Law School Discussion

Law schools nationwide accept students displaced by Hurricane Katrina

Muse

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Law schools across the country have assembled a list of different schools Tulane and Loyola New Orleans law students may attend this fall in the wake of the disaster.For more information regarding law schools across the country that students can attend, please check out this link http://www.aals.org/neworleans/schoolsbystate.html organized by the Association of American Law Schools.


http://www.aals.org/neworleans/schoolsbystate.html

Lawprofessor

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Re: Law schools nationwide accept students displaced by Hurricane Katrina
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2005, 11:26:36 AM »
I heard that those students have to pay tuition to those schools that are accepting them instead of letting the affected schools receive the tuition from its own students. 

HippieLawChick

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Re: Law schools nationwide accept students displaced by Hurricane Katrina
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2005, 11:28:38 AM »
did you read the link LP?  Obviously not.  Most schools are letting the students come tuition-free.  (Even Berekely and Harvard!)

Where did you "hear" they weren't?

Re: Law schools nationwide accept students displaced by Hurricane Katrina
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2005, 02:36:26 PM »
How come no one wants to take 1L's?

HippieLawChick

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Re: Law schools nationwide accept students displaced by Hurricane Katrina
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2005, 12:29:44 AM »
Each school has a very individualized 1L ciricullum.  I am assuming that they think it's better just to have them defer a year.

faith2005

Re: Law schools nationwide accept students displaced by Hurricane Katrina
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2005, 03:38:27 PM »
well, my school is having people pay tuition b/c tuition goes to the state, but they are offering scholarships so that people shouldn't have to pay much...



I heard that those students have to pay tuition to those schools that are accepting them instead of letting the affected schools receive the tuition from its own students. 

PresClay_00

Re: Law schools nationwide accept students displaced by Hurricane Katrina
« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2005, 03:44:18 PM »
we had two 1Ls start in my section today from Tulane and there are few in the other.  mostly upperclassmen though b/c electives transfer a bit more easily than do core classes.

Lawprofessor

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Re: Law schools nationwide accept students displaced by Hurricane Katrina
« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2005, 01:12:18 AM »
did you read the link LP?  Obviously not.  Most schools are letting the students come tuition-free.  (Even Berekely and Harvard!)

Where did you "hear" they weren't?

-Tuition will be waived for the fall 2005 semester if the student has paid tuition to Tulane or Loyola.
-If student pays fall tuition and fees to home institution, our tuition and fees will be waived; if student does not pay tuition and fees for the fall semester to the home institution, tuition and fees are waived for Arkansas residents, and non-residents will be charged resident tuition and fees
-Pacific McGeorge will waive all tuition and fees for the fall 2005 semesterif the student has paid tuition to Tulane or Loyola-New Orleans.
-These students will be permitted to enroll at Santa Clara without payment of additional law school tuition and fees.  Currently, resident tuition for the fall 2005 semester is $6,120 for nine or more credit hours; nonresident tuition is $13,572. Fees may be charged as well.
-There will be no tuition or fees charged to students who have paid Tulane or Loyola for the Fall Semester.

As well, Faith2005's school is having students pay some tuition.  But this is just a sampling of the schools that are having students pay tuition from the link.  I did read the link, but I also have spoken to professors and deans at some schools that say they are charging students.  As you can see from above, there are schools that are charging tuition and only waiving it if you have ALREADY paid it at their institution.  They dont even say that they will be giving that tuition to the regular school so they can help recover.  So, because Berkeley and Harvard are allowing some students to come tuition free, means what exactly?  There clearly are a bunch of schools that are taking tuition from those affected students and keeping the money or at least are not outwardly saying they plan on giving that money back to the affected schools.  Perhaps you ought to read the link and a little more critically this time. 

Muse

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Re: Law schools nationwide accept students displaced by Hurricane Katrina
« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2005, 02:01:06 PM »
I'm thinking that if these students LOST everything, how would they be able to afford tuition? Don't get me wrong, I think it's generous for law schools to open their doors to those affected by the hurricane, but how will most of these student be able to afford law school if tuition isn't waived?

Lawprofessor

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Re: Law schools nationwide accept students displaced by Hurricane Katrina
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2005, 11:46:23 PM »
I'm thinking that if these students LOST everything, how would they be able to afford tuition? Don't get me wrong, I think it's generous for law schools to open their doors to those affected by the hurricane, but how will most of these student be able to afford law school if tuition isn't waived?

One way for the students to afford tuition is through loans, the same way a lot of them would have afforded tuition before losing everything.  Perhaps some will be able to get something from family members who will be able to assist them.  As there are some who have already paid for tuition and those will not have to pay tuition at the insitution they will be attending for the most part.  Though, I do agree that it will be tough for many to afford tuition if they have not already paid tuition prior to the disaster.  Here is something else.  How are the schools going to be able to pay salaries of professors when for the most part, professors salaries are paid for by student tuition.  Is this going to cause a hardship for the schools?  Is this going to cause a hardship for the professors?