Law School Discussion

Poll

Why are the Newbies scared to speak up?

They prefer to Lurk.
20 (37%)
They're not, they're just on another website.
4 (7.4%)
The Board is too cliquish.
10 (18.5%)
There's nothing interesting to talk about.
3 (5.6%)
There's nobody interesting to talk to.
2 (3.7%)
Not enough Board moderation.
4 (7.4%)
Newbies?  What Newbies?
11 (20.4%)

Total Members Voted: 54

Black Law Student Discussion Board

A.

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53560 on: February 25, 2008, 05:16:10 PM »
Whoopi Gets Snubbed By The Academy?

Now I know some folks in the black community have ďissuesĒ with Whoopi Goldberg for whatever reason. But oh well. This needs to be said. Last nightís Oscars program conveniently left out Whoopi Goldberg during their ALL ACADEMY AWARDS HOSTS MONTAGE clip. Yes, they also conveniently forgot Steve Martin as well, but I believe this exclusion of Whoopi stung because of the history she made while hosting the Oscars. She was the first woman ever to host the Academy Awards alone, as well as the first Black person ever to host the Awards show at all. Not only has she hosted once, but four times. She also made history by being the first black person to ever win all four of the major show business awards: The Academy Award, The Tony Award, The Emmy, and The Grammy. Not to mention being only the second black woman in history (after Hattie McDaniel) to even win an Oscar. For a program as esteemed as the Academy wants us to believe their awards are, this oversight of not even acknowledging Whoopi as a host of the program is unacceptable to say the least. Not only is this Black History month, but it was the 80th anniversary of the Awards show and in many ways last night, the writers made a point to showcase the history of its organization. But conveniently left out Whoopi.

I happen to actually like Whoopi (who surprisingly is one of the best co-hosts The View has ever seen), despite whatever personal choices she has made that many people in the black community feel the unnecessary need to hold against her. However, this is 2008, and given that this country still acts like itís the early 1900ís in many ways, we should protect and embrace our history so that we can pass it down through generations. Many people (especially younger generations) have no clue about the history Whoopi has made as a black woman in entertainment, and the fact no one has really even brought up the multitude of this snub speaks volumes. And if you watch The View or have followed Whoopiís career, you know that she rarely ever (if at all) lets situations emotionally affect her, especially not on national tv. But as you can see in the video above, when Whoopiís co-hosts brought up the snub and expressed their concern and confusion on how this could even happen to a woman who has made so much history in that very organization, she was moved to tears. The simple fact that sheís the first black woman to step into the lead co-hosting role on one of the top rated daytime television shows (The View) right now is history in the making. Like it or not. I can only hope people can respect her accomplishments and give credit where its due. So I felt compelled to bring this whole situation to the attention of others and you do what you will with it. Just my $19.13.

http://theybf.com/2008/02/25/whoopi-gets-snubbed-by-the-academy/

7S

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53561 on: February 26, 2008, 05:45:23 PM »
Ain't this a female dog. I just bought my mac and the newer versions just come out for the SAME DAMN PRICE!

A.

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53562 on: February 26, 2008, 05:48:33 PM »
lmao.  Welcome to Apple.

Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53563 on: February 26, 2008, 06:01:16 PM »
Ain't this a female dog. I just bought my mac and the newer versions just come out for the SAME DAMN PRICE!

that's why you shoulda been up on http://www.macrumors.com/

7S

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53564 on: February 26, 2008, 06:21:54 PM »
i had been holding out for months researching...  >:(


turn on the debates.

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53565 on: February 27, 2008, 01:45:59 PM »
Question: Kelly Tilghman said, on-air, that golfers should "lynch Tiger Woods in a back alley" if they wanted a chance at the spotlight. Tilghman apologized & Woods accepted.  Rev. Al Sharpton called for termination.  On a scale of 1 to 10, Al is a 10: b/c these type of comments demand 0 tolerance  3 (6.5%)
7-9: b/c the comments were bad and action is proper here  9 (19.6%)
4-6:  b/c although the comments were not so bad, somebody should have still spoken up  6 (13%)
1-3:  b/c its not that serious  4 (8.7%)
negative 5:  b/c Woods already accpeted the appology, making the argument moot  10 (21.7%)
negative 10: b/c Al Sharpton is intentionally showboating for his own spotlight  14 (30.4%)
 
Total Voters: 46
 

Time for a new one. 

A.

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53566 on: February 27, 2008, 03:52:43 PM »
Go Back to Black
By K. A. DILDAY

London

IíM black again. I was black in Mississippi in the 1970s but sometime in the 1980s I became African-American, with a brief pause at Afro-American. Someone, I think it was Jesse Jackson, in the days when he had that kind of clout, managed to convince America that I preferred being African-American. I donít.

Now I live in Britain where Iím black again. Blacks in Britain come from all over, although many are from the former colonies. According to the last census, about half of the British people who identify as black say they are black Caribbean, about 40 percent consider themselves black African, and the rest just feel plain old black. Black Brits are further divided by ancestral country of origin, yet they are united under the term black British ó often expanded to include British Asians from the Indian subcontinent.

The term African-American was contrived to give black Americans a sense of having a historical link to Africa, since one of slaveryís many unhappy legacies is that most black Americans donít know particulars about their origins. Black Americans whose ancestors arrived after slavery and who can pinpoint their country of origin are excluded from the definition ó which is why, early in his campaign, people said Barack Obama wasnít really African-American. Yet, since he has one parent from the African continent and one from the American continent, he is explicitly African-American.

Distinguishing between American black people based on their ancestorsí arrival date ignores the continuum of experience that transcends borders and individual genealogies and unites black people all over the world. Yes, scientists have shown that black means nothing as a biological description, but it remains an important signal in social interaction. Everywhere I travel, from North Africa to Europe to Asia, dark-skinned people approach me and, usually gently but sometimes aggressively, establish a bond.

When, early on in the race for the Democratic nomination, people wondered if black Americans would vote for Mr. Obama, I never doubted. During the last two years Iíve learned to decipher his name in almost any pronunciation, because on finding out that Iím an American, all other black people I meet, whether they are Arabic-speaking Moroccans in Casablanca, French-speaking African mobile-phone-store clerks in the outer boroughs of Paris, or thickly accented Jamaican black Brits, ask me eagerly about him. Black people all over the world feel a sense of pride in his accomplishment.

Itís hard to understand why black Americans ever tried to use the term African-American to exclude people. The black American communityís social and political power derives from its inclusiveness. Everyone who identifies as black has traditionally been welcomed, no matter their skin color or date of arrival. In Britain, in contrast, dark-skinned people who trace their relatives to particular former colonies can be cliquish. Beyond the fact that blacks make up a smaller share of the population here, this regional identity may be a reason that the British black community isnít as powerful a social and political force.

Iíve never minded not knowing who my ancestors are beyond a few generations. My partner is an Englishman whose family tree is the sort that professional genealogists post on the Internet because it can be traced back to the first king of England in the 11th century. To me, itís more comforting to know that, through me, our children will be black, with all of the privileges and pains.

On Mr. Obamaís behalf, American blacks have set aside their exclusive label. Polls show that about 80 percent of blacks who have voted in the Democratic primaries have chosen him. And all of the black people in the mountains of Morocco, the poor suburbs of Paris, the little villages in Kenya and the streets of London are cheering Mr. Obamaís victories because they see him as one of their own.

Black Americans should honor that. Itís time to retire the term African-American and go back to black.

K. A. Dilday is a columnist for the online magazine Open Democracy.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/27/opinion/27dilday.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53567 on: February 27, 2008, 06:30:15 PM »
Go Back to Black
By K. A. DILDAY

So much word to this.  I hate how people blindly call every black person African American.  How the hell do you know they are African American?  Let me tell you, African's and West Indian's generally don't like to be called AA.  Just referring to people as black is enough--and it won't make people get mad for misnaming them.

A.

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53568 on: February 27, 2008, 08:00:01 PM »
Yeah, we might as well all be black at first.  Like the Asians.  Then, once you get to know people, you can call them what they really are.  African, Island, Negro, etc. actually, I think that's it.

Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #53569 on: February 27, 2008, 08:30:07 PM »
Yeah, we might as well all be black at first.  Like the Asians.  Then, once you get to know people, you can call them what they really are.  African, Island, Negro, etc. actually, I think that's it.

agreed on the bolded...but what about those blacks in Europe?  where do they fall in your lineup?  just negro?