Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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Poll

Why are the Newbies scared to speak up?

They prefer to Lurk.
 16 (34.8%)
They're not, they're just on another website.
 4 (8.7%)
The Board is too cliquish.
 10 (21.7%)
There's nothing interesting to talk about.
 2 (4.3%)
There's nobody interesting to talk to.
 2 (4.3%)
Not enough Board moderation.
 4 (8.7%)
Newbies?  What Newbies?
 8 (17.4%)

Total Members Voted: 46

Author Topic: Black Law Student Discussion Board  (Read 1639891 times)

seu2002

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #15690 on: June 03, 2005, 12:25:40 PM »
FINE!!!  I'll be nice!!  Just bc all of you said I should!!   :(


Haha.  JK.  She's my girl.  We go way back.  She dragged me to watch Monster-In-Law 2 weeks ago.  Cute movie.  I enjoyed it. 



But yeah, thanks for the tips on the longest yard.  i'm looking forward to it.   :D :D

glascow1

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #15691 on: June 03, 2005, 12:40:43 PM »
MC-

it certainly did - so much so that I still think my prep school experience was my college exprience and my college experience was my should've been high school experience......in prep school I was so out of whack I graduated with a lousy gpa - my first 2 years in college I got easy b/b+ average without even trying - once I started trying I was getting A's.  I wish LS would be that easy but I dont think it will be.
Fordham Law 2008

lex19

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #15692 on: June 03, 2005, 12:46:37 PM »
MC-

it certainly did - so much so that I still think my prep school experience was my college exprience and my college experience was my should've been high school experience......in prep school I was so out of whack I graduated with a lousy gpa - my first 2 years in college I got easy b/b+ average without even trying - once I started trying I was getting A's. I wish LS would be that easy but I dont think it will be.

i cosign on this, i thought that my high school gpa was off the chain, but when i recieved my transcript to see my SAT scores i was dead wrong.....then i remembered how hard the academics were at my prep school and what a breeze college was, if i wasn't an arse and didn't get an F in a class for absences i would have graduated with high honors, i was such an arse

for academics alone i definitly recommend prep schools for tha kids, also when i got to college it was i like "been there done that" especially since i was a border

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #15693 on: June 03, 2005, 12:46:59 PM »
MC-

it certainly did - so much so that I still think my prep school experience was my college exprience and my college experience was my should've been high school experience......in prep school I was so out of whack I graduated with a lousy gpa - my first 2 years in college I got easy b/b+ average without even trying - once I started trying I was getting A's.  I wish LS would be that easy but I dont think it will be.


you couldn't be more correct...lol
"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
Charles H. Houston

blk_reign

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #15694 on: June 03, 2005, 01:46:52 PM »
Intracultural Conflicts
By Dan Woog, Monster Contributing Writer

In the world of 21st-century demographic descriptors, "African American" seems straightforward: If your skin is black, you trace your ancestry back to Africa, and if you're in America, you are American.

But society has never viewed race in such simple terms. Today, recognition is growing for the historical and cultural differences among US-born African Americans, those who emigrated from the Caribbean and recent arrivals from Africa. As foreign-born blacks grow increasingly common in the workplace, intracultural conflicts may also increase.

The percentage of those with black skin who are foreign-born in the US rose from 4.9 percent to 6.7 percent between 1990 and 2000, according to Census Bureau data analyzed by Susan Weber of Queens College, as reported in the New York Times on August 29, 2004.

An Undercurrent of Tension
Dr. Craig Polite, a clinical and industrial psychologist, calls it "tension with a small 't.' It's more like an undertone of conflict, particularly between those born in the Caribbean and those born in the US. It doesn't surface a lot, but people from the islands have the impression they're a little bit smarter, a little more superior. It doesn't get talked about, but it's there."

Cynthia Swift, who teaches multicultural issues in the Graduate School of Education and Allied Professions at Fairfield University in Fairfield, Connecticut, and is coordinator of the Academic Advantage program, agrees. "The legacy of colonialism impacts each group, along with how people are introduced to and have access to work," she says. "People born in Africa have a different perspective on opportunities and rights at work than those who were born here, who have their own perspective on this country's history of discrimination."

All three groups share "misinformation and a lack of understanding of each other," she adds.

The Historical Legacy
When African Americans living in the South moved north in the '30s and '40s to fill low-paying jobs, they fought for their rights, demanded access to better jobs and were often unwilling to continue ill-paying work under poor conditions.

When recent immigrants reached the US, some with good educations and willing to start at the bottom and work several jobs to achieve success, some employers viewed them as "better workers, with better attitudes" than African Americans, says Swift. It worsened in hard economic times when more people vied for fewer jobs. And the situation is exacerbated in communities where young American-born blacks think, "it's better to be cool than smart," she explains. Comedian Bill Cosby decried this phenomenon when speaking at a college graduation in spring of 2004.

Majority to Minority
"People from the islands grow up as part of the dominant culture," says Larri Mazon, director of Multicultural Relations at Fairfield University. "They come from a country run by people who look like them. They don't understand what it's like to be seen as not a valid contributor to society. When they get here, they may pick up on the stereotypical attitude toward blacks and think, 'I'm not born here. I'm not like them.'"

African-born immigrants also come from countries where people are physically homogenous. Because of visa requirements and immigration restrictions, they often arrive here with skills that immediately vault them into the upper echelons of business.

Mazon notes that he is talking primarily about African-born men. Their male-dominated culture can mean chauvinistic attitudes. "I've heard many complaints from black women about male African supervisors," he says.

Resentment also extends to immigration policies that allow Caribbean islanders to work what Mazon calls "16 jobs."

"Employers gravitate toward people who will do that," he explains. "(Islanders) don't know an employer may stab you in the back, whereas American-born blacks might see that willingness to work so hard as a 'yes, massa' attitude."

Common Ground
So can a black community exist in the workplace? Yes, says Polite, though it is "in the background, not up front."

"A lot of black folks get together in part for support, and perhaps as a reality check against what they think they see and feel (from non-blacks)," he adds. "We like being able to speak a common language and let our hair down. Our conversations have a slightly different slant. In the end, no matter where they're from, when black folks get together, we're all in the mix."

We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

lex19

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #15695 on: June 03, 2005, 01:58:33 PM »
great article black, i did a paper on this subject in undergrad...

alot of my friends from college were fist generation from different carribean islands and although are skin is the same color and may have even lived down the street from one another we grew up in very different cultures....

not proud to say but i was definitly raised to "look down upon" blacks from the carribean. ex. my mother and grandmother were always telling me never to date a man from the carribean...and when i got to college my friends who were from Haiti, Jamaica and so on were raised to think the same about American born blacks (not all but enough)

i could go on and on, but i actaully have a project to work on today

_BP_

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #15696 on: June 03, 2005, 02:10:19 PM »
great article black, i did a paper on this subject in undergrad...

alot of my friends from college were fist generation from different carribean islands and although are skin is the same color and may have even lived down the street from one another we grew up in very different cultures....

not proud to say but i was definitly raised to "look down upon" blacks from the carribean. ex. my mother and grandmother were always telling me never to date a man from the carribean...and when i got to college my friends who were from Haiti, Jamaica and so on were raised to think the same about American born blacks (not all but enough)

i could go on and on, but i actaully have a project to work on today

Very interesting Lex.  American born blacks that I have come across never had problems dating me though...but it could be my drop dead good looks that overcame any stigma attached to dating guys from the Caribbean ;)

Excerpt from the article:

People from the islands grow up as part of the dominant culture," says Larri Mazon, director of Multicultural Relations at Fairfield University. "They come from a country run by people who look like them. They don't understand what it's like to be seen as not a valid contributor to society. When they get here, they may pick up on the stereotypical attitude toward blacks and think, 'I'm not born here. I'm not like them.'"

Not so fast.  Yes I came from a country where blacks are the majority, but blacks are definitely NOT running the country.  CEO's of major corporations and people who control assets in the country are predominately white people.  So in some ways it is just as bad , because blacks are by far the majority in the caribbean but by far the minority in positions of power.
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
1776 TO 2006

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #15697 on: June 03, 2005, 02:16:32 PM »


Very interesting Lex.  American born blacks that I have come across never had problems dating me though...but it could be my drop dead good looks that overcame any stigma attached to dating guys from the Caribbean ;)



LOL

Pop ya colla, BP.
"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
Charles H. Houston

lex19

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #15698 on: June 03, 2005, 02:17:08 PM »
BP, the exert you pulled from the article is kinda on point, although whites are still running a large majority corporations and gov'ts in carribean countries blacks make up the majority of the pop, they may not be the dominant race but you can't edit: get through a day in Haiti without seeing a person with brown skin unless you live in some exclusive development or are at a crazy ritzy resort...see what i mean...maybe??



blk_reign

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #15699 on: June 03, 2005, 02:26:27 PM »
I thought that the article was interesting as there was a debate a while ago in the am i black? thread..

the problem is that there are many misconceptions in this country.. if more of us took the time to learn more aspects of black history then we'd have a better understanding of our brothers and sisters from the Caribbean and Africa (and other countries for that matter)

but Lex I definitely feel you..we can go days without seeing another black face in this country...and if we do see blacks at times we can count them..that's really amazing to me
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...