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Ginatio

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Re: Engineer-Lawyers thread
« Reply #20 on: June 21, 2004, 04:32:54 PM »
One of my favorite engineering professor quotes:

"No one in the world can solve every differential equation. It's like medicine. You have a headache, ehhh... you take excedrin. You have leukemia... oh well."

My favorite quote from engineering, courtesy of my Circuits 1 instructor:
"Now, how many of you in here are from Liberal Arts? (looks, and sees no hands up)  Hmm...how many of you engineers have taken a liberal arts class? (all hands go up)  And Liberal Arts majors claim to be the 'well-rounded' ones?!?"

Ginatio

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Re: Engineer-Lawyers thread
« Reply #21 on: June 21, 2004, 04:35:54 PM »
In fact, here's a website dedicated to the man himself:

http://www.geocities.com/itsgohtime/main.html

One of my favorite engineering professor quotes:

"No one in the world can solve every differential equation. It's like medicine. You have a headache, ehhh... you take excedrin. You have leukemia... oh well."

My favorite quote from engineering, courtesy of my Circuits 1 instructor:
"Now, how many of you in here are from Liberal Arts? (looks, and sees no hands up)  Hmm...how many of you engineers have taken a liberal arts class? (all hands go up)  And Liberal Arts majors claim to be the 'well-rounded' ones?!?"

jas9999

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Re: Engineer-Lawyers thread
« Reply #22 on: June 21, 2004, 04:49:55 PM »
"Now, how many of you in here are from Liberal Arts? (looks, and sees no hands up)  Hmm...how many of you engineers have taken a liberal arts class? (all hands go up)  And Liberal Arts majors claim to be the 'well-rounded' ones?!?"

that's cute, but engineers are, by and large, some of the least well rounded people i've ever encountered. and i say this as one who works in an any league university (with an engineering school) and who interacts with engineers on a daily basis in several contexts.

computer engineers are the worst. they have NO clue about anything in the world, nor about how to deal with people. and they can't write (nor communicate verbally) for *&^%. ever try to get decent documentation out of a comp-e person? not an easy feat. the fact that i'll never have another comp-e sob for a boss after next month makes me so happy.

ee and mech e people are a little better. they have no knowledge outside of their areas of expertise, but at least have the reasoning skills to understand abstract concepts and apply them to other situations.

bme and chem-e people tend to rock. still a little sheltered, but at least they have personalities to go along with their expertise.

i thought for a while i was going to do ee. then i realized how boring it is. not difficult, just mind. numbingly. boring. it's like the worst facets of accounting and computer programming rolled into one discipline.

jas9999

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Re: Engineer-Lawyers thread
« Reply #23 on: June 21, 2004, 04:52:26 PM »
and before i get flamed, there are of course exceptions. one of my good friends has two degrees in comp-e from mit, and works for google. he knows everything about everything. all around one of the smartest people (and talented musicians) i've ever met. but i'd also spent a weekend with fifty musicians from mit, and they were the strangest group of people you could ever imagine. like the rejects from the rennaisance fair crossbred with autistic midgets.

Ginatio

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Re: Engineer-Lawyers thread
« Reply #24 on: June 21, 2004, 05:04:12 PM »
That's true to an extent. A lot of engineering kids get soooo wrapped up in their studies that they have no clue what's going on around them. But as far as being well-rounded... I don't know... I've met design majors that don't even know how to calculate the waiter's tip at a restaurant, let alone understand how the technology that surrounds them works.

that's cute, but engineers are, by and large, some of the least well rounded people i've ever encountered. and i say this as one who works in an any league university (with an engineering school) and who interacts with engineers on a daily basis in several contexts.

hahaha. ain't that the truth. code monkeys is what I call them. they spend all their time in front of their computers... clickity clak, clickity clak.

computer engineers are the worst. they have NO clue about anything in the world, nor about how to deal with people. and they can't write (nor communicate verbally) for *&^%. ever try to get decent documentation out of a comp-e person? not an easy feat. the fact that i'll never have another comp-e sob for a boss after next month makes me so happy.

as long as you're not overly generalizing, I'll agree... Although I'm EE and I found that I did better in LAS courses than people actually majoring in the subject matter of those courses (e.g., sociology, literature, communications, etc.). Not touting my horn, but just saying there's those of us out there that aren't typical.  :)

ee and mech e people are a little better. they have no knowledge outside of their areas of expertise, but at least have the reasoning skills to understand abstract concepts and apply them to other situations.

i've noticed this too, but I think it's because ChemE and BioMeds are more proportionally American. The CEs, MEs, and EEs are mostly foreign students, so there tends to be somewhat of a culture clash that probably leads to most of the stereotypes surrounding engineers.

bme and chem-e people tend to rock. still a little sheltered, but at least they have personalities to go along with their expertise.


wow. you have no idea how hard it is. it's not boring at all once you understand what's going on. i mean, you are literally learning how the world works, how atoms interact, how everything around you is designed. Laying the foundation (calculus, physics, chemistry, materials science, etc.) may be boring, but when you've been studying that *&^% for 3+ years, everything starts coming together... I took courses in quantum structures and engineering, high frequency engineering, antennas, etc. and I gotta tell you, it's far from boring, and far from "easy" as well...

i thought for a while i was going to do ee. then i realized how boring it is. not difficult, just mind. numbingly. boring. it's like the worst facets of accounting and computer programming rolled into one discipline.

Ginatio

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Re: Engineer-Lawyers thread
« Reply #25 on: June 21, 2004, 05:06:39 PM »
lol. yes. sorry for flaming (above).  ;D


and before i get flamed, there are of course exceptions. one of my good friends has two degrees in comp-e from mit, and works for google. he knows everything about everything. all around one of the smartest people (and talented musicians) i've ever met. but i'd also spent a weekend with fifty musicians from mit, and they were the strangest group of people you could ever imagine. like the rejects from the rennaisance fair crossbred with autistic midgets.

jas9999

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Re: Engineer-Lawyers thread
« Reply #26 on: June 21, 2004, 05:07:28 PM »
what's a design major? like, fashion? or architecture...

Ginatio

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Re: Engineer-Lawyers thread
« Reply #27 on: June 21, 2004, 05:10:24 PM »
fashion design, interior design, hmm... the rest are listed here:
http://www.drexel.edu/academics/comad/acadprograms/index.htm

I don't lump architecture majors in with design, though... those guys have to use the whole of their brains... creativity, practical design, technical design, etc.

what's a design major? like, fashion? or architecture...

farnsworth

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Re: Engineer-Lawyers thread
« Reply #28 on: June 21, 2004, 05:12:40 PM »
Computer engineers are the worst. they have NO clue about anything in the world, nor about how to deal with people. and they can't write (nor communicate verbally) for *&^%. ever try to get decent documentation out of a comp-e person? not an easy feat. the fact that i'll never have another comp-e sob for a boss after next month makes me so happy.

Ouch.  I suppose that is true with a fair number of CmpE's, although the ones I hung out with at school tended to have verbal and interpersonal skills that met or exceeded many of the liberal arts students I knew.  Most of that is probably self-selection though...I didn't really hang out with the guys who lived in the labs 24/7.

In my experience, CS was FAR worse than CmpE's as far as social skills etc.  Some of those guys were waaaay off the deep end.  I guess if you're doing nothing but code that'll happen to you.  We did a lot of hardware stuff (my personal favorite), along with some of the EE analog stuff.  I couldn't imagine having 4 programming classes/semester.

schoomp

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Re: Engineer-Lawyers thread
« Reply #29 on: June 21, 2004, 05:17:07 PM »
It seems to depend on several things with computer engineers.  For example, almost all the females I've known that are into computers are very social and can deal with people and computers.  The males seem to fall into two categories:  if they have a girlfriend/wife, they are fairly social - if they have 10 online names for final fantasy (or fill in some other RPG) then they aren't that social.