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Author Topic: *during* the LSAT: how NOT to freak out  (Read 2810 times)

yiplong

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Re: *during* the LSAT: how NOT to freak out
« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2005, 08:19:04 PM »
it is in a public middle school here in NYC, I don't think I can do that. 

jchyon

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Re: *during* the LSAT: how NOT to freak out
« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2005, 09:38:49 PM »
A public middle school?

Does that mean you get to sit sideways AND you get an entire 2'x3' desk all to yourself?

You gotta love those law school services people for always thinking of us.

gailrules

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Re: *during* the LSAT: how NOT to freak out
« Reply #12 on: September 14, 2005, 09:40:05 PM »
I took the June test (and will probably take the Dec test) in the very same room I took the SAT. Twice.

itsmegark

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Re: *during* the LSAT: how NOT to freak out
« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2005, 09:58:14 PM »
Your first LSAT can be very frustrating since they throw you all these procedures: "don't open the book, don't touch, turn the test back, you will be kicked out and reported if you fail to follow instructions."

But just relax, the proctors will help you if you have questions. 

Luckly I take all my tests at the same test center.

B.K.

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Re: *during* the LSAT: how NOT to freak out
« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2005, 11:19:58 PM »
Whoever suggested yoga is on to something. Although I didn't take it up intentionally as a way of calming during during the LSAT, I did happen to start practicing Bikram (hot) yoga a month or so before the test.  I think the meditation benefits that you get during the class certainly seep into the rest of the parts of your life. Plus, it's an amazing workout.

I've suffered from anxiety attacks ( at random times in my life, not constantly) since high school and I was really worried that I would have one during the test. Deep breathing--sounds cheesy, like Jack Handy advice, but it really works wonders. Oh, and I don't think the idea of a talking to a therapist is far-fetched either, you could only benefit from it.

Good luck.

uwofresh

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Re: *during* the LSAT: how NOT to freak out
« Reply #15 on: September 14, 2005, 11:22:27 PM »
Whoever suggested yoga is on to something. Although I didn't take it up intentionally as a way of calming during during the LSAT, I did happen to start practicing Bikram (hot) yoga a month or so before the test.  I think the meditation benefits that you get during the class certainly seep into the rest of the parts of your life. Plus, it's an amazing workout.

I've suffered from anxiety attacks ( at random times in my life, not constantly) since high school and I was really worried that I would have one during the test. Deep breathing--sounds cheesy, like Jack Handy advice, but it really works wonders. Oh, and I don't think the idea of a talking to a therapist is far-fetched either, you could only benefit from it.

Good luck.

Hey brooklyn, how quickly did the proctor move on to the next section?  Do they atleast give us 30seconds or so to reset our timer?  That's my biggest concern.
As well, how long is the whole LSAT in total? 5 hours?  Was the test condition any different from how powerscore/Testmaster proctor?  Thanks.

jcc4661

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Re: *during* the LSAT: how NOT to freak out
« Reply #16 on: September 15, 2005, 02:59:41 PM »
when i took the june test, i had a small panic attack during the first section and walked out of the exam during the break. before june, i took a prep course and was uber-prepared. i was scoring increasingly well on my practice exams, i felt like i had a good handle on the material, and i even felt confident walking into the test. but i think the pressure i put on myself to reach my full potential made me crack as soon as i opened the test booklet. the words on the page suddenly didn't make sense to me. i panicked, and it was pretty much downhill after that.

so i'm signed up for october, and now that it is a few weeks away, i'm feeling some of those old butterflies in the stomach. i'm definitely keeping my review light and trying not to put pressure on myself, and i've ditched my mantra of "175 or bust" from the last test. but my question is: how do i freakin' relax during the actual test and completely forget that this one moment will determine my future for the next 3 years and thereafter?

how do you all handle the pressure? think happy thoughts? deep breaths? i've even considered seeing a therapist for a session in hopes that i can learn to relax and feel better. is that a good idea? i feel silly even posting this, because i'm generally a laid-back, chill person, but the lsat - actually, the whole law school app process - seems to bring out the neurotic freak in me. that seems to be true for a lot of people.

thanks for your help!   

The same thing happened to me in June, and I am registered for October now; it all started because of this girl next to me who was making a lot of noise with her highlighter, along w/ the fact that I was striving for perfection, too.

Since, I've gotten a prescription to xanax, which a buddy of mine used successfully during the test.  If not on Test Day, I plan on taking it the night before in order to sleep, and I'm sure there will be a residual effect -- I hope, anyway.

Other than that, I am trying not to care so much (I know: easier said than done). . . but, really, there are plenty of other occupations, and you can't just say that, you have to believe that -- there is a difference!  Anytime you think a negative thought, just replace it with a positive one; so, don't even allow yourself to think negatively at ALL.

Remind yourself, too, that things could be worse: you could be homeless, live in Ethiopia, or have a terminal illness.  From the point of view, the LSAT can almost seem like a privilege.  Constantly remind yourself of what you do have.  I hope that helps to some extent.

The Dread Pirate Roberts

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Re: *during* the LSAT: how NOT to freak out
« Reply #17 on: September 15, 2005, 03:17:07 PM »
I agree on the deep (slow) breathing thing.  And when all else fails, when I got anxious or freaked about time running out, or whatever, I just tried to concentrate on getting through the questions one at a time, as if the one I was on was the only one that mattered.

Also, you might decide on something pleasant and calming to do after the exam, and when you're stressed between or before sections, think about that.  A sport, a video game, a hot mug of mulled cider, a favorite novel, a comfort movie, whatever.  I personally find that when I'm stressed out, it helps to think "whatever else happens, in (insert number) hours this is going to be over, and I'm going to be drinking a glass of lemonade and reading a novel."

bubble-filler

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Re: *during* the LSAT: how NOT to freak out
« Reply #18 on: September 15, 2005, 03:53:10 PM »
thanks everyone for all of your anti-anxiety techniques. knowing that other people are in the same boat and have to find their own ways of coping with the test is comforting in itself. i'll be rooting for all of you in october!     

B.K.

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Re: *during* the LSAT: how NOT to freak out
« Reply #19 on: September 15, 2005, 11:58:25 PM »
Whoever suggested yoga is on to something. Although I didn't take it up intentionally as a way of calming during during the LSAT, I did happen to start practicing Bikram (hot) yoga a month or so before the test.  I think the meditation benefits that you get during the class certainly seep into the rest of the parts of your life. Plus, it's an amazing workout.

I've suffered from anxiety attacks ( at random times in my life, not constantly) since high school and I was really worried that I would have one during the test. Deep breathing--sounds cheesy, like Jack Handy advice, but it really works wonders. Oh, and I don't think the idea of a talking to a therapist is far-fetched either, you could only benefit from it.

Good luck.

Hey brooklyn, how quickly did the proctor move on to the next section?  Do they atleast give us 30seconds or so to reset our timer?  That's my biggest concern.
As well, how long is the whole LSAT in total? 5 hours?  Was the test condition any different from how powerscore/Testmaster proctor?  Thanks.

I would say we had 5 seconds, max, between sections. And although the test itself was almost five hours, with the 10 min. break, I was at the site from 12-7...incompent proctors did not know how to get started/checked in/seated, etc. We didn't start till after 2pm! I'm not trying to scare you, just be prepared that your caffeine might run out and plan ahead.