Law School Discussion

Yale Law

almuhajaba

Re: Yale Law
« Reply #410 on: March 05, 2006, 12:25:33 PM »
they're teaching you how to think about the law.

Nothing is quite as valuable as that, I think. For the rest, there's bar prep.


seconded.

I think most people underestimate just *how* helpful it is to learn theory. I used the theories that I learned in freshman political theory and philosophy classes for the rest of my undergrad years and constantly drew upon those fundamental ideas when trying to analyze historical events.


oh and Bass, I totally agree with your love of COAP, it's freaking awesome and the name says it all ;D

Kansas

Re: Yale Law
« Reply #411 on: March 08, 2006, 09:38:33 AM »
HEY HEY!!! Some of us haven't gotten the binder yet...don't ruin it.

So... are we allowed to discuss the binder yet?  ;)

Re: Yale Law
« Reply #412 on: March 08, 2006, 10:41:31 AM »
what kind of public interest/social justice curriculum do they have? I was looking at the website and it seemed pretty sparse; not a program or journal title with the word "race" in it, for instance. Lots of stuff seems to have an international focus, or environmental...which is great...but I was just curious if there's anything more up my alley (which is like...social inequality, racial/economic justice, etc). For instance, would you say they can compare to HLS in this regard?

Here's the truth.  There is not much institutional dedication to race as a social justice issue. Friends have tried to start a journal on race and the law and met with cool reception from high-ups in the administration.  Race scholarship, but especially critical race scholarship, is looked upon as being less scholarly than other types of scholarship (esp. case-parsing and, of course, the hegemonic law and economics.)

All of that said, it's not *too*much different than the situation at comparable schools.  Maybe HLS is a little better on this front, but then you're competing with an assload of students to get those two profs' attention.  At least here, there is the freedom to formulate what you're missing out on.  And admittedly, with all of the Kiwi Camara drama and the fact that no profs are good role models for what I want to do...ehh...well, I'm on the negative swing at the moment.  I think that in the end I still would have come here though.  And the caliber of the students DEFINITELY helps make up for what the institution itself is sorely lacking.

John Galt

Re: Yale Law
« Reply #413 on: March 08, 2006, 11:34:27 AM »
what kind of public interest/social justice curriculum do they have? I was looking at the website and it seemed pretty sparse; not a program or journal title with the word "race" in it, for instance. Lots of stuff seems to have an international focus, or environmental...which is great...but I was just curious if there's anything more up my alley (which is like...social inequality, racial/economic justice, etc). For instance, would you say they can compare to HLS in this regard?

Here's the truth.  There is not much institutional dedication to race as a social justice issue. Friends have tried to start a journal on race and the law and met with cool reception from high-ups in the administration.  Race scholarship, but especially critical race scholarship, is looked upon as being less scholarly than other types of scholarship (esp. case-parsing and, of course, the hegemonic law and economics.)

All of that said, it's not *too*much different than the situation at comparable schools.  Maybe HLS is a little better on this front, but then you're competing with an assload of students to get those two profs' attention.  At least here, there is the freedom to formulate what you're missing out on.  And admittedly, with all of the Kiwi Camara drama and the fact that no profs are good role models for what I want to do...ehh...well, I'm on the negative swing at the moment.  I think that in the end I still would have come here though.  And the caliber of the students DEFINITELY helps make up for what the institution itself is sorely lacking.

Interesting. Do you think the caliber of students at yale is significantly different than the caliber of students at Harvard? In your opinion is there an obvious difference? I've been wondering about this lately.

Re: Yale Law
« Reply #414 on: March 08, 2006, 01:30:48 PM »
what kind of public interest/social justice curriculum do they have? I was looking at the website and it seemed pretty sparse; not a program or journal title with the word "race" in it, for instance. Lots of stuff seems to have an international focus, or environmental...which is great...but I was just curious if there's anything more up my alley (which is like...social inequality, racial/economic justice, etc). For instance, would you say they can compare to HLS in this regard?

Here's the truth.  There is not much institutional dedication to race as a social justice issue. Friends have tried to start a journal on race and the law and met with cool reception from high-ups in the administration.  Race scholarship, but especially critical race scholarship, is looked upon as being less scholarly than other types of scholarship (esp. case-parsing and, of course, the hegemonic law and economics.)

All of that said, it's not *too*much different than the situation at comparable schools.  Maybe HLS is a little better on this front, but then you're competing with an assload of students to get those two profs' attention.  At least here, there is the freedom to formulate what you're missing out on.  And admittedly, with all of the Kiwi Camara drama and the fact that no profs are good role models for what I want to do...ehh...well, I'm on the negative swing at the moment.  I think that in the end I still would have come here though.  And the caliber of the students DEFINITELY helps make up for what the institution itself is sorely lacking.

Interesting. Do you think the caliber of students at yale is significantly different than the caliber of students at Harvard? In your opinion is there an obvious difference? I've been wondering about this lately.

I don't go to HLS, but I'd have to say YES.  When I visited the law schools it was quite apparent.  HLS students are just as smart as YLS students; some are smarter.  But generally, YLS students have done more interesting things with their time.  YLS students did not get in because they got lucky and got a 177--there's a deeper reason they got here. Makes life a lot cooler.

(I'm already prepared to get blasted by some HLS troll but I am too hurried to soften this language! :))

2Lacoste

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Re: Yale Law
« Reply #415 on: March 08, 2006, 01:36:42 PM »
what kind of public interest/social justice curriculum do they have? I was looking at the website and it seemed pretty sparse; not a program or journal title with the word "race" in it, for instance. Lots of stuff seems to have an international focus, or environmental...which is great...but I was just curious if there's anything more up my alley (which is like...social inequality, racial/economic justice, etc). For instance, would you say they can compare to HLS in this regard?

Here's the truth.  There is not much institutional dedication to race as a social justice issue. Friends have tried to start a journal on race and the law and met with cool reception from high-ups in the administration.  Race scholarship, but especially critical race scholarship, is looked upon as being less scholarly than other types of scholarship (esp. case-parsing and, of course, the hegemonic law and economics.)

All of that said, it's not *too*much different than the situation at comparable schools.  Maybe HLS is a little better on this front, but then you're competing with an assload of students to get those two profs' attention.  At least here, there is the freedom to formulate what you're missing out on.  And admittedly, with all of the Kiwi Camara drama and the fact that no profs are good role models for what I want to do...ehh...well, I'm on the negative swing at the moment.  I think that in the end I still would have come here though.  And the caliber of the students DEFINITELY helps make up for what the institution itself is sorely lacking.

Interesting. Do you think the caliber of students at yale is significantly different than the caliber of students at Harvard? In your opinion is there an obvious difference? I've been wondering about this lately.

I don't go to HLS, but I'd have to say YES.  When I visited the law schools it was quite apparent.  HLS students are just as smart as YLS students; some are smarter.  But generally, YLS students have done more interesting things with their time.  YLS students did not get in because they got lucky and got a 177--there's a deeper reason they got here. Makes life a lot cooler.

(I'm already prepared to get blasted by some HLS troll but I am too hurried to soften this language! :))

BLAST!  If I can persuade a Truman or two to come to HLS over YLS, we'll have cool people too!   ;D

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Re: Yale Law
« Reply #416 on: March 08, 2006, 01:40:15 PM »
Although I definitely need to be reading Property, I will quickly add on to what Mobell said:

Yes, the caliber of students is different at YLS.  Caliber does not equal intelligence.  There are smart people at both places, and one might argue that Harvard, since it consists of 600+ people per class, has more intelligent people.  But, when you consider that Yalies tend to be very accomplished both academically and from a holistic perspective, and when you consider that 90+% of the school consists of these people (whereas at Harvard, they are more spread out), you definitely get a very different caliber of students.  If you can imagine it, Yale is both a very intense and very laid-back place.

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Re: Yale Law
« Reply #417 on: March 08, 2006, 02:54:21 PM »
what kind of public interest/social justice curriculum do they have? I was looking at the website and it seemed pretty sparse; not a program or journal title with the word "race" in it, for instance. Lots of stuff seems to have an international focus, or environmental...which is great...but I was just curious if there's anything more up my alley (which is like...social inequality, racial/economic justice, etc). For instance, would you say they can compare to HLS in this regard?

Here's the truth.  There is not much institutional dedication to race as a social justice issue. Friends have tried to start a journal on race and the law and met with cool reception from high-ups in the administration.  Race scholarship, but especially critical race scholarship, is looked upon as being less scholarly than other types of scholarship (esp. case-parsing and, of course, the hegemonic law and economics.)

All of that said, it's not *too*much different than the situation at comparable schools.  Maybe HLS is a little better on this front, but then you're competing with an assload of students to get those two profs' attention.  At least here, there is the freedom to formulate what you're missing out on.  And admittedly, with all of the Kiwi Camara drama and the fact that no profs are good role models for what I want to do...ehh...well, I'm on the negative swing at the moment.  I think that in the end I still would have come here though.  And the caliber of the students DEFINITELY helps make up for what the institution itself is sorely lacking.

Thanks for the honesty, that was really informative and probably more candid than anything I could get from a Yale rep. It sounds like you knew what field/topics you were interested when choosing a school last year - did you mention that in your app/personal statement? And, to clarify, are you saying you chose Yale over, say, Harvard, because you preferred their learning environment and student body, even though they leave a lot to be desired in your area of interest?

Also, I can see what you mean about legal scholarship on race being less respected in academic circles and not too popular at Yale but how about more general social justice-related topics like...civil rights law or issues of social stratification? Is the issue of social justice as a whole more embraced than the specific topic of race, in terms of classes offered and professors' interest?

Oh and fill me in, what's the "Kiwi Camara" drama?

3blindmice

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Re: Yale Law
« Reply #418 on: March 08, 2006, 02:58:49 PM »
what kind of public interest/social justice curriculum do they have? I was looking at the website and it seemed pretty sparse; not a program or journal title with the word "race" in it, for instance. Lots of stuff seems to have an international focus, or environmental...which is great...but I was just curious if there's anything more up my alley (which is like...social inequality, racial/economic justice, etc). For instance, would you say they can compare to HLS in this regard?

Here's the truth.  There is not much institutional dedication to race as a social justice issue. Friends have tried to start a journal on race and the law and met with cool reception from high-ups in the administration.  Race scholarship, but especially critical race scholarship, is looked upon as being less scholarly than other types of scholarship (esp. case-parsing and, of course, the hegemonic law and economics.)

All of that said, it's not *too*much different than the situation at comparable schools.  Maybe HLS is a little better on this front, but then you're competing with an assload of students to get those two profs' attention.  At least here, there is the freedom to formulate what you're missing out on.  And admittedly, with all of the Kiwi Camara drama and the fact that no profs are good role models for what I want to do...ehh...well, I'm on the negative swing at the moment.  I think that in the end I still would have come here though.  And the caliber of the students DEFINITELY helps make up for what the institution itself is sorely lacking.

Interesting. Do you think the caliber of students at yale is significantly different than the caliber of students at Harvard? In your opinion is there an obvious difference? I've been wondering about this lately.

I don't go to HLS, but I'd have to say YES.  When I visited the law schools it was quite apparent.  HLS students are just as smart as YLS students; some are smarter.  But generally, YLS students have done more interesting things with their time.  YLS students did not get in because they got lucky and got a 177--there's a deeper reason they got here. Makes life a lot cooler.

(I'm already prepared to get blasted by some HLS troll but I am too hurried to soften this language! :))

BLAST!  If I can persuade a Truman or two to come to HLS over YLS, we'll have cool people too!   ;D

are u plannin to turn yale down for harvard if u get in?

John Galt

Re: Yale Law
« Reply #419 on: March 08, 2006, 03:25:06 PM »
Thanks Mobelle and Alci!

Veeleigh, I still haven't received the binder and I'm on the East Coast. :(