%, so I hope my excellent grades and rereading my paper will be enough for him to say yes.

I am in your exact position.  I am choosing one prof from each of my majors in whose class I got an A.  However, I didn't much talk to any of them out of class other than an office visit or two for a question.  I was planning on bringing in some of my work from their class along with my other info.  This is actually the part of my apps I have been the most nervous about (even more than the LSAT) because I don't know what I will do if they say no.

If you know the professor just from class, and you even have an inkling that he/she may say no, then don't use that person.  I would be very surprised if a professor said no.  Afterall, when you become a famous attorney, that prof will look back and say "Hey, That famous guy was my student."  Also, I have never run accross a professor who doesn't want to see there students succeed.  It's a great way for them to build up their ego, but in all actuality, it really comes down to the fact that they want you to succed in life.  They may also feel flattered by the request.  That should not come as a shock.

swifty

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Re: Anyone else really nervous about getting LOR's??
« Reply #15 on: July 21, 2004, 12:24:57 AM »
It's that third one that UCLA wants that is killing me.  I had a lock on two, and now I have to drag in a prof from two years ago that I am sure does not know me.  However, I did get a 98% and a 95% on his midterm and final and a 95% on the 20 page research paper.  The total class average was an 82%, so I hope my excellent grades and rereading my paper will be enough for him to say yes.

I am in your exact position.  I am choosing one prof from each of my majors in whose class I got an A.  However, I didn't much talk to any of them out of class other than an office visit or two for a question.  I was planning on bringing in some of my work from their class along with my other info.  This is actually the part of my apps I have been the most nervous about (even more than the LSAT) because I don't know what I will do if they say no.

If you know the professor just from class, and you even have an inkling that he/she may say no, then don't use that person.  I would be very surprised if a professor said no.  Afterall, when you become a famous attorney, that prof will look back and say "Hey, That famous guy was my student."  Also, I have never run accross a professor who doesn't want to see there students succeed.  It's a great way for them to build up their ego, but in all actuality, it really comes down to the fact that they want you to succed in life.  They may also feel flattered by the request.  That should not come as a shock.

Based on what you said, it seems the biggest hurdle you have is the teacher remembering who you are.  Again, it's been my experience, that if you did well, you will be very surprised when that teacher says

"yeah, I know you.  you got an A in my class."  I wouldn't stress, if he really doesn't remember you, take your tests like you said, and show it to him, (or mail, however you do it) These professors were only out to get us while we were in school, not after graduating :) 
And the sign said "Long-haired freaky people need not apply" So I tucked my hair up under my hat and I went in to ask him why. He said "You look like a fine outstanding young man, I think you'll do.  So I took off my hat, I said "Imagine that. Huh! Me workin' for you!"Sign, sign, everywhere a sign..

jacy85

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Re: Anyone else really nervous about getting LOR's??
« Reply #16 on: July 21, 2004, 08:45:05 AM »
I think this would be a great rec.  If you managed to get one academic(or a second work rec, if not possible), one work, and one from this woman, I think that would help present an incredibly well-rounded person.  You've gotten to know this woman probably in a different way than your professors and your employer, and I'm sure she's seen aspects of you they haven't.  I'd go for it, if I was in your position.

Hello my trusty advisers, please tell me if this is too flimsy or hokey to use as a LOR.  For the past three years, I have been reading to a blind lady who is an English instructor at a local community college.  During the semester, I read her her students' essays and mark her corrections, and I rate her students on visual aspects of their video-recorded speeches.  I thought I might ask her to write my third LOR instead of two from my employers.  What do you guys think? 

Moogle

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Re: Anyone else really nervous about getting LOR's??
« Reply #17 on: July 21, 2004, 05:15:29 PM »
I have the same problem, as an undergrad I only had one seminar course and the mental professor never ever showed up after the first class.  He actually advised us not to visit him during his office hours!  I guess that's how arrogant you become after receiving a PhD from Stanford.  Also, I never had a undergrad class smaller than 50 people.

I was talking to a prospective graduate student about LORs awhile back and he said that most schools understand that it is very hard for undergrads to obtain good LORs, especially those from a public institution.  Hence, most schools will not punish you for handing in generic LORs.  Of course having great LORs wouldn't hurt, but if your creditentials are already above the 50th percentile then I wouldn't worry too much about it. 
When in doubt on the LSAT, always choose F as the answer.

jacy85

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Re: Anyone else really nervous about getting LOR's??
« Reply #18 on: July 21, 2004, 06:01:13 PM »
While I agree that it's really tough getting very personal recs from professors when you go to a very large university (I went to BU, and most of my classes had over 30 people.  I can count on one hand the number of classes with >20 students I was in), I think LORs afe very important, since the fact that your numbers are over the 50th percentile doesn't count for overly much.  Unless your stats are over the 75th percentile in both lsat and gpa, you're not a sure thing, and even then, it's not unheard of for people to get rejected for negative LORs or a bad personal statement.

Also, was it a prospective mastars/phd student you were talking to, or a prospective law student?  I think applying to a masters program is radically different than applying to law school, with ls obviously being more competitive.  With that being said, it's imparative that you have good recs, since if it comes down to considering two similar candidates for 1 seat, with idential numbers and both have a great PS, the one has two absolutely stellar recs would probably be given the seat over someone with average and generic recs. 

Overall, with the most recent stats that have been posted on the board, more people took this past june lsat than ever before, if I read the posts correctly.  If that's true, while we can't assume that it will be tougher to get in this year, I think it's safe to think that it'll be just as competitive as last year.  That being the case, admission to some for their top choice schools can actually come down to their PS and their LORs, even though we all say on the board that it's only a numbers game.

I was talking to a prospective graduate student about LORs awhile back and he said that most schools understand that it is very hard for undergrads to obtain good LORs, especially those from a public institution.  Hence, most schools will not punish you for handing in generic LORs.  Of course having great LORs wouldn't hurt, but if your creditentials are already above the 50th percentile then I wouldn't worry too much about it. 

smujd2007

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Re: Anyone else really nervous about getting LOR's??
« Reply #19 on: July 21, 2004, 06:50:43 PM »
Muhkia - on your second post for the third letter of rec, I think you should go for it.  I think that anything that sets you apart from the pile of applications will help, especially if you have a solid GPA and LSAT score, and given the fact that you have been out of school for a little while. I like Jacy85's idea of having one professional, one academic reference, and then having the one from the professor at the community college.
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