Law School Discussion

Should the ABA allow purely online law schools to be ABA approved?

Hermeneutic

  • ****
  • 544
  • placenta est mendacium !
    • View Profile
I used to think not, but really, whats the difference? Just require a full year of internship for supervision before practicing IMHO. Heck, that would likely make them BETTER lawyers than many others.

I suspect the attrition rate might be hell if they let in the same 130 LSAT scores as CA, but if they required a 170 LSAT or transferring into online after a year at ABA with a 3.75 or higher GPA........make it an HONOR SOCIETY thing (vs the other extreme that it is now in CA) And the attrition would be almost 0% with an almost 100% bar pass rate.

Thoughts?

Re: Should the ABA allow purely online law schools to be ABA approved?
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2016, 12:56:46 PM »
Mixed feelings.

On the one hand, I think why not. The world is changing, technology is improving, why not allow it?

On the other hand, I've taken a couple of online classes (from a totally reputable source), and to me the quality of experience suffered. It's difficult to replicate the experience of being in a classroom, and especially the experience of law school classes. Having to stand up in front of a room full people, making arguments on the fly, learning to control your nerves...these are all important lessons that can't really be experienced online.

Does that mean that online is automatically bad? No, but I think we have to accept that it's different and (at least in some ways) lacking.

Your Honor Society idea is interesting, although I'm not sure if the market exists. The target audience for online, I think, are the 130 LSAT crowd you mentioned and working adults. Anyone with a 170 is likely to want a traditional, prestigious law degree.   

Hermeneutic

  • ****
  • 544
  • placenta est mendacium !
    • View Profile
Re: Should the ABA allow purely online law schools to be ABA approved?
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2016, 07:28:00 PM »
Mixed feelings.

On the one hand, I think why not. The world is changing, technology is improving, why not allow it?

On the other hand, I've taken a couple of online classes (from a totally reputable source), and to me the quality of experience suffered. It's difficult to replicate the experience of being in a classroom, and especially the experience of law school classes. Having to stand up in front of a room full people, making arguments on the fly, learning to control your nerves...these are all important lessons that can't really be experienced online.

Does that mean that online is automatically bad? No, but I think we have to accept that it's different and (at least in some ways) lacking.

Your Honor Society idea is interesting, although I'm not sure if the market exists. The target audience for online, I think, are the 130 LSAT crowd you mentioned and working adults. Anyone with a 170 is likely to want a traditional, prestigious law degree.

I'm not saying 170 lsat folks would jump boat to a new school, but offer (in theory) it as a program where they are at. The way that many have weekends and evening programs already, but online.

To be fair 170 people go to places like Cooley to get full ride scholarships as is.

Re: Should the ABA allow purely online law schools to be ABA approved?
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2016, 11:07:00 AM »
I definitely think that more online classes should be offered for 2Ls/3Ls. Not the core stuff, but classes like Juvenile Law, or Death Penalty, or Water Law, etc.

At least at my school, those electives were usually taught by adjuncts, were small, and didn't rely so heavily on Socratic method. I think a class like that could easily be done online.

Hermeneutic

  • ****
  • 544
  • placenta est mendacium !
    • View Profile
Re: Should the ABA allow purely online law schools to be ABA approved?
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2016, 09:31:26 PM »
I definitely think that more online classes should be offered for 2Ls/3Ls. Not the core stuff, but classes like Juvenile Law, or Death Penalty, or Water Law, etc.

At least at my school, those electives were usually taught by adjuncts, were small, and didn't rely so heavily on Socratic method. I think a class like that could easily be done online.

I know the ABA currently allows around 15 credits (or so) that way right now as is.

Re: Should the ABA allow purely online law schools to be ABA approved?
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2016, 04:14:37 PM »
I don't think they should I think there is something to be said for the relationships that are built during law school, and learning how to show up on time, which in all honestly a huge part of actually working as a lawyer. 

I also think it will cause professors to lose motivation to simply talk to a screen, and not see students in person.  I don't it needs to change, but that is just my opinion as a random guy on the internet.

Hermeneutic

  • ****
  • 544
  • placenta est mendacium !
    • View Profile
Re: Should the ABA allow purely online law schools to be ABA approved?
« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2016, 04:32:09 PM »
I don't think they should I think there is something to be said for the relationships that are built during law school, and learning how to show up on time, which in all honestly a huge part of actually working as a lawyer. 

I also think it will cause professors to lose motivation to simply talk to a screen, and not see students in person.  I don't it needs to change, but that is just my opinion as a random guy on the internet.
Profs ALREADY CURRENTLY do it for the LLM, they somehow pull it off.

As for being a lawyer, 1. Law School is notorious for not being a prep for real practice as is. (showing up in jeans and playing on facebook, etc-I have yet to get laid ONCE in court) 2. No it isn't. Lawyers show up late to court all the dang time, most doc review jobs (that most get stuck in for life anymore) are flex schedule, and if you are a partner or work for family you can show up drunk and naked half the time and be promoted still for it. -I think you are referring to the cliché tv style MYTH of being a lawyer and law school.