Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Poll

Why are the Newbies scared to speak up?

They prefer to Lurk.
 16 (34.8%)
They're not, they're just on another website.
 4 (8.7%)
The Board is too cliquish.
 10 (21.7%)
There's nothing interesting to talk about.
 2 (4.3%)
There's nobody interesting to talk to.
 2 (4.3%)
Not enough Board moderation.
 4 (8.7%)
Newbies?  What Newbies?
 8 (17.4%)

Total Members Voted: 46

Author Topic: Black Law Student Discussion Board  (Read 1692722 times)

A.

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 15712
    • View Profile
Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #54540 on: September 11, 2008, 05:43:29 AM »
:D that's great

t L

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2201
    • View Profile
Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #54541 on: September 11, 2008, 02:56:10 PM »
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGolb5tE8jw

Has anybody seen this before?  This *&^% had me crackin' up and shakin' my head at the same time.
Michigan 2L

7S

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2647
  • Self-determination.
    • View Profile
Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #54542 on: September 14, 2008, 02:04:43 AM »
This may come as a surprise to you all, but the new Tyler Perry movie was very gooood!
It is easy to change the language of oppression without changing the sociopolitical situation of its victims.

jarhead

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2747
  • "i keeps it reeaal!"
    • View Profile
Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #54543 on: September 14, 2008, 11:34:06 AM »
Black man in elevator

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HRfjLfyXYlA


LMAO 7S...what a great post to come back on...a lady on the upper east side clutched her purse and gave me the scared over the shoulder look...but once she realized i wasn't going to rob her she apologized...so i didn't bash the dumb b*^tch LOL
...man, you was who you was before you got here

7S

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2647
  • Self-determination.
    • View Profile
Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #54544 on: September 14, 2008, 06:47:54 PM »
It is easy to change the language of oppression without changing the sociopolitical situation of its victims.

Burning Sands, Esq.

  • Global Moderator
  • LSD Obsessed
  • ****
  • Posts: 7072
  • Yes We Kan-sas!!!
    • View Profile
Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #54545 on: September 15, 2008, 11:09:14 AM »
"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
Charles H. Houston

LittleRussianPrincess, Esq.

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2355
  • Hopelessly devoted...to the Tennessee Vols!
    • View Profile
Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #54546 on: September 16, 2008, 01:32:42 PM »
question:

do you guys think the below smiley is racist/offensive?

http://www.volnation.com/forum/images/smilies/default/mamba.gif

someone used it on another board i frequent and i said that i thought it looked like blackface. i was told i was insane. am i?  ???
Russian by birth, Southern by the grace of God.

Eugene Young

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 538
    • View Profile
Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #54547 on: September 16, 2008, 06:18:20 PM »
depends on the context

generally speaking, yes.

but if statistic/massa (whatever happened to him btw) was using it, probably not.

ETA: It could be considered offensive, not racist, depending on the context.

Kirk Lazarus

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2042
  • I'm a lead farmer, mofo
    • View Profile
Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #54548 on: September 16, 2008, 08:00:34 PM »
How can a smiley face be racist?
YLS c/o 2009

7S

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2647
  • Self-determination.
    • View Profile
Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #54549 on: September 17, 2008, 01:01:58 AM »
did you see that damn smiley?
It is easy to change the language of oppression without changing the sociopolitical situation of its victims.