Law School Discussion

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BassDesire

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« on: November 15, 2005, 06:44:28 PM »
 :-X

The Dread Pirate Roberts

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Re: Finding % yield numbers
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2005, 07:16:42 PM »
They're interesting.

It definitely goes to show why it's easier to get into some schools than others.

And damn Yale has a high yield.  No wonder they never go to their waitlist.  But I already kind of knew that...

Electric Counterpoint

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Re: Finding % yield numbers
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2005, 07:25:15 PM »
This seems like a not entirely bad place to ask my question: What's yield -- rate of matriculation, right? So then, what's yield protection?


Just so as I'm not completely derailing the thread, I've got a Yale Law bulletin from this year that says 87% of admittees accept and attend. So basically that's crazy high, percentage-wise.

Electric Counterpoint

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Re: Finding % yield numbers
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2005, 07:30:55 PM »
This seems like a not entirely bad place to ask my question: What's yield -- rate of matriculation, right? So then, what's yield protection?


Just so as I'm not completely derailing the thread, I've got a Yale Law bulletin from this year that says 87% of admittees accept and attend. So basically that's crazy high, percentage-wise.

Yield is in indeed matriculation rate.  Yield protection is when a law school rejects someone it would normally accept for fear that they wouldn't matriculate anyway.  So, if someone with a 180/4.0 applied to (I don't know) Cornell, Cornell would know that this person would likely get into 10 schools better than Cornell.  They might reject him/her rather than have him/her count against their yield.

Ooh, OK, that makes sense. It's bastardly on their parts from my perspective, but it makes sense.

practiceboy02

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Re: Finding % yield numbers
« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2005, 09:53:18 AM »
I'm actually surprised that Harvard's is that high

Re: Finding % yield numbers
« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2005, 10:57:42 AM »
Bass-- (or anyone)

How do you find these % yield numbers?  I think it's sort of difficult, as the schools don't really want anyone to know that, in fact, their yield isn't 100%.  They always say things like '6000 applications for 300 spots'.  I suppose if you had the USNWR thing with the acceptance rate, and then the number of raw apps and the size of the entering class, you could do the math...

And practiceboy, why are you surprised that Harvard's yield is so high?  Are you planning on going somewhere else? 

The Dread Pirate Roberts

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Re: Finding % yield numbers
« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2005, 11:03:29 AM »
Bass-- (or anyone)

How do you find these % yield numbers?  I think it's sort of difficult, as the schools don't really want anyone to know that, in fact, their yield isn't 100%.  They always say things like '6000 applications for 300 spots'.  I suppose if you had the USNWR thing with the acceptance rate, and then the number of raw apps and the size of the entering class, you could do the math...

LSAC publishes the number accepted and number attending, so from there the math is nice and easy.

Re: Finding % yield numbers
« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2005, 03:04:24 PM »
Some that I would expect to have high yields:

BYU 151/247 61%
Notre Dame 178/516 34%
Pepperdine 250/879 28%
Regent 188/309 61%
Texas 425/955 45%

And these:
Cooley 1428/2921 49%
Touro 273/684 40%
Pontific Catholic 192/288 67%