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Author Topic: Were you one of these LSAT test takers?  (Read 68966 times)

dbmuell

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Re: Were you one of these LSAT test takers?
« Reply #100 on: October 06, 2006, 10:47:19 AM »
I was that guy.  I'm actually worried that if my cursive is as illegible as it seemed to be that they would withold my score.  Can this happen?

Cube Farmer

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Re: Were you one of these LSAT test takers?
« Reply #101 on: October 06, 2006, 06:44:20 PM »
I was that guy.  I'm actually worried that if my cursive is as illegible as it seemed to be that they would withold my score.  Can this happen?

I am scared about this as well. I never write in cursive.....Hell, I never write...I nearly type everything. My handwriting is horrible, and I think I only went cursive half way. I guess we will see.
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LSATInsider2

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Re: Were you one of these LSAT test takers?
« Reply #102 on: October 06, 2006, 09:16:15 PM »
If your cursive is illegible, you will get 1) a notice in your email saying your account is on hold and 2) the statement sent to you via mail on which you have to cursive write the blurb again.

Once you send the stuff back to LSAC, your account will reactivated.

lsdreamer

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Re: Were you one of these LSAT test takers?
« Reply #103 on: October 07, 2006, 02:13:36 AM »
I was "can't write in cursive guy." I had to ask for more time to finish the damn thing not once but TWICE. I don't think i've ever blushed more, but dammit, i really couldn't finish the darn thing as fast as everyone else.

Why exactly DO we have to do it in cursive?

Oh no! Our roctor didn't say anything about cursive.  What's up with that? ???

Anyone? Do you think it's a big deal at all? 

iscoredawaitlist

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Re: Were you one of these LSAT test takers?
« Reply #104 on: October 07, 2006, 06:53:22 PM »
my guess is they just glance to make sure it's complete unless they have some reason to believe you've cheated. But that's just a guess. I can't imagine they do a handwriting analysis on every app.

Hey Now

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Re: Were you one of these LSAT test takers?
« Reply #105 on: October 08, 2006, 12:38:42 PM »
I didn't finish that on the SAT or the LSAT.  I doubt they care unless they suspect you of cheating.  Isn't the fricking fingerprint enough ID?
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kenny32

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Re: Were you one of these LSAT test takers?
« Reply #106 on: December 05, 2006, 10:01:06 PM »
BUMP.

i love this thread.
Narrator: You had to give it to him: he had a plan. And it started to make sense, in a Tyler sort of way. No fear. No distractions. The ability to let that which does not matter truly slide.

Tyler Durden: Without pain, without sacrifice, we would have nothing.

lawgirl442

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Re: Were you one of these LSAT test takers?
« Reply #107 on: December 06, 2006, 12:24:51 AM »
My question is, how were you "survival guys" allowed to bring water into the test?  My granola bars I could hide, but if I had a big ol' bottle of water on my desk, I'm confident my nazi proctor would've taken it or made me leave.  I left my nalgene full of water out in the lobby for this very reason.  Had I had a more lenient proctor I would've brought it in.


I was a normal test taker I'd say.  I brought two pencils, a granola bar, a timer (which I rigged not to beep by cutting the sound wire) and like fifteen layers of clothing.

There was no one in my test that really stood out, except one girl who kept raising her hand and making the one proctor come over so she could have whispered conversations with him.

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LawSchoolCutie

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Re: Were you one of these LSAT test takers?
« Reply #108 on: December 06, 2006, 02:53:45 PM »
I was overprepared girl. I had too many "things"

2 mechanical
2 highlighters
10 hb reg pencils
1 sharpener


and I was carrying this dorky seminar bag because the night before the test I realized I couldn't bring a bag that I didn't want to have to worry if it got stolen or dirty..bah!
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kenny32

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Re: Were you one of these LSAT test takers?
« Reply #109 on: December 06, 2006, 05:27:00 PM »
My question is, how were you "survival guys" allowed to bring water into the test?  My granola bars I could hide, but if I had a big ol' bottle of water on my desk, I'm confident my nazi proctor would've taken it or made me leave.  I left my nalgene full of water out in the lobby for this very reason.  Had I had a more lenient proctor I would've brought it in.


I was a normal test taker I'd say.  I brought two pencils, a granola bar, a timer (which I rigged not to beep by cutting the sound wire) and like fifteen layers of clothing.

There was no one in my test that really stood out, except one girl who kept raising her hand and making the one proctor come over so she could have whispered conversations with him.



my proctors let everyone have food and water, it wasnt an issue. also, about 20 people had beeping things, it was kinda funny around 5 minutes before the end of each section they all went off...

i was brooks brothers type, it just makes me feel confident. 
Narrator: You had to give it to him: he had a plan. And it started to make sense, in a Tyler sort of way. No fear. No distractions. The ability to let that which does not matter truly slide.

Tyler Durden: Without pain, without sacrifice, we would have nothing.