Law School Discussion

Has any online laws schools lately applied for ABA accreditation?

Re: Has any online laws schools lately applied for ABA accreditation?
« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2015, 03:52:34 PM »
As a non-traditional student (with a Ph.D) pursuing an online law degree due to the need to (1) keep working my day job - my own company; and (2) not drive 4+ hours one way to the nearest part-time law program, I'd like to chime in. It seems that if I pass the California Bar, then that ought to answer all questions about my abilities to practice law in any state, not just CA. In my home state of FL, the Bar requires practice in another state for 10 (count 'em) years before I can even petition the board to graciously allow me to sit for the exam (by which time, quite frankly, I expect I'll have forgotten much of whatever law I don't end up practicing). But perhaps that is the point.

It is VERY hard to learn the law by video lectures, online chats and the reading, briefing, etc. I am envious of those of you who have other options. I do not. And I do wish the ABA would recognize that there are many parts of the country where, if you are not 22 and unemployed, online is your only option.

Re: Has any online laws schools lately applied for ABA accreditation?
« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2015, 05:53:07 PM »
Honestly if you think driving 4 hours each way, one day a week is a big deal. You are best to avoid the whole ordeal.

Re: Has any online laws schools lately applied for ABA accreditation?
« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2015, 11:34:02 AM »
Driving four hours a day one way i.e. eight hours is a big deal.

Particularly when dealing with law school.

Commuting sucks  and 4 hours one way is miserable.

As to the OP's question William & Mitchell an ABA Law School has been approved for tentative online law school. http://www.startribune.com/william-mitchell-law-school-first-to-offer-aba-approved-online-degrees/236314681/

Your situation is a problem with legal education that many 22-25 year old with no family, career, etc cannot grasp. However, this is why pursuing education early in life is ideal, but not everyone does everything perfectly or knows what they want.

There are countless areas  in the U.S. that are completely unrepresented by lawyers and states like South Dakota are paying lawyers to move there. http://ujs.sd.gov/Information/rarprogram.aspx

So there are options, but states can impose rules on their licensing requirements, but attorneys that have passed the bar from a non-aba school and wanted to practice in another state have typically won approval to take the exam. This is a huge hurdle for anyone, but it has been done.

Good luck to you.

Re: Has any online laws schools lately applied for ABA accreditation?
« Reply #13 on: September 09, 2015, 01:22:49 PM »
Honestly if you think driving 4 hours each way, one day a week is a big deal. You are best to avoid the whole ordeal.

One day a week? Like Citylaw said, it is a big deal and would probably be four or five days a week, not just one.

As to the OP's question William & Mitchell an ABA Law School has been approved for tentative online law school. http://www.startribune.com/william-mitchell-law-school-first-to-offer-aba-approved-online-degrees/236314681/

I think the William Mitchell program is a hybrid of in-class and online instruction. The fact that they were already an established ABA school probably helped a lot, as opposed to an unaccredited online program trying to get ABA approval.

Re: Has any online laws schools lately applied for ABA accreditation?
« Reply #14 on: September 09, 2015, 04:48:02 PM »
First, it is NOT a BIGGER (compare and contrast) deal than all the rest that goes with it. Its cost benefit analysis.
And part time weekend law school is (at most) two days, often one day if you know how to schedule right after the first term. I've know people first hand who did just that.

Plus the idea of not wanting to quit your current job or move, I'm not sure if you grasp this but that 10 year clock to petition in your home state NEVER STARTS AT ALL until AFTER YOU MOVE to California and practice there (new state, new job) for that decade. Its not just a magic "you were licensed, good enough" thing.

Plus do you even know what the FYBX is, or how that works? What about the actual bar exam and going all the way out there to sit that? Have you looked into the stats on how many pass it from online law schools who are working?

Honestly, come on now. If you can't get past the idea of a mild drive one a week (and maybe staying in a hotel overnight until the other weekend classes the next day) just don't do it all. If you cant do that, you can't even fathom doing what the rest of it requires.

William Mitchell is ABA and that is great, but not your state. Hybrid sure, but still on campus state is ANOTHER STATE (far more commute when commute is required).  I'd say that is better than non aba, but factor in the downsides to that too. Its non ABA online, its ABA hybrid.

Re: Has any online laws schools lately applied for ABA accreditation?
« Reply #15 on: September 09, 2015, 05:15:21 PM »
The fact is you don't know how many days it will be and 4 hours one way is 8 hours total. That is ridiculous nobody can do that.

OP can try to get licensed through an online school maybe even through the hybrid program.

It is not an easy road.

OP should contact the state bar they are in and see what alternatives they offer. Maybe if you are in South Dakota a state so desperate for lawyers they are paying them to come there the South Dakota Bar might let you sit for the exam if you pass the California FYLSE . Crazier things have happened.

OP acknowledges it is a hard road, but an eight hour commute in a day is not sustainable even in a week.

It is unfortunate that certain areas of the country are not adequately represented.

Alaska does not even have a law school, South Dakota and North Dakota have one, Montana has one, Idaho has one, so on and so on. For people living in non-metropolitan areas that want to obtain a legal education are at a severe disadvantage.

I route for anyone like OP to challenge the system and find ways around it. Whether they succeed or not that is another story, but you can certainly try.


Re: Has any online laws schools lately applied for ABA accreditation?
« Reply #16 on: September 09, 2015, 05:41:15 PM »
The fact is you don't know how many days it will be and 4 hours one way is 8 hours total. That is ridiculous nobody can do that.

OP can try to get licensed through an online school maybe even through the hybrid program.

It is not an easy road.

OP should contact the state bar they are in and see what alternatives they offer. Maybe if you are in South Dakota a state so desperate for lawyers they are paying them to come there the South Dakota Bar might let you sit for the exam if you pass the California FYLSE . Crazier things have happened.

OP acknowledges it is a hard road, but an eight hour commute in a day is not sustainable even in a week.

It is unfortunate that certain areas of the country are not adequately represented.

Alaska does not even have a law school, South Dakota and North Dakota have one, Montana has one, Idaho has one, so on and so on. For people living in non-metropolitan areas that want to obtain a legal education are at a severe disadvantage.

I route for anyone like OP to challenge the system and find ways around it. Whether they succeed or not that is another story, but you can certainly try.
Um....Yeah I do (and so does anyone with a calculator) The weeks of the semester x 12 (3 per year, 4 years total)
And again, its cost benefit analysis. Saying that the mile is too far to walk, so you crawl 12 miles? Come on people. Cost benefit analysis.

But whatever, I don't care. I'm licensed. I'm good. OP will likely never go anywhere and we all know it. She already has a PhD, a job, and likes where she lives and doesn't want to commute.

I guess look into the EJD if you just something to hang off the wall. Concords is Regionally accredited. 100% Useless, but qualifies for student loans and all the usual stuff.  Honestly OP, I think that is what you are looking for. I know a guy who has one. I think he's a fool. But he seems happy with it.
http://www.concordlawschool.edu/Executive_Juris_Doctor.aspx

Re: Has any online laws schools lately applied for ABA accreditation?
« Reply #17 on: September 10, 2015, 12:07:15 PM »
Or maybe OP will whoop both of our asses in court.

Plenty of people do well from various law schools, plenty do terribly from great law schools, so on and so on. A non-aba school is not ideal.

You also don't know what the class schedule is or what days they have to be there.

Essentially, you don't know anything about her life.

What if you got offered a job in South Dakota for $250,000? Would you take it?  I would not, but perhaps you would, maybe OP would. It is a chance that many people would jump at, others would not even consider, etc.

Basically everyone wants different things and has different priorities.

You cannot possibly know what is best for OP and she couldn't call you an idiot for not taking the $250,000 job in South Dakota. 

Everyone considering any law school needs to consider what is best for them, because each person's story is unique.

Is an ABA school better than a non-aba school? Yes.
Is Harvard a better ABA school than University of San Francisco? Yes.
Should someone uproot their whole life to attend an ABA school or Harvard instead of a non-aba school or less elite ABA school the right decision? It depends. (For some absolutely, others absolutely not, and others have a cost/benefit analysis.

Is making $250,000 better than making $125,000? Yes
Should someone uproot their entire life to double their salary? For some absolutely, for others absolutely not, and others a detailed cost/benefit analysis most ensue.

You don't know OP and she doesn't know you. She is aware that her current school is not ABA approved, she would obviously love it to be, but sometimes you have to compromise in fact most times you do.




Re: Has any online laws schools lately applied for ABA accreditation?
« Reply #18 on: September 10, 2015, 02:08:23 PM »
The fact is you don't know how many days it will be and 4 hours one way is 8 hours total. That is ridiculous nobody can do that.

OP can try to get licensed through an online school maybe even through the hybrid program.

It is not an easy road.

OP should contact the state bar they are in and see what alternatives they offer. Maybe if you are in South Dakota a state so desperate for lawyers they are paying them to come there the South Dakota Bar might let you sit for the exam if you pass the California FYLSE . Crazier things have happened.

OP acknowledges it is a hard road, but an eight hour commute in a day is not sustainable even in a week.

It is unfortunate that certain areas of the country are not adequately represented.

Alaska does not even have a law school, South Dakota and North Dakota have one, Montana has one, Idaho has one, so on and so on. For people living in non-metropolitan areas that want to obtain a legal education are at a severe disadvantage.

I route for anyone like OP to challenge the system and find ways around it. Whether they succeed or not that is another story, but you can certainly try.
No one can do that? MOST do that in the weekend programs. MOST.

Re: Has any online laws schools lately applied for ABA accreditation?
« Reply #19 on: September 10, 2015, 02:22:57 PM »
Most people do not have 8 hour commutes, truck drivers do so yes you are correct I overstated and some people can, but I don't know if most do an 8 hour commute.

I have never done an eight hour commute for any legal work. Once in a blue moon I have to go from San Francisco to Federal Court in Sacramento, which is a 1.5-2 hours one way and a 4 hour round trip. Those days are miserable and I have done other work on those, days but I am operating at low levels.  I could technically get to NYC in 8 hours with the time difference from Cali if I left right now, but I would be drained and so would anyone else.

Maybe when you do an 8 hour commute you can say it isn't so bad, but I am not sure if your a law student or lawyer. However, if either your law school or office said at least 4 or 5 times a month and probably you will need to make an eight hour round-trip you might be a little upset. You might even change jobs or transfer schools.