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Author Topic: Admissions calculators  (Read 280442 times)

lightessenz

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Re: Admissions calculators
« Reply #30 on: October 24, 2005, 12:59:15 AM »
I have a problem using those calculators because I have 2 lsat scores, and some schools average and some dont. Thus I put the higher score and the average score and see what results the two bring up.  It is still only an approximation.

LawyersGunnersnMoney

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Re: Admissions calculators
« Reply #31 on: October 24, 2005, 12:02:25 PM »
"I think the LSAC's indicator might be pretty good. It came out about right for all my friend's decisions when he applied last year. That's pretty anecdotal though."

What do you mean exactly?  everything over %50 he got and everything under %50 he didn't?

Thikighoros

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Re: Admissions calculators
« Reply #32 on: October 24, 2005, 12:10:16 PM »
LSAC's indicator is very good, and here's why. Most law schools (except for top "tier 1" and some newly given provisional accreditation) give their admission numbers directly to LSAC for statistical purposes.

From what I know, LSAC's site uses the raw average of your scores. However, most schools take into consideration the context behind the scores. For example, at the New York LSAC Forum, a good number of reps from the various schools I went to told me they would consider the higher score if it was at least 5-6 points from your other one(s). Also, if you took your exam in 2004, or 2003, and you took the exam again in June, or October 2005, they would likely put greater emphasis on the recent one. So their use of a admissions calculator is at best, pessimistic.

I'd recommend that you should get the ABA guide in book form. It gives the same info as in the pdfs but it also tells you how many of a school's admitted applicants went there. It also give financial aid info, financial aid stats, bar passage rates and attrition rates (academic or otherwise).

Als the book provides for every school. There may be some schools that may not have had in mind (and no, I'm not talking about "tier 4" schools) that you could apply and get into. In my opion, beyond the national schools there is very little that separates "tier 2" from "tier 3". Besides, one of the most important things about a school is it's bar passage rate. If you don't pass the bar, then your JD degree is pratically useless.

The ISBN is: 0976024519
$26.00 @ Barnes & Noble, but you could get it for cheaper online (amazon.com, barnesandnoble.com, etc.)Shipping/Transit time should be about two days.

If info that the book provides is all online then I stand corrected.
I look forward to the day that I could say (God willing):

Είναι δικηγόρος στρατιωτικός.
(I am a military lawyer).

www.lawschoolnumbers.com/display.php?user=Thikighoros

Thikighoros

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Re: Admissions calculators
« Reply #33 on: October 24, 2005, 12:17:33 PM »
Remember, the admissions calculator tells you your chances right off the bat. The other components your your application (LOR's, Personal statement, etc.) would push one toward acceptance or denial of admission.
I look forward to the day that I could say (God willing):

Είναι δικηγόρος στρατιωτικός.
(I am a military lawyer).

www.lawschoolnumbers.com/display.php?user=Thikighoros

Robespierre

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Re: Admissions calculators
« Reply #34 on: October 24, 2005, 01:50:58 PM »
They're useful to give you an idea of your chances when you're new to the process.  But I don't think they're very accurate, because:

1.   They are all based on data at least two years old.

2.   They treat all applicants as a single pool when in fact several classes of applicants are held to different standards (in-staters at state schools, URMs, legacies).

3.   They ignore all soft factors.

4.   They're all based on information provided by either schools or applicants.  Schools manipulate data to protect their USNWR rankings and applicants are known to stretch the truth for psychological reasons.
Penn Law Class of '09

Thikighoros

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Re: Admissions calculators
« Reply #35 on: October 25, 2005, 08:34:13 AM »
They're useful to give you an idea of your chances when you're new to the process.  But I don't think they're very accurate, because:

1.   They are all based on data at least two years old.

2.   They treat all applicants as a single pool when in fact several classes of applicants are held to different standards (in-staters at state schools, URMs, legacies).

3.   They ignore all soft factors.

4.   They're all based on information provided by either schools or applicants.  Schools manipulate data to protect their USNWR rankings and applicants are known to stretch the truth for psychological reasons.
This is all correct. But these things should be taken into consideration.

1) In addition, all of the other guides (USN&WR, Barron's, etc.) use the same information. The USN&WR guide uses the data and ranks everything. It's even more general than the ABA-LSAC guide.

2) The fact that the data may be a year or two old shows the magnitude of information that LSAC has to deal with in regards to the compiling the information for guides.

3)In consideration of the second point, it would take even longer for the guide to come out with information (and consequently the information would be even older) if LSAC decided to look for such factors as URM's, and other soft factors. Also, in considering applicants, each law school has it own standard for including such factors. For LSAC to gather such information and put it together, error-check it, print and distribute could take up to four years. All of this is assuming that the schools would even give information on such factors.

4) Even with the age of the data, usually don't rapidly change their admissions criteria in regards to GPA and LSAT within the span of one or two years. The only such case would be when a school has recently gained full or provisional accreditation.

There are there are a myriad of reasons why an applicant is accepted or rejected. It isn't the ABA-LSAC guide's job to list or even account for them. The benefit of using the guide is that the data is laid out and is very specific, more specific than the other guides are. You would want the application process as manageable as possible. Specificity does that.
I look forward to the day that I could say (God willing):

Είναι δικηγόρος στρατιωτικός.
(I am a military lawyer).

www.lawschoolnumbers.com/display.php?user=Thikighoros

FossilJ

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Re: Admissions calculators
« Reply #36 on: October 25, 2005, 02:52:41 PM »
If info that the book provides is all online then I stand corrected.

'Tis.  It's provided under the school's information if you click on that school's name on the site.
Pish, J only wants to waste YOUR time.  Get wise.

toinore

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Re: Admissions calculators
« Reply #37 on: October 26, 2005, 08:49:22 PM »
Sorry to ask this as I KNOW it was posted, but I did a search and couldn't find it...does anyone know the link to the  chart showing the different colored dots for "accepted," "rejected," "waitlisted?"

The Dread Pirate Roberts

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Re: Admissions calculators
« Reply #38 on: October 26, 2005, 09:02:51 PM »
Sorry to ask this as I KNOW it was posted, but I did a search and couldn't find it...does anyone know the link to the  chart showing the different colored dots for "accepted," "rejected," "waitlisted?"

On law school numbers?  Well, I don't know if there's an official chart, but you can show and hide each category, which tells you what they mean.

And, for the record, it's moderately intuitive: red = reject, green = accept, yellow = waitlist, gray = pending.

ilovetheLSAT

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Re: Admissions calculators
« Reply #39 on: October 26, 2005, 11:23:20 PM »
What about when they look like a 'star' does that mean $$$? more than one app with the same stats?