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Author Topic: fuel my paranoia please  (Read 1866 times)

lincolnsgrandson

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Re: fuel my paranoia please
« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2005, 10:26:52 AM »
And this comment is based on what? 

, if your grades are competitive, a prior career will put you heads and shoulders above those on your playing field.


Law_Woman

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Re: fuel my paranoia please
« Reply #11 on: September 18, 2005, 10:28:04 AM »
You will never get hired, you'll be so far in debt you'll feel suicidal, you'll end up in a french cafe sipping cheap wine and smoking a cigarette. Did I mention you become an alcoholic and die of lung cancer?

lincolnsgrandson

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Re: fuel my paranoia please
« Reply #12 on: September 18, 2005, 10:34:27 AM »
Actually, that sounds like good qualifications for a lawyer. 

jacy85

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Re: fuel my paranoia please
« Reply #13 on: September 18, 2005, 11:19:11 AM »
It's common sense.  If you interview, and you're being compared to others within range of your gpa/rank, then you'll have a significant asset they don't.  Granted, if you're hovering around the 50% mark of your class, and you're interviewing against the top 10% and those on Law Review or whatever, your work experience isn't going to boost you up to their level, which, based on your comments, seem to be exactly what you were expecting.

And this comment is based on what? 

, if your grades are competitive, a prior career will put you heads and shoulders above those on your playing field.


SkullTatt

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Re: fuel my paranoia please
« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2005, 02:35:48 PM »
Yes, I have a feeling Lincoln's Grandson is looking at that $125,000 figure and he (and "all" the other 2L's and 3L's at his school) expected to make that when they graduated. Those numbers are only for people near the top of their classes (or more if the school is really highly ranked.)

This all kind of fits in with my theory of either (1) if you can't get into a good law school, don't go. Or, at least (2) if you do go to a less-than-stellar law school, realize you are going to have to either work your butt off to find that good job, or manage your own expectations about what your career will be. Which means, you may have a lot of debt and the job you may have will not pay you what you had dreamed, so you need to figure that all out. It happens to law school graduates all the time, and everyone needs to think about that.

up_late

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Re: fuel my paranoia please
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2005, 01:08:28 AM »
I'm a 2L now and will be 32 when I graduate.  I'm a female at a top-15 school, and I have a very-good-but-not-stellar law school record.  My pre-law-school career was OK, but not incredibly impressive.  I have relatively weak interview skills. 

My advice: be very prepared to answer:  "So, you had a great career ... what made you give it up and go to law school?" 

When interviewing this fall, it was hard to answer that question when a firm did not do anything that I could specifically relate to my previous work experience.  I did not have a compelling story about a big transformative moment either.  So I think that hurt me a bit.

But I eventually found a biglaw-paying firm that DOES want me for my background, and I think I will like it there. 

Bottom line -- it depends where you go to law school, how your grades are, and how well you can explain the decision to make the transition to law school.

UWHusky

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Re: fuel my paranoia please
« Reply #16 on: November 04, 2005, 03:11:19 PM »
I'm a 2L now and will be 32 when I graduate.  I'm a female at a top-15 school, and I have a very-good-but-not-stellar law school record.  My pre-law-school career was OK, but not incredibly impressive.  I have relatively weak interview skills. 

My advice: be very prepared to answer:  "So, you had a great career ... what made you give it up and go to law school?" 

When interviewing this fall, it was hard to answer that question when a firm did not do anything that I could specifically relate to my previous work experience.  I did not have a compelling story about a big transformative moment either.  So I think that hurt me a bit.

But I eventually found a biglaw-paying firm that DOES want me for my background, and I think I will like it there. 

Bottom line -- it depends where you go to law school, how your grades are, and how well you can explain the decision to make the transition to law school.

Good for you. I'm glad you posted. What hasn't been discussed here is "why" a big law firm would be a goal for an older student. Most big law firms (like big 4 accounting firms where I am) have a "mill" mentality. You start at the firm as a peon, work 70-80 hours a week and make partner after 5, 10 or 15 years depending. If the firm is strict about their methods and an older student doesn't fit, then you won't get hired. However, many good, smaller fims, will jump at getting a good student who has life experience (real world? what is that exactly?).
3.85 GPA (4.0)Major. No LSAT yet
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ljl3y

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Re: fuel my paranoia please
« Reply #17 on: November 05, 2005, 08:23:50 AM »
I'd like to hear more people's opinions on the subject of "biglaw" vs. little.  I've seen the opinion expressed elsewhere on LSD that smaller firms can be better, not in the immediate salary figure out of school, but in a matter of a few years you can achieve great success.  Also, they can be more supportive environments. ?? Does anyone have any experience in this area or opinion?
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jacy85

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Re: fuel my paranoia please
« Reply #18 on: November 05, 2005, 11:19:53 PM »
I've heard that small firms, while not the huge pay check in the beginning, end up being much more lucrative in the long run.  Various professor, career services staff, and attorneys that have come in for various career service discussions.  I'm not sure where to find the stats, but there were several references to the statistics behind it.  A google search might turn something more concrete up for you.

I think a huge reason for this is because the majority of associates in BIGLAW don't make partner, nor do they stay very long b/c of burnout and dissatisfaction.

kmpnj

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Re: fuel my paranoia please
« Reply #19 on: November 18, 2005, 06:03:40 PM »
Apparently I am in the minority in that I really don't think I want to work for a "big law firm".  I'm going to law school to get a job as a criminal prosecutor.  I've always wanted to work as a DA or US Attorney.  Therefore, I imagine, if I go to law school and kick butt the way that I expect to, then my career as a law enforcement officer will greatly enhance my opportunity to serve in that capacity.  While I certainly want a decent paying job as I am getting sick of Chef Boyardee and Ramen noodles, I'm not getting in this primarily for the paycheck, but to maybe put some really bad people behind bars for the rest of their natural lives. 

So to answer the question, I would think as long as your grades are good, then previous work experience would be a plus.  It shows that you are able to survive in a professional setting and won't do anything stupid.

Good Luck on the Job hunt and keep us posted