Law School Discussion

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« on: October 26, 2005, 01:34:07 AM »
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Re: Vermont Law School pays price for banning of military recruiters
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2005, 12:31:40 PM »
http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051025/NEWS01/510250314/1009&theme=

what do people think about this?  how does this differ from getting donations from a big law firm, but then losing that money because you ban them from recruiting on campus for some reason?  does the government have a right to decide how to distribute their grants?

Yes, the gov't does this all the time.  Federal highway dollars make many states bend over to Uncle Sam's wishes...

Re: Vermont Law School pays price for banning of military recruiters
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2005, 11:27:15 PM »
http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051025/NEWS01/510250314/1009&theme=

what do people think about this?  how does this differ from getting donations from a big law firm, but then losing that money because you ban them from recruiting on campus for some reason?  does the government have a right to decide how to distribute their grants?

I am ambivalent on this whole situation.  This is a tough job market, and students are being denied the opportunity to work for a great employer where they will get amazing job skills (at places like SLS and NYU, the *students* that signed up for the interviews were heckled by their classmates, etc).  At the same time, the military's outright discrimination against the LGBT community is contra most law school's policies.  Unfortunately, there isn't a happy medium in this dispute, and the people who are truly affected are the students that genuinely aspire to work for JAG. 

Personally, I think the military should revise its policy, but that is because I don't agree with blatant discrimination.

skaiserbrown

Re: Vermont Law School pays price for banning of military recruiters
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2005, 08:28:42 AM »
how is it anti-military to protest policies of discrimination?

we have a lot of gay people in our armed forces. we should let them serve openly.

skaiserbrown

Re: Vermont Law School pays price for banning of military recruiters
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2005, 08:41:22 AM »
1. i didn't say it is anti-military, but if you have people who are probably liberals (they're at law schools, after all) protesting the presence of a military recruiter, most people are not going to think about the abstract discrimination that they are protesting; they will assume (especially since these peoples are liberals and people have pre-conceived ideas of what liberals are like) that they are protesting the soldiers themselves.

2. i'm not saying that what you say is not true, but what on what are you basing it?

1. well, you could say that for any sort of protest, really. and people do say it, it's incredibly hard to avoid people saying you're anti-troops or anti-military when one says, for example, they're against the war in iraq. it doesn't really matter to them that somebody think we should have focused more on afghanistan before attacking a toothless dictator. all they here is "anti-military"- and then they try to make sure everyone else hears it too. my point was more that it shouldn't prevent people from doing what they think is right, and i might have misread you as saying that the left is anti-military.

2. anecdotal evidence. mainly from people who i know that served who either were well aware of gays who served with them, or in some cases from gay or trans people who served. also, there have been instances over the past half decade of people being drummed out of the army for coming out while still in the service, the instance that leaps to mind are the half dozen translators we discharged in '02 or '03 (IIRC).

Re: Vermont Law School pays price for banning of military recruiters
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2005, 09:41:13 AM »

hmmm, i agree with that.  i don't like fed govt pushing legislation on state govts.  but then it's not a perfect analogy, since we're talking about private organizations (law schools) and not states, right?

right. i didnt mean it as a response to the OP... just to paperbackwriter's post.

Strings are always attached to gov't money.

Re: Vermont Law School pays price for banning of military recruiters
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2005, 11:05:37 AM »
It is government money, unfortunately conditions come with it.

If those who are against "Don't Ask, Don't tell" really want to get rid the policy, they should go after politicians and not the military. After all, politicians put the policy into effect (Bill Clinton, and the Republican Congress), and they could end it. They also forget that the military takes orders from civilian politicians, not the other way around.

Going after military recruiters will not do anything, unless there is a total ban from ABA schools. That is unlikely, because there are some schools that are more open to them than others. By harassing students, protesters are only scaring away ambivalent recruits (that may actually try to change the military's view of the policy from the inside), while making more "homophobic" recruits more determined to join.