Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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Poll

Why are the Newbies scared to speak up?

They prefer to Lurk.
 16 (34.8%)
They're not, they're just on another website.
 4 (8.7%)
The Board is too cliquish.
 10 (21.7%)
There's nothing interesting to talk about.
 2 (4.3%)
There's nobody interesting to talk to.
 2 (4.3%)
Not enough Board moderation.
 4 (8.7%)
Newbies?  What Newbies?
 8 (17.4%)

Total Members Voted: 46

Author Topic: Black Law Student Discussion Board  (Read 1639303 times)

Special Agent Dana Scully

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53960 on: May 18, 2008, 04:15:52 PM »
i was wondering if anyone could help me...I am currently an 0L make a decision between Touro or John Marshall. Are there students who attend or know about these schools? Thanks in advance?

I know nothing about the schools, but I'd say that you should pick the school that's located in the market that you want to work in.  Thus, do you want to work in Chicago?  If so, go to JM.  If you want NY, go to Touro.
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boombasticlady

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53961 on: May 18, 2008, 11:07:26 PM »
yea that thing is i dont have a preference for either Chicago or NY. They both have strong job markets in the legal field. I was looking at the fact that Touro has more competition from the 9 other law schools that are located in the city and feel like no matter how hard i try ill be pitted against them on the other hand John Marshall also has serious competition but only about 4 schools i think. Ultimately i want to study trial advocacy/ litigation Can anyone shed more light on these schools for me? Thank you in advance

Special Agent Dana Scully

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53962 on: May 18, 2008, 11:19:07 PM »
yea that thing is i dont have a preference for either Chicago or NY. They both have strong job markets in the legal field. I was looking at the fact that Touro has more competition from the 9 other law schools that are located in the city and feel like no matter how hard i try ill be pitted against them on the other hand John Marshall also has serious competition but only about 4 schools i think. Ultimately i want to study trial advocacy/ litigation Can anyone shed more light on these schools for me? Thank you in advance
You can't just think about the other local law schools.  You have to realize that NYC and Chicago are MAJOR markets, and more besides the students from the local schools are trying to work there.

I don't think that anyone on BLSD attends those schools.  What you need to do is find some alums and see if they can steer you in the right direction.  Also, look at the attrition rates/curves for each school, see where people are getting jobs and whatnot.  Honestly, almost any school will prepare you for litigation and trial stuff...it's a matter of being able to find a job afterwards.  With both of these schools, you are going to have to bust your ass in academics and networking.
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boombasticlady

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53963 on: May 18, 2008, 11:46:11 PM »
ok Thank you very much for your help Dr Meredith Grey i will definitely look into that

blk_reign

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53964 on: May 19, 2008, 03:48:15 PM »
if Chicago i'd say John Marshall.. they have a huge connection with the Chicago bar association and biglaw firms throughout the city..
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53965 on: May 22, 2008, 02:24:42 AM »
Thurgood was surprisingly good.  Highly recommended.

ETA:

On Broadway, Laurence Fishburne, Yale Profs Discuss Marshall Legacy
Posted by Dan Slater

The Law Blog hoofed it up to Broadway last night to check out the Booth Theatre’s production of “Thurgood,” a one-man show about the life of Supreme Court justice Thurgood Marshall, portrayed by Laurence Fishburne (”The Matrix,” “Searching for Bobby Fischer”). Seated next to a Heller Ehrman attorney, in a theater chock-full of lawyers, we watched Fishburne strut his stuff and deliver a compelling history lesson through the lens of Marshall’s life (1908-1993).

After the play, which was co-produced by Yale law school alum Eric Falkenstein (”The History Boys,” “The Seafarer”), three Yale law profs and former Marshall clerks — Owen Fiss, Stephen Carter and Dan Kahan — took the stage, along with Fishburne, to discuss their impressions of his performance and how the play jibed with their recollections of Justice Marshall.

In his post-show dress of Nikes, khaki pants and an orange t-shirt from Newark’s Weequahic High School (he said it was a gift), Fishburne told the audience that the goal of the show was to leave them with the feeling that they’d spent a personal, intimate night with Marshall.

Fiss, who clerked for Marshall in 1964 when he was still on the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, begged to differ with Fishburne’s assessment, but only to congratulate him further. He said the show was more than an intimate portrayal of Marshall’s life, that it also showed Marshall’s unique position in American history as one of the drivers of what Professor Fiss called “the Second Reconstruction.” Fiss said that, despite some rights being “savaged by the Rehnquist court,” we can now look back on an era that Marshall helped shepherd into existence, an era that has seen the rise of Marshall’s ideals and a new black middle class. Fiss said he thought this so-called Second Reconstruction was now at an end, though he and Fishburne agreed that there was still a lot of work to be done in the slums of cities like New Orleans, Baltimore and New York.

As a lawyer, Marshall, of course, is best known for defeating John Davis, the lawyer who represented the Topeka school board in the 1954 desegregation case of Brown v. Board of Education. As a sad coda to last night’s show, and to Professor Fiss’s pronouncement that the ideals Marshall stood for have now been mostly realized, today the NYT is reporting that Zelma Henderson, a Kansas beautician who was the sole surviving plaintiff in Brown, died on Tuesday in Topeka. She was 88 and had lived in Topeka all her adult life.

http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2008/05/22/on-broadway-fishburne-yale-profs-discuss-marshall-legacy/

Statistic

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53966 on: May 22, 2008, 01:22:59 PM »
i might see that play
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A.

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53967 on: May 22, 2008, 01:38:06 PM »
You should.  Ready to graduate?

Statistic

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53968 on: May 22, 2008, 03:30:35 PM »
yep!
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Astro

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53969 on: May 22, 2008, 11:39:46 PM »
I'm posting this here because I know there will a different connection with this material on this board than anywhere else on LSD.

I've finally begun reading Long Walk to Freedom.  I put it off for years.  Originally, I didn't read it because I thought it deserved better critical skills and knowledge than I had when I was a teenager.  Subsequently, I avoided it because I wanted to do my research in undergrad (focused, as it was, on postcolonialism and its interaction with the philosophy of history) without resorting to autobiographies. 

But now, I finally have time to sit down and read it on my own terms.  To just digest it and let it sink in.  And, not surprisingly, the book is phenomenal.

However, there's one part that truly strikes me now that I've completed a year of law school.  Pages 260-261, I believe, are an indictment not just of the South African legal system of the time, but of all legal systems across the world.  It holds particular relevance for the United States.

I'm curious how people feel about the key paragraph, which I will quote:

Quote
As a student, I had been taught that South Africa was a place where the rule of law was paramount and applied to all persons, regardless of their social status or official position.  I sincerely believed this and planned my life based on that assumption.  But my career as a lawyer and activist removed the scales from my eyes.  I saw that there was a wide difference between what I had been taught in the lecture room and what I learned in the courtroom.  I went from having an idealistic view of the law as a sword of justice to a perception of the law as a tool used by the ruling class to shape society in a way favorable to itself.  I never expected justice in court, however much I fought for it, and though I sometimes received it.

Those familiar with me will know why this book is so important to me.  But even for those to whom my posting here is completely new (I haven't really said much on here in a very long time), what do you think?

Incredible man, that Mandela.  Fascinating.
J, if you didn't bring enough penis for everyone, you shouldn't have brought any penis at all.