Law School Discussion

Early Decision Process

abc

Early Decision Process
« on: September 08, 2005, 12:03:33 PM »

"In return for the Law School's commitment to give an Early Decision applicant a decision by mid-December, the applicant must commit, at the time of application, to attend the Law School if admitted under the Early Decision program, and to withdraw and/or not initiate applications at other law schools."

If one applies under this program, and is accepted but does't want to attend - what are the consequences?  Is this provision enforceable?

tacojohn

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Re: Early Decision Process
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2005, 09:52:28 AM »
Yes.  Early Decision is legally binding.  You can only apply to one school ED, and if they accept you, you must go.  If you don't go, I doubt you can attend anywhere else.  Worst case scenario is you'll be on the hook for tuition.

bruin

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Re: Early Decision Process
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2005, 10:55:48 PM »

"In return for the Law School's commitment to give an Early Decision applicant a decision by mid-December, the applicant must commit, at the time of application, to attend the Law School if admitted under the Early Decision program, and to withdraw and/or not initiate applications at other law schools."

If one applies under this program, and is accepted but does't want to attend - what are the consequences?  Is this provision enforceable?


You don't go to any law school that year. Law schools routienly send lists of the studnets that they admit under the ED process to other law schools. I doubt that these other schools would look kindly on your attempt to break your agreement with the ED school.