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Author Topic: In-state vs. Out-of-State  (Read 1767 times)

notmarcadler1

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In-state vs. Out-of-State
« on: July 13, 2004, 10:06:59 PM »
Thank you for the answers to my previous post, but I have one more question.  Does anyone know whether state law schools prefer in-state residents rather than out-of-state residents?  I was wondering if they prefer out-of-state students b/c they will pay more and save that state money for other in-state students.  But then again, I imagine it doesn't work quite like that.  Does anyone know any better?

winstonsmith

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Re: In-state vs. Out-of-State
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2004, 05:11:46 PM »
It depends on the school. Many try very hard to have a certain percent of the class from in state and a certain percent from out. For instance UNC wants 75% from in state and 25% from out of state. Whether they "prefer" one or the other I guess depends on how many applicants they get from each. At UNC I believe they get about half and half so it is quite a bit easier to get in as a resident than not.

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Re: In-state vs. Out-of-State
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2004, 05:14:05 PM »
I heard from other posters on this board that Boalt and UCLA have no preference and no quotas.
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Anti_Ivy

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Re: In-state vs. Out-of-State
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2004, 05:23:00 PM »
Does anyone know whether state law schools prefer in-state residents rather than out-of-state residents?  I was wondering if they prefer out-of-state students b/c they will pay more and save that state money for other in-state students.  But then again, I imagine it doesn't work quite like that.  Does anyone know any better?

University of Texas Law prefers Texas residents.  It is required by state law that no more than 20% of all students be out-of-state.  I even spoke with an adcom at UT law who said that, when using online calculators, a TX resident should add 0.2 to her/his UGPA and 1-3 points to her/his LSAT score.  He added that if one were not a TX resident s/he should subtract 0.2 from her/his UGPA and 1-3 points from her/his LSAT.  {Thus, TX residents have a MAJOR advantage in the admissions process}

I also saw something similar in "How to get into Top Law Schools": [a UT adcom was] quoted saying pretty much the same thing.


This applies to most non-TX residents :  A non-TX resident would probably have a better shot at a admission at a top 14 school than at UT.

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Re: In-state vs. Out-of-State
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2004, 08:20:07 PM »
Oops, I replied on the other thread...but here it is, FWIW:

Some schools do, some schools don't.  I have never heard of an in-state applicant being less likely to be admitted, but some state schools are required by the state to have a certain percent of the class filled by state residents.  Thus your chances of admission are improved if you're in-state, and working against you slightly if you're not.  This is the case at UVA, for example, and why I am glad I am a VA resident!  See Montauk for more info.

lexylit

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Re: In-state vs. Out-of-State
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2004, 06:31:33 PM »
i just read last night that texas treats 90 out-of-staters as in-staters, charging them reduced tuition. did you guys know about that? do any other state schools have that kind of tuition break?