Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Law School Admission Options  (Read 304 times)

brmosher1015

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Law School Admission Options
« on: August 03, 2014, 04:21:18 PM »
If I have a 2.727 GPA currently entering senior year and am assuming it will be around a 3.0 when I graduate, what potential law schools would I be able to get into if I get between 160-170 on the LSAT?

Miami88

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 153
    • View Profile
Re: Law School Admission Options
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2014, 07:05:49 PM »
1) 160-170 is a HUGE range. Really, this is the difference between schools ranked in the Top 10 and around 50ish. University of Florida is not the same as UMichigan.

I would recommend spending some time messing with  http://www.lawschoolpredictor.com/wp-content/uploads/Law-School-Predictor-Full-Time-Programs.htm

as well as

lawschoolnumbers.com and

This is where the predictor grabs its data fyi.


All that said,

If you end up with a 3.0 and a 160, you are in okay shape for schools ranked between 50-100 and in good shape for schools outside the top 100. If you end up with a 170, you are looking at Top 50 schools.


Note on ranking

Don't get worried about its hype. The reality is the strong majority of schools outside of the Top20 have pretty similar employment figures. Between T14 and T100, there are surely differences, but no the same as T6 v. sub-T100 schools. In other words, for the schools you would be considering, ranking plays a relatively small role in your end career. The big factor that will drive your employment (and, lets face it, that is the whole point for law school) out of these schools will be the particular school's regional pull. Therefore, apply to as many schools in the region you hope to live and work in after law school.

Done.

Good luck!


brmosher1015

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Law School Admission Options
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2014, 11:01:14 PM »
Thank you! That information was very helpful and you make a great point about the ranking differential. I am a Finance major and have just began exploring the option of law school and a career as a lawyer.

Citylaw

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 309
    • View Profile
Re: Law School Admission Options
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2014, 11:09:56 AM »
Excellent advice from Miami above.

One thing to realize is that the odds of you scoring a 160-170 are very low particularly if you have a 2.72 GPA. It is certainly possible to score in the 160-170, but that puts you in the top 10-20% of college graduates, that are motivated enough to want to attend law school, and have the fortitude to actually take the test.  There is a 80-90% chance you will not score in the top 10-20% of test takers.

With that said scoring below a 160 does not mean you cannot have a successful legal career and there are a number of ABA schools that you can be admitted to with less than a 160 LSAT.

I recommend getting the best grades possible to finish out your undergrad career as a 2.72 is on the very low end of acceptable for admission standards to any ABA school. One way to boost your GPA is take some easy classes to get an A. Law school admissions do not really review all your courses just the number so if you can get an A or two in Frisbee Golf to boost your GPA then I recommend going for it.

Also take the LSAT when your ready and once you have a final GPA/LSAT you will realistically know what your options are.

Good luck in your pursuit of a J.D.


Maintain FL 350

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 682
    • View Profile
Re: Law School Admission Options
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2014, 12:02:27 PM »
Until you have an actual LSAT score and final GPA everything is pure speculation. As Miami said, 160-170 is a huge range and your law school options would vary quite a bit depending on your specific score.

That said, assuming you score a 3.0 and somewhere in the mid 160s you would have many options. Elite schools and the T14 are out. They have so many applicants with high GPAs and LSATs that there is no real incentive to take a risk on applicants with lower numbers.

Many respected regional and local law schools, however, would accept an applicant with such numbers. Once you get an LSAC GPA and LSAT score, my advice would be to think about where you want to live and how you can avoid debt. Once you get away from the elite schools rankings matter less and geography and connections matter more.