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Author Topic: A "what are my chances at X school" of a different color  (Read 12856 times)

gosox

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Re: A "what are my chances at X school" of a different color
« Reply #110 on: October 21, 2005, 03:32:29 PM »
yo

misery

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Re: A "what are my chances at X school" of a different color
« Reply #111 on: November 03, 2005, 05:00:55 PM »
Quote from: John Galt link=topic=44001.msg790202#msg790202
Second, Sanders fails to point out that on a curve system such as most law schools, it is not necessarily the overall quality of work that results in lower grades, but just in comparison to the other students. At a high caliber schools, brilliant students with exceptional quality of work are going to find themselves in the bottom 10% simply because someone has to occupy the bottom. Where are the other 49% of black students falling? If blacks were so unqualified to be in such an institution in the first place, I would expect the proportion in the bottom 10% to be higher.

You forget to point out that the curve system takes into account a gaussian distribution of grades, something like 15/70/15 a/b/c is a common ratio in classes from what I've heard.  Regardless of the actual curve, grades are rarely, if not never linearly distributed anyway.  Therefore, the students on the bottom are signficantly worse than the students on the middle, and similarly, the students on the top perform significantly better than those in the middle... anyone who took the lsat should know what a gaussian curve is, right?

The Dread Pirate Roberts

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Re: A "what are my chances at X school" of a different color
« Reply #112 on: November 03, 2005, 06:23:54 PM »
anyone who took the lsat should know what a gaussian curve is, right?

Not really...

misery

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Re: A "what are my chances at X school" of a different color
« Reply #113 on: November 03, 2005, 11:03:53 PM »
Just in case you're not being sarcastic...

Gaussian = bell curve.  Compare the bottom 10% to 10-20% and then compare 40-50% to 50-60% with any grade distribution, there is a much greater disparity in the former than the latter.

The Dread Pirate Roberts

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Re: A "what are my chances at X school" of a different color
« Reply #114 on: November 04, 2005, 08:56:54 AM »
Just in case you're not being sarcastic...

I do know what it is, but I wasn't being sarcastic; I don't think there's any relationship between knowing that and taking the LSAT.  I think the last time I thought about it was a high school math class, and it's the sort of thing I could easily imagine not remembering.

SkullTatt

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Re: A "what are my chances at X school" of a different color
« Reply #115 on: November 04, 2005, 02:41:46 PM »
I don't know what a Gaussian curve is, and have never known. Not that I'm proud of it, but... I definitely have taken the LSAT, and scored in the 93rd percentile!

misery

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Re: A "what are my chances at X school" of a different color
« Reply #116 on: November 04, 2005, 05:58:18 PM »
Just in case you're not being sarcastic...

I do know what it is, but I wasn't being sarcastic; I don't think there's any relationship between knowing that and taking the LSAT.  I think the last time I thought about it was a high school math class, and it's the sort of thing I could easily imagine not remembering.

You're right, but with the amount of time people on this board obsess over LSATs (I usually hang out in the study for lsat section, and I starting reading this board based on that section actually), I thought it was reasonable that those on this board would know.  Anyway, my point was that being in the bottom 10% is not something that can be brushed off as simply having 'tough competition,' because when you are in the bottom 10%, you aren't even close to being competition for the rest of the class.