Law School Discussion

Fear of never passing The Bar

Fear of never passing The Bar
« on: October 15, 2005, 03:32:18 AM »
(assuming you plan to practice in California)

Does anybody fear never passing the difficult calif. bar? or fear it might take them years to do it? and if so, what is the point of law school?

anybody know what the average lsat score is of people who don't pass the bar? or the minimum lsat generally necessary to pass the bar?

lsdaccount

Re: Fear of never passing The Bar
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2005, 07:37:18 AM »
I'll probably be taking New York, which is arguably worse.  I'm not worried though. 

Re: Fear of never passing The Bar
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2005, 01:49:38 PM »
I'm really not too concerned about it. The bar passage rates at all the schools I'm looking to go to, even the lower ones, are really high. I figure it's just people on the very low-end of their graduating classes who don't pass and I don't plan on being anywhere remotely near that.

practiceboy02

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Re: Fear of never passing The Bar
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2005, 01:55:52 PM »
I think that if you want to practice in DC, you have to pass three bars: DC, VA, and MD.

Re: Fear of never passing The Bar
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2005, 01:59:37 PM »
some people also say  the lsat is worse than the bar.

Well, in some ways it's worse and some ways better than the LSAT. On the one hand, if you go to a good school, pretty much everyone passes and since there's no gradiation, just pass/fail, it won't really seem like it's determining your future quite as much. On the other hand, the Bar is much longer and it takes months to get your score back. It certainly won't be a peach.

Esq

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Re: Fear of never passing The Bar
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2005, 02:15:36 PM »
I think that if you want to practice in DC, you have to pass three bars: DC, VA, and MD.

I am not certain, but I don't think that you have to pass three bar exams in order to practice in DC. If you have more information, please post about it.  Here is a link to information about the DC bar exam. Also, for anyone else interested in the state-specific requirements for all state bar exams, the link has information about those as well.

http://www.barbri.com/states/dc/index.htm

practiceboy02

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Re: Fear of never passing The Bar
« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2005, 02:18:28 PM »
I think that if you want to practice in DC, you have to pass three bars: DC, VA, and MD.

I am not certain, but I don't think that you have to pass three bar exams in order to practice in DC. If you have more information, please post about it.  Here is a link to information about the DC bar exam. Also, for anyone else interested in the state-specific requirements for all state bar exams, the link has information about those as well.

http://www.barbri.com/states/dc/index.htm

Actually, you're probably right... I'm just thinking about one of my PowerScore teachers who worked for a large firm.  I don't know why, but he said he had to pass all 3

Re: Fear of never passing The Bar
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2005, 02:25:46 PM »

vitaminwater

Re: Fear of never passing The Bar
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2005, 12:10:32 AM »
i heard someone say that the CA bar was the easiest of all bars.

is that true?

lsdaccount

Re: Fear of never passing The Bar
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2005, 10:53:00 AM »
I think that if you want to practice in DC, you have to pass three bars: DC, VA, and MD.

I am not certain, but I don't think that you have to pass three bar exams in order to practice in DC. If you have more information, please post about it.  Here is a link to information about the DC bar exam. Also, for anyone else interested in the state-specific requirements for all state bar exams, the link has information about those as well.

http://www.barbri.com/states/dc/index.htm

This is true.  Opposing counsel on a case we just finished conisisted of two different firms.  One firm was in MD where the client lived, the other firm was admitted in D.C. and NY.        The D.C. and MD firm worked together on a number of interstate matters.