Law School Discussion

Are there any states that let you pass on MBE scores alone anymore????

Michigan used to before 2009. Do any still exist that anyone knows of?

loki13

  • ****
  • 543
  • Exterminate all rational thought.
    • View Profile
D.C.

Take another jurisdiction's exam, and transfer in the MBE score.

loki13

  • ****
  • 543
  • Exterminate all rational thought.
    • View Profile
Here's a good website-
http://barreciprocity.com/bar-exam-mbe-transfer/

My recollection of DC was personal- I had a lot of friend who went this route, and IIRC they were able to "pass in" based on MBE scores alone. My information is based on recollection, and may be out of date.

Yes as Loki mentioned DC will allow you to waive in if you scored a 133 or higher on the MBE and Minnesota will allow you to waive in if you scored a 145 or higher. You will never actually know the score, but go to the NCBEX website request score page and pay $25.00 and they will let you know if you can waive into either or both jurisdictions. If you passed the bar you more than likely got a 133 and can waive in, but you never know.

I belivee South Dakota allows a transfer if you score 150 or higher as well, but I know for a fact DC and Minnesota allow you to waive in on the MBE.

Also, D.C. as a Federal territory and not a state has reciprocity with the vast majority of states.



Then the answer is no you have to pass a bar to waive in.

The only way to get a license to practice law without writing a bar exam essay is to attend University of Wisconsin or Marquette. The State of Wisconsin has the degree privilege for their two schools so if you graduate from those schools you automatically pass the Wisconsin Bar.

Other than that you need to pass a bar exam to practice law.

loki13

  • ****
  • 543
  • Exterminate all rational thought.
    • View Profile
lawguy,

I think it would help to understand your objective? For example, different states have different weights (heh). So you can score really high on the MBE and make up for a low score on a different part of the exam. But I assumed your question was different (iow, I've already passed the bar somewhere else, can I waive in elsewhere).

What is it that you want/are looking for? Most people have some restriction on where they will live/will practice (jobs, families, houses, networks, etc.), so it's not like you can just say, "I will choose to practice in the state where I think I have the best shot at passing the bar, and/or the requirements seem the least onerous."

IMO, most states don't have very hard portions on their state bar. I've past two bars that are widely considered two of the toughest bars in the nation (and neither with reciprocity!) and it wasn't that hard. But if you're just looking for easy, it's my understanding that South Dakota isn't too rough.

Excellent point Loki if your goal is simply to pass a bar it my understanding South Dakota is the easiest and it is a State that pays lawyers to work there. http://www.businessinsider.com/south-dakota-lawyer-subsidy-2013-4

If your goal is to work in the United States as a licensed lawyer and it doesn't matter where South Dakota will give you the best shot at passing the bar and making an income. Additionally, it is not expensive there, but I hear it can get a little cold.