Law School Discussion

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Why are the Newbies scared to speak up?

They prefer to Lurk.
 16 (34.8%)
They're not, they're just on another website.
 4 (8.7%)
The Board is too cliquish.
 10 (21.7%)
There's nothing interesting to talk about.
 2 (4.3%)
There's nobody interesting to talk to.
 2 (4.3%)
Not enough Board moderation.
 4 (8.7%)
Newbies?  What Newbies?
 8 (17.4%)

Total Members Voted: 46

Author Topic: Black Law Student Discussion Board  (Read 1683612 times)

NYBound05

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #70 on: July 11, 2004, 09:24:41 PM »
Thanks for the reply!

Is USC the school you will be attending?  How do you like the campus?  I'm from the Bay Area (California), and for the most part would like to attend law school on the east coast.  However, I'm also applying to school in southern Cali, just in case. 

What I'm looking for most in a school is student diversity, so if USC is big on that, I may just consider them as one of my top schools.  And by diversity, I mean diversity of different races.  People consider the school I attend to be diverse (UC Berkeley), while the student population is only 2.5% Black.  They consider it diverse because it's like 30 something percent Asian, 40% white, and little speckles of everything else.   :-\ Diverse?  Yeah right...

NYBound05

My gpa was a 3.4 which isn't the greatest but for what I lacked in numbers I compensated with my personal statement and extracurricular activities.  Since I'm experienced in the whole admissions game, make sure the other materials of your application are on point.  USC is GREAT choice as a minority applicant.  They are one of the few law schools that have a genuine focus on diversity.  I wouldn't have even thought to apply there had I not received a fee waiver.  Nothing is a given in the application process,but if you have a solid application including numbers at least at or above mine, I think you should be ok.

ruskiegirl

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #71 on: July 11, 2004, 09:34:44 PM »
I don't mean to be offensive, but I think that "diversity" is only partially defined by the percentage of African-Americans in the student body.  Berkeley is not "un-diverse" because its student body is only 2.5% black.  As you mentioned, it is 30% Asian and I think that Asians, as well as members of other ethnic and racial groups, certainly contribute to the diversity of a particular school.  Furthermore, I personally do not limit the difinition of diversity by only considering racial and ethnic criteria.  Diversity has to do with the unique perspectives people from various backgrounds can offer to the intellectual and social environment.  Those perspectives can come from people from under-represented racial backgrounds, but members of other groups can also contribute to diversity.  Gays and lesbians, people with disabilities, foreign-born students and others all contribute to the diversity of Berkeley.  Therefore, I think it's unfair to say that it is not diverse simply because it has a low representation of African-American students. 

Once again, I appologize if this comes off as offensive, especially since it is coming from someone who is not traditionally considered a minority (Russian female).

Regal_Muse

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #72 on: July 12, 2004, 01:50:58 AM »
My recommendation is for applicants to apply to schools where they fall within the 25/75 percentile range. DO apply to a few dream schools but also be realistic in your approach. I attend USC and spoke to several admissions counselors...they emphasized LSATs. As a matter of fact, they will overlook some GPA issues if you have a stellar LSAT score. One thing I respect about USC is that is very diverse in comparison to other law schools in So. Cal. They make a conscious effort to make sure black and Latino students are admitted. HOWEVER...you must remember that you are competing with individuals with high LSATs and GPA who are also URM. URM still need to be on point with everything when applying to law schools.

NYBound05

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #73 on: July 12, 2004, 06:24:58 PM »
I never implied in my post that racial diversity is the only type of diversity that exists.  I was specifically speaking on Berkeley's LACK of racial diversity.  Yes, there is diversity in terms of sexual orientation, background, etc, but that is reflected in Berkeley as a city period.  What's NOT reflected is the racial diversity that is so pronounced OFF campus (a large number of Berkeley city residents are Black), but once you step foot onto UC Berkeley, the majority of students are asian and white.  I've lived in the area my whole life, and to see one of the most proclaimed "diverse" schools lack a significant number of Blacks on their campus is just sickening.

And so no, Berkeley is not racially diverse, which is extremely unfortunate.  A lot of the time when people think of diversity, the first thing that comes to mind is race.  To overstep that completely, especially in a city that is so racially diverse, is to impair the whole meaning of diversity itself.



I don't mean to be offensive, but I think that "diversity" is only partially defined by the percentage of African-Americans in the student body.  Berkeley is not "un-diverse" because its student body is only 2.5% black.  As you mentioned, it is 30% Asian and I think that Asians, as well as members of other ethnic and racial groups, certainly contribute to the diversity of a particular school.  Furthermore, I personally do not limit the difinition of diversity by only considering racial and ethnic criteria.  Diversity has to do with the unique perspectives people from various backgrounds can offer to the intellectual and social environment.  Those perspectives can come from people from under-represented racial backgrounds, but members of other groups can also contribute to diversity.  Gays and lesbians, people with disabilities, foreign-born students and others all contribute to the diversity of Berkeley.  Therefore, I think it's unfair to say that it is not diverse simply because it has a low representation of African-American students. 

Once again, I appologize if this comes off as offensive, especially since it is coming from someone who is not traditionally considered a minority (Russian female).

ruskiegirl

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #74 on: July 12, 2004, 06:27:58 PM »
So you are saying that Asians do not count towards racial diversity?

We can agree to disagree, but I've always defined racial diversity a bit differently.  To me, the presence of any non-white racial/ethnic group contributed to racial diversity. 

Coming from the University of Tennessee, where whites make up 93% of the student body, I see Berkeley as quite diverse in comparison to my undergrad and its peer institutions.

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #75 on: July 12, 2004, 06:34:52 PM »
What I'm looking for most in a school is student diversity, so if USC is big on that, I may just consider them as one of my top schools.  And by diversity, I mean diversity of different races.  People consider the school I attend to be diverse (UC Berkeley), while the student population is only 2.5% Black. 

And so no, Berkeley is not racially diverse, which is extremely unfortunate.  A lot of the time when people think of diversity, the first thing that comes to mind is race.  To overstep that completely, especially in a city that is so racially diverse, is to impair the whole meaning of diversity itself.

Few people understand the psychology of dealing with a highway traffic cop. Your normal speeder will panic and immediately pull over to the side. This is wrong. It arouses contempt in the cop-heart. Make the bastard chase you. He will follow.

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #76 on: July 12, 2004, 06:37:25 PM »
My recommendation is for applicants to apply to schools where they fall within the 25/75 percentile range. DO apply to a few dream schools but also be realistic in your approach. I attend USC and spoke to several admissions counselors...they emphasized LSATs. As a matter of fact, they will overlook some GPA issues if you have a stellar LSAT score. One thing I respect about USC is that is very diverse in comparison to other law schools in So. Cal. They make a conscious effort to make sure black and Latino students are admitted. HOWEVER...you must remember that you are competing with individuals with high LSATs and GPA who are also URM. URM still need to be on point with everything when applying to law schools.


Regal Muse, you are right on point.  And going back to what NYBound05 put up earlier, we know what you meant b/c on occasion that does happen where we get into schools with lower standardized scores when other factors other than standardized scores are taken into consideration.  California, however, is not one of those states.  Neither is Texas.  I'm sure you all know about proposition 209 and its affect on AA and Black enrollment in Cali schools.

Applying to law school has been a 2 year process for me, and when I was gathering all my info, one of the strongest factors that I was looking for was a decent % of Blacks in the student body, because you know you get tired of having to represent the entire race for every tom, male private part and harry that wants to say something stupid. 

(if you get some free time, look around this discussion board on any Affirmative Action thread, you'll see a lot of "true colors" from our mainstream counterparts)


But at any rate, one thing that stuck out to me when I was researching law schools was that the cali schools had like NO black folks compared to the rest of the country.  Its like Cali schools are anti-black or something.  Even schools like Harvard and Yale have higher black %'s than the cali schools, and those are the hardest schools to get into in the nation.

So bottom line, if you are talking about USC and a host of other schools then actually yes it is very beneficial for you to look at the 25/75 range because that's what you are up against.

Don't take offense NYBound, we just need to make sure we stray away from the mentality that we can score lower and get in just because we are black.  ESPECIALLY in the dreaded law school application process. Sounds like you are already knowin though so its all gravy.

P.S. - now c'mon girl you KNOW they are counting anything and everything for diversity.  They'd count white women if they could get away with it.


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ruskiegirl

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #77 on: July 12, 2004, 06:42:15 PM »
BTW, I DO agree that it is unfortunate that Berkeley has such a low African-American population. I was expecting a larger representation that I had at my undergrad, but I was very surprised to see that it is so low in California.

Regal_Muse

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #78 on: July 12, 2004, 07:08:33 PM »
ruskie girl,

Just because there is a large population of Asian students, does not make the campus "diverse" for the same reasons if there were just black and white students. Personally, I just want to get into a good school. Berkeley is one of my top choices next to Harvard and Stanford. Diversity isn't that important to me at the moment because I will find other ways to network with other African Americans lawyers through my sorority and other organizations I belong to. Most URM minorities have a better chance of getting into a private school versus the UC system. Private schools take a lot of factors into consideration while the UC just seem to to be set on crunching numbers. Although UCs claim to be making an effort to admit more Latino and black students, the numbers are not reflecting this. As I've said in several of my postings, find whatever makes you stand out. Right now I'm int he process of outlining my background to see what areas I should focus on in my personal statement.

TrojanChispas

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #79 on: July 12, 2004, 07:26:05 PM »
go trojans! NOBU$H04!
Arab Majority May Not Stay Forever Silent
http://www.nysun.com/article/36110?page_no=1