Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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Poll

Why are the Newbies scared to speak up?

They prefer to Lurk.
 16 (34.8%)
They're not, they're just on another website.
 4 (8.7%)
The Board is too cliquish.
 10 (21.7%)
There's nothing interesting to talk about.
 2 (4.3%)
There's nobody interesting to talk to.
 2 (4.3%)
Not enough Board moderation.
 4 (8.7%)
Newbies?  What Newbies?
 8 (17.4%)

Total Members Voted: 46

Author Topic: Black Law Student Discussion Board  (Read 1698925 times)

jgruber

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #110 on: July 15, 2004, 09:35:56 PM »
Here's another question from the curious dumb white guy.  I know that lots of blacks refer to other blacks as brother.  Is this out of a sense of solidarity or just a way to talk or ?

Ladyday

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #111 on: July 15, 2004, 10:12:50 PM »
Uncalled for.  :(

Ok here's some rules for this board (and yes I gots it like that)

1. No talk of AA NONE.
2. No name calling.

And more will be made if needed as we progress.

Ruskie, I'm not sure if it will happen in our lifetime, but yes, that's something to look forward too, but I'd be damn if I vote for some bastard like Clarence Thomas just to see a black face in the "white" office. *&^%, as much as I despise Bush, I think I'd vote for him over Thomas.

JJ, it is a term of solidarity, love and respect.


Ginatio

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #112 on: July 15, 2004, 10:13:05 PM »
What do you mean by representative government? Wouldn't that imply that the President should always be the majority? (Which is caucasian at the moment.)

Besides, hispanics are a larger minority now in this country than blacks.


Actually, a-hole, I would like to see a black president because I believe in something called representative government.  No matter how much white politicians try, they will never do for black people what a black president would.  My boyfriend is black, and I happen to be well aware of the political and social issues pertinent to Blacks in America. 

HBCU.EDU

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #113 on: July 15, 2004, 10:16:37 PM »
Burning Sands-

Nupe, that motherfucka got me heated. I'm glad I'm applying to HBCUs. I don't know if I could take that *&^% in the classroom. 

ruskiegirl

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #114 on: July 15, 2004, 10:41:43 PM »
What do you mean by representative government? Wouldn't that imply that the President should always be the majority? (Which is caucasian at the moment.)

Besides, hispanics are a larger minority now in this country than blacks.


Actually, a-hole, I would like to see a black president because I believe in something called representative government.  No matter how much white politicians try, they will never do for black people what a black president would.  My boyfriend is black, and I happen to be well aware of the political and social issues pertinent to Blacks in America. 
I meant it in the sense that all views, not just those of the majority, ought to given equal consideration and representation.  Currently, that is simply not the case.  White politicians consistently neglect issues pertinent to all minority populations and few can argue that minorities have been very successful with having their issues addressed adequately by the Legislative and Executive branches.  Most advances in minority rights and concerns have been made through the judicial system.  I think it is unfortunate that our minority population doesn't seem to have sucess with two of the most powerful branches of government.

Ginatio

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #115 on: July 15, 2004, 10:51:43 PM »
well, for that to happen, more black intellectuals need to run for political positions instead of settling for academia... Barack Obama from U Chicago to possibly the Senate, for example... Edley would have a shot at the Senate too, but he settled for advising in the Clinton admin., then teaching at Harvard, and now the Dean's position at Boalt... or Condoleeza Rice (Stanford, now a Bush advisor)...

Anyone remember that Eddie Murphy movie "The Distinguished Gentleman" ?

I meant it in the sense that all views, not just those of the majority, ought to given equal consideration and representation.  Currently, that is simply not the case.  White politicians consistently neglect issues pertinent to all minority populations and few can argue that minorities have been very successful with having their issues addressed adequately by the Legislative and Executive branches.  Most advances in minority rights and concerns have been made through the judicial system.  I think it is unfortunate that our minority population doesn't seem to have sucess with two of the most powerful branches of government.


ruskiegirl

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #116 on: July 15, 2004, 10:59:11 PM »
I agree, but I think it's we're dealing with a catch 22 here. Many Black intellectuals do not go into politics because the current political situation has caused them to believe their efforts would be fruitless.  Others stick to academia because they feel it is important to work "from the bottom up" and educational quality/opportunity among minorities need serious attention.  Their reluctance to set foot in the political arena retards political progress for minorities. 

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #117 on: July 15, 2004, 11:36:02 PM »
Burning Sands-

Nupe, that motherfucka got me heated. I'm glad I'm applying to HBCUs. I don't know if I could take that *&^% in the classroom. 

Sure you can, Nupe.  Just do what I plan to do the first time a cat wants to talk reckless in class.  Tell 'em you'll meet them after class and that'll be that.  You never know when and where the kane will come in handy. ;D
"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
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Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #118 on: July 15, 2004, 11:44:57 PM »
Actually, with over 2000 views in the General Section I was beginning to wonder how long it was going to take before one of our peers of the other persuasion came in and made a racial attack or comment.  And now my question has been answered.  I guess the temptation was just too much. 

And to think people actually question the existence of racism in this country...
"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
Charles H. Houston

Ginatio

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Re: Black Law Student Discussion Board
« Reply #119 on: July 16, 2004, 12:56:40 AM »
i think the sentiment is probably more misanthropic than racist... or rather a racist manifestation of misanthropy

Actually, with over 2000 views in the General Section I was beginning to wonder how long it was going to take before one of our peers of the other persuasion came in and made a racial attack or comment.  And now my question has been answered.  I guess the temptation was just too much. 

And to think people actually question the existence of racism in this country...