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Author Topic: Thoughts on Touro Law School?  (Read 260 times)

jmazz88

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Thoughts on Touro Law School?
« on: August 06, 2014, 12:34:38 PM »
Okay so I'm debating on attending Touro Law School this Fall with a 50% scholarship. Since i'm living with with my parents I will be around 80k in debt with all things considered. My other options are St. Johns or Hofstra at sticker (200k+ after graduation debt). I would be happy with a small law firm job out on Long Island and obviously am not expecting to work at a big firm. What do you guys think? Anyone familiar with Touro and/or the Long Island market? Also, I can't retake the LSAT.

Citylaw

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Re: Thoughts on Touro Law School?
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2014, 01:49:58 PM »
Any ABA school will provide you with a quality education and if you want to work in Long Island attend law school in Long Island.

With that said I believe any incoming law student should consider the following five factors in this order. (1) Location; (2) Cost; (3) Personal Feelings about School; (4) Understanding the reality of legal education; (5) Last and least U.S. News ranking. I will apply each of these factors to your situation.

1. Location:
You are looking at NY schools, which is a good sign. Many students myself included as a idiotic 0L apply all over the country and think the City you attend law school does not matter, but it is for all intents and purposes the most important factor.

From your post it appears like Long Island is where you want to be so Touro or Hofstra are your best options, and if you can live with your parents and not pay rent for three years that is a significant savings. Additionally, your parents can probably be a source of comfort and take care of a lot of the little random things that will allow you to focus during 1L when it is extremely stressful.

I think Touro or Hofstra would work for location.

2) Cost
Congrats on the scholarship that is great, but one thing to ask is what are the conditions. Most law schools require you to maintain a 3.0 GPA or maintain some standing in the class. As an incoming law student you know your going to work hard and will certainly obtain a 3.0 GPA, but that is what 100% of your class thinks as every law student is smart, hard-working, and motivated. Additionally, law schools is not graded like undergrad and typically only 35% of the class can maintain a 3.0 GPA, which means there is a 65% chance you will lose your scholarship years 2 and 3. I don't know what the conditions of your scholarship are, but I strongly encourage you to ask. This NY Times Article does a great job summing up what happens when law students don't ask. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/01/business/law-school-grants.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

I also encourage you to negotiate for more scholarship money and better conditions.

You may also want to consider City University of New York since it only $13,000 per year for an in-state resident. In-State ABA schools are the best deal out there if you happen to be a resident of the state, which I assume you are in New York.

(3) Personal Feelings about the school
Another very important factor to consider is your personal feelings about the school. The only person that can really know whether a school fits you is you. Therefore, I strongly encourage you to visit any school you are interested in talk to professors, admins, students, walk around the campus, the neighborhood, and see what school feels right. I visited a number of schools as a OL and there were some that rubbed me the wrong way and others I loved. What is best for you can only be answered by a visit and your gut will have a reaction, which is something you should listen to.

(4) Understanding the Reality of Legal Education:

Whether you attend Touro, Hofstra, St. John's etc you will obtain a quality education. All ABA schools are highly regulated and for all intents and purposes you learn the same thing. During law school you read supreme court cases and the Supreme Court does not write seperate opinions for different schools nor does the law change if you attend a different school.

Many people get all wrapped up in this, but all schools will teach you the law and it will then be up to you pass the bar exam.

(5) U.S. News:
Remember this is nothing more than a for-profit unregulated magazine offering an opinion. Do not let it be the basis of a life altering decision.

Good luck whatever you decide.