Law School Discussion

Need advice on Personal Statement Conclusion

Need advice on Personal Statement Conclusion
« on: December 01, 2014, 10:56:17 AM »
Should I write a conclusion for each individual school, or just one generic one?

My personal statement is about wanting to help immigrants as an immigrant. Not sappy, or cheesy (hopefully).

Dont know a good way to end my PS that is simple and sweet.


Re: Need advice on Personal Statement Conclusion
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2014, 04:35:48 PM »
I wouldn't if it feels at all like you are merely tacking it on at the end. In other words, if you are specifically tying in the school's programs/professors/etc with your personal statement, then ok. But if its a "insert school name" here kind of conclusion, I would avoid it. Also, research the FAQ sections for the school's admissions department. Several schools (like Yale) explicitly state they don't want you to take up real estate by, essentially, just blowing smoke - i.e., they don't want to see their name on the PS at all. Others welcome it.

I personally wrote school specific conclusions for the schools that had the programs I was really interested in (that fit in 100% with my PS). Other than that, I wrote generic conclusions.

In the end, I doubt it really makes much of a difference. If you have the time and can make the school specific conclusion sincere - go for it. Other than that, don't worry about it.

Re: Need advice on Personal Statement Conclusion
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2014, 05:58:57 PM »
It will make little difference, but I know when I did mine I had a final sentence that said allowed me to plug in the name of the school at the end.

You could say something along the lines of I look forward to learning how to assist immigrants with achieving their dreams at  (INSERT LAW SCHOOL). Law School is well known for their outstanding legal education curriculum and I know that if I am admitted there (INSERT LAW SCHOOL) will be proud to call me an alumni.

At the end of the day, however your personal statement means little to your chances of admission. It is based almost entirely on LSAT/GPA.

Good luck on your pursuit of legal education.

Re: Need advice on Personal Statement Conclusion
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2014, 06:31:20 PM »
You could say something along the lines of I look forward to learning how to assist immigrants with achieving their dreams at  (INSERT LAW SCHOOL). Law School is well known for their outstanding legal education curriculum and I know that if I am admitted there (INSERT LAW SCHOOL) will be proud to call me an alumni.
This is blatantly transparent. Admissions rolls their eyes at these.

barprephero

Re: Need advice on Personal Statement Conclusion
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2014, 07:19:39 PM »
Literally NO ONE cares about that letter. Seriously don't overthink it. It's valued even lower than references, which are also almost more ceremonial than anything else. "Can" it matter? Sure. But 99% of the time it's just filling in the box since its a requirement.

Just don't write it in crayon with spelling errors and swears and you should be fine.

Re: Need advice on Personal Statement Conclusion
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2014, 07:35:50 PM »
Have to disagree. Personal statement can be much more helpful or harmful to an applicant than references. While no one is immune from their numbers, an amazing story or a poorly-written personal statement has a much more meaningful impact on the admissions committee than the usually dry letters. This matters the most when the applicant is competitive, but not a presumptive admit by the numbers, presumably the kinds of schools about which an applicant would care.

Re: Need advice on Personal Statement Conclusion
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2014, 08:52:49 AM »
I think they matter as well, and as to the earlier comment agreed the conclusion I wrote will not win any awards, but I think it works. I think many applicants struggle for months on their personal statement, and that at the end of the day I think that is way to much time, because your numbers will make or break you, and you either have a truly inspirational story or you don't.

No matter how well you write about interning at X law office, or your desire to help people, etc admissions officers will likely roll their eyes, but at least you submitted a competent statement.  If you rescued orphans as a Navy Seal in Iraq spend time telling that story as well as possible, but 95% of law school applicants do not have a page-turning story to tell.


barprephero

Re: Need advice on Personal Statement Conclusion
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2014, 01:29:00 PM »
Maybe I worded it poorly, I meant its not enough to make up for GPA and LSAT and that even someone with horrible everything else but great GPA and LSAT will win vs perfect everything else and questionable GPA or LSAT. (based on what I've seen and heard in real life)

Re: Need advice on Personal Statement Conclusion
« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2014, 02:26:54 PM »
It made sense it is meaningless, but not that high of a priority. At the end of the day GPA/LSAT make up 90-95% of your LSAT, and again unless you have a great story to tell worrying about a perfect personal statement is not that important, and most people do not have that exciting of a story to tell.


Re: Need advice on Personal Statement Conclusion
« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2014, 05:22:04 PM »
One mustn't have done something incredible to write a great personal statement. The best personal statements I've read were sincere and self-aware, gave me an idea about the applicant. None of the most outstanding personal statements I've read were about any particularly noteworthy achievements, but the writing set them apart. Years later, I remember one about playing the cello. The applicant wasn't particularly skilled in the cello, a competent college player at best, and made no effort to appear otherwise, but she described what it meant to her in a way that gave me understanding of who she was.

I feel like this discussion is partially missing the point. By the time one is writing a personal statement, one should already have an LSAT and GPA. Yes, those are the most important factors, and will account for 90% of your admissions chances. But that remaining margin is likely to matter at reach or target schools, where applicants are in a pile getting more scrutiny and either neither presumptively denied nor admitted(competitive) or slight presumptive deny.

In sum, the personal statement is important because it's the biggest factor outside of LSAT and GPA, which should already be determined by the time an applicant writes a personal statement. This matters the most for schools an applicant is most concerned about, the target and reach schools. It absolutely makes the difference at the best law schools where an applicant is likely to be admitted.