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Author Topic: LSAT  Guidance  (Read 1341 times)

Pun

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LSAT  Guidance
« on: December 09, 2002, 06:26:22 AM »
Hi y'all,

I was wondering if anyone was willing to offer some advice. Lsat year, I decided no to puruse medical school despite good academic credentials: my MCAT (80th percentile) and GPA (3.63).  I was getting tired of studying tradtional sciences and I did'nt want to spend another four years memorizing organ systems and learning obscure microbial names. To make a long story short I decided to pursue a career in law specifically patent law. Patent law would allow me to stay close to the filed of science without having to do all the clinical aspects of science. Furthermore, the compensation in this field is compartive to the medical profession so it seemed like the next logical step.

Anyhow, not to be cocky but I'm fairly intelligent. I graudated with on the Dean's Honours list in molecular biology but I can't seem to achieve a decent score on these paractice tests. I have taken three thus far, and the highest I have scored is 145. I've never been able to read or think fast and I think  that is the problem. I am concerned because I want to achieve a 160 but that seems well out of reach.

Has anyone improved drastically from their first few practice tests or should you be scoring reasonably high if you want to achieve your target score. For instance, in order to realistically achive a 160 should'nt my current score be in the 150's. I guess I'm discouraged because the MCAT seemed much more tougher, yet I can't even achive a respectable score on the LSAT.

Furthermore, does anyone know a good strategy for attacking assumption questions. Also how can I improve my Reading comprehension speed. Currenly I can attempt two passages with 100% accuracy. I usually run out of time before I can begin the third.

Can anyone provide some guidance......

Thanks Kindly.

anon

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Re: LSAT  Guidance
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2002, 07:55:11 AM »
One thing - are you taking actual old LSATs, or LSATs from book?  I took a bunch of LSATs from a book and found that the scoring was always really low (I got almost 10 points higher on the real LSAT, and on the one old LSAT that I tried).  I think the books purposely downscale the scoring so it looks like you've improved when it's time for the real test.

Pun

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Re: LSAT  Guidance
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2002, 08:15:16 AM »
I am using old "acutal"  LSAT material. I only study from question published on previous lsat's.

dogtown

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Re: LSAT  Guidance
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2002, 02:19:11 PM »
Pun,

If you scored in the 80th percentile (is that about a 31?) on the MCAT, you should be able to handle the reading comprehension section on the LSAT. The reading comp. section on the MCAT is both longer and harder.  If you are scoring low on the reading comp. section of the LSAT, are you doing something differently than you did on the MCAT?  Otherwise, I dont know why that portion of your score would be lower on the LSAT than the MCAT. Improving your score on this section is hard to do.  I would focus on the games if you need to score extra points.

Your doing a 145 but want a 160.  I would shoot for a 150.  The 5 point difference here will improve your percentile from about the 25th to the 50th percentile, and its realistic that you could do this.  If possible, try for a 155.  With a high GPA in the sciences and an average LSAT, you can get admitted to a 2nd tier school.

The thing is, if you want to do patent law, you dont have to go to a first tier school.  Most law students are not eligible to sit for the patent bar - so you are already in a special group.

But think about this, too.  The patent bar is a 100 question test that requires you get 70 right to pass.  It has an average pass rate of between 17-45%.  No kidding.  It is a beast.  You should make sure that you like the law before you take the step, because the patent bar may not be realistic.  

Other options might include taking a prep course.  keep studting.  Take full length times exams, not just portions here and there.  Practice the games - this is the section where most people improve their scores the most.

The bottom line here though is that you need to get at LEAST a 150.  And a 153-55 if possible.

Im was in your same situation.  I had a biochem. degree with a very good GPA and a mediocre LSAT.  After 1.5 years at a second tier school things are looking GREAT.  If its want you really want to do - just keep working at it.