Law School Discussion

Disciplinary Action in Law School--C&F?

loki13

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Re: Disciplinary Action in Law School--C&F?
« Reply #20 on: May 18, 2015, 06:47:45 AM »
opal,

I think that both maintain and I have made the same point regarding meeting with the school's administration, but this is something to discuss further with your people you trust (not on the internet).

It has been my experience that the following statements are true:
1) No law school administration would be keen to re-enroll a student without meeting with them first to make sure they pass the eye test. If you aren't able to even meet with them, that's not a good sign, no matter how many affidavits and declarations you give them.
2) If, as you keep saying, the student believes the administration "despise(s)*" them and wants to "throw [them] under the bus," then that is unlikely to be a sign that the student is in a good place to re-enroll. It is entirely possible that the administration did not deal with your illness correctly or in a timely fashion; but you should probably look at your own actions as well. Not only for this (getting back into school) but for the bar, and for your general well being. It sounds like you had some serious issues, and you were unable to continue school. While your school might not have handled it optimally, it doesn't pay to blame them. Also- an administration (a school) doesn't "despise" or have feelings or want anything. There are people (decision makers) who are risk averse who will make decisions. It would help to remember that these people will want you to end up graduating (if possible- because it's good for their numbers, etc.) while not risking any issues with the safety of the student body (since now they're on notice of these issues). I would hope that in your two prior years at that school you built a relationship with a professor or a member of the administration that you could speak about these issues with.
3)  There is a general belief among an older generation that "today's kids" are coddled by their parents (the helicopter parent thing). I think that, for the most part, this meme is overblown. Nevertheless, remember that you are an adult, and while your parents certainly can assist you, the school (and, later, the bar) is going to want to see *you* acting, not them. You taking responsibility for your treatment, your progress, you illness, and so on.

*Editing note- bracket s is strikethrough!

Re: Disciplinary Action in Law School--C&F?
« Reply #21 on: May 18, 2015, 10:11:44 AM »
The admin may not even be able to discuss your situation with your parents due to privacy requirements. (A waiver may be required). There may also be privacy issues involving the other students. Just remember that not everything the school does is to "punish" you, so to speak. They are also concerned with protecting other students who may feel threatened. These kinds of issues are taken VERY seriously nowadays.

You seem to harbor significant animosity for the admin. Maybe it's totally justified, I don't know. Do you feel that you're ready to return to law school?

opal

Re: Disciplinary Action in Law School--C&F?
« Reply #22 on: May 18, 2015, 12:59:50 PM »
I don't want anything to do with my original school.  I just want to quietly finish my degree elsewhere. I want to visit away at a local school for my 3L year so that I could complete my degree while complying with my treatment.  I do feel that I am mentally ready to return, and that is what matters most. 

I think it best that I not contact the admin people because they might feel harassed if I do so (as opposed to my parents, treatment providers, etc).  I don't want to heckle them any further.  I'm walking on thin ice at the moment. 

It's entirely different if the school ASKS to meet with me in person.  I am willing to do that if requested.  But when it comes to unsolicited contact, it's best to leave that to parents/treatment providers, or else I will be accused of harassment again. 

Re: Disciplinary Action in Law School--C&F?
« Reply #23 on: May 18, 2015, 05:58:57 PM »
I can understand that.

So, if I understand correctly, you would have to be readmitted to your old law school then you can apply to do your last year as a visiting student somewhere else.

If that's the case, I wonder if you could let them know right off the bat that you're planning on finishing somewhere else. That might make the admin a little less skittish. Maybe that was the idea your parents were going to talk to them about?

On the other hand, the admin may be concerned that if they readmit you and you don't get into another school, then they'll have to take you back. I wonder if you could somehow negotiate a conditional admission, solely for the purposes of trying to get visiting student status at another school?

Also, (I'm not trying to be negative here, but this is a major issue) are you sure that you can actually get into another school as a visiting student with the disciplinary action on your record? You might want to look into that before starting the whole readmission process.
 

opal

Re: Disciplinary Action in Law School--C&F?
« Reply #24 on: May 19, 2015, 07:03:46 AM »
I have to be readmitted to my old school before I can apply as a visiting student at the local schools.  I first have to be cleared by University Counseling Services, then by the Academic Standards Committee.

My dad is going to email the school psychologist and the dean in the first week of June requesting that I be readmitted in mid-July (so I can meet the August 1 deadline for the local schools)

Re: Disciplinary Action in Law School--C&F?
« Reply #25 on: May 19, 2015, 10:27:49 AM »
I really wouldn't have your Dad handle this.

In all honesty, if you want to be an attorney it is a big responsibility and a lot of b.s. that isn't even your fault will be placed on you. Your dad should not be handling your affairs if you are a year or so away from being an attorney. Having a license to practice law is a big responsibility and when shi* is not going your way in a case etc you can't have your Dad call.

For some reading your story it honestly sounds like you have some growing up to do. It may be the illness that is causing the problem, but as a licensed attorney you can't make excuses. If you fail to perform competent legal services due to illness, etc you can be sued for malpractice and or suspended/disbarred. Law school is not a master's in religious studies it is a gateway to some real sh**.


opal

Re: Disciplinary Action in Law School--C&F?
« Reply #26 on: May 19, 2015, 11:08:23 AM »
I really wouldn't have your Dad handle this.

In all honesty, if you want to be an attorney it is a big responsibility and a lot of b.s. that isn't even your fault will be placed on you. Your dad should not be handling your affairs if you are a year or so away from being an attorney. Having a license to practice law is a big responsibility and when shi* is not going your way in a case etc you can't have your Dad call.

For some reading your story it honestly sounds like you have some growing up to do. It may be the illness that is causing the problem, but as a licensed attorney you can't make excuses. If you fail to perform competent legal services due to illness, etc you can be sued for malpractice and or suspended/disbarred. Law school is not a master's in religious studies it is a gateway to some real sh**.

If I contact the school, I will be slapped with harassment charges, and possibly get arrested.  Do you think that a criminal record is a better outcome than having my parents/treatment providers do most of the communicating with the school administration regarding my readmission?  I'm walking on thin ice right now.  Contacting the school on my own is a very, very bad idea.   I don't know why this isn't obvious to you. 

loki13

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Re: Disciplinary Action in Law School--C&F?
« Reply #27 on: May 19, 2015, 11:26:40 AM »
"If I contact the school, I will be slapped with harassment charges, and possibly get arrested."

Um..... huh? If you send a professional letter stating that you have complied with their terms, and are seeking re-admission, then nothing bad will happen. I don't know why this is hard for you to understand. Yes, it sounds (from your very brief early description) like you did some bad things, and burned a lot of bridges. But remember- you are applying for readmission so that you can go back to law school, by showing that you are able to handle things. Not your parents.

If you are unable or unwilling to do the bare minimum necessary to get re-admitted, and would rather have your parents do those things for you, that's a choice. And you're welcome to make it. You've now heard from three practicing attorneys who have said, in various degrees of bluntness, that it would be preferable for you to take these actions- both for your own immediate chances of readmission, as well as your future prospects (vis-a-vis the bar and practicing as an attorney). If you think you would be unable to professionally communicate with the administration of your school, then perhaps you might need more than a semester off. And that's fine!

Regardless of the choice you make, I hope it works out well for you.

opal

Re: Disciplinary Action in Law School--C&F?
« Reply #28 on: May 19, 2015, 12:00:26 PM »
If I contact them, even politely, they will accuse me of harassment and file criminal charges against me.  Believe me, it's that serious.  I am walking on thin ice.  I can't afford to have any more blemishes on my C&F record.  Therefore, best to have a third party (treatment provider, parent) intervene on my behalf. 

loki13

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Re: Disciplinary Action in Law School--C&F?
« Reply #29 on: May 19, 2015, 12:18:12 PM »
opal,

I will try and explain this to you nicely. There is no monolithic "they." I have worked with my law school's administration. It is made up of people. Not "they." Real people.

So, building from that, either you have an actual, court-imposed injunction against you (which you claim you didn't), or you don't. If you don't, then you can contact the administration, which you would have to be able to do anyway in order to get re-admitted. You noted that you aren't allowed back on campus pursuant to an agreement- that's what letters are for. There's also phone calls and emails- but you might prefer the letter option first, since you can write everything out and have someone look at it.

If you can't trust yourself to be civil and professional, it's too soon. But there is no such thing as "harassment and ... criminal charges" for someone contacting the school to apply for re-admission. Unless there's a whole heck of a lot that you didn't say (but then ... that would also impact all the question you were asking, so why bother?).

If you don't want to do this yourself, don't. But don't think that this doesn't reflect badly on you, and that decision makers won't consider it, you're fooling yourself. I will point out, one last time, that you asked for advice, and three different people (attorneys) noted this. Again, if you have your own attorney IRL, ask them! Maximize your chance for success.

Anyway, I'll sign off here. Good luck.