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Am I considered a minority?

Yes
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No
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Author Topic: Am I a Minority According to LSAC Standards?  (Read 603 times)

silverdoe91

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Am I a Minority According to LSAC Standards?
« on: July 21, 2014, 08:44:46 PM »
Hi, everybody. I'm new to this forum. I wanted to know if I would be considered an "Underrepresented Minority" or URM by LSAC standards. I belong to a minority group from Central Asia, that is very underrepresented in America (there's less than 100,000 of us in the US altogether). I am Jewish, and I come from a country that was part of the former USSR. I came here when I was 3 as a religious refugee, seeking religious freedom. My native languages are Russian and a dialect of Persian. There are a lot of lawyers within my community, but not many go to top notch schools (any of the tier one schools for example) so my ethnic group would be underrepresented in those schools. So what do you guys think? Am I considered an underrepresented minority by LSAC standards? Please leave your answers in the poll above, and leave explanations below. Thanks!

FreshlyMinted

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Re: Am I a Minority According to LSAC Standards?
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2014, 12:42:35 AM »
Does this group have a name?
Jews and Asians are represented rather well in law school

Maintain FL 350

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Re: Am I a Minority According to LSAC Standards?
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2014, 08:25:43 PM »
You can always write a diversity statement and make your case, but I doubt if it will make much difference. My understanding is that it's not just about whether there are few lawyers from your specific group, but lots of sociological and historical factors weigh into the equation. For example, there probably aren't many white South African lawyers in the U.S. either, but a white South African isn't considered URM.

I don't think being Jewish/Russian/Persian is going to make any difference, as none of those groups are underrepresented as compared to their percentage of the population.

FreshlyMinted

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Re: Am I a Minority According to LSAC Standards?
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2014, 09:34:49 PM »
You can always write a diversity statement and make your case, but I doubt if it will make much difference. My understanding is that it's not just about whether there are few lawyers from your specific group, but lots of sociological and historical factors weigh into the equation. For example, there probably aren't many white South African lawyers in the U.S. either, but a white South African isn't considered URM.

I don't think being Jewish/Russian/Persian is going to make any difference, as none of those groups are underrepresented as compared to their percentage of the population.
good point, even if not a URM you can still mention it

Groundhog

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Re: Am I a Minority According to LSAC Standards?
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2014, 12:12:55 PM »
Won't hurt, probably won't help much.

silverdoe91

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Re: Am I a Minority According to LSAC Standards?
« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2014, 07:22:59 PM »
I understand that I won't be qualified for Affirmative Action (since it's made specifically to correct historical inequalities in the admissions process) but I know that law schools generally try to have a diverse student body, and I've heard they like to accept people from diverse backgrounds into their schools, just so they could boast about the diversity of their school, even if that diversity is negligible. For example, I hear some schools like to accept people from different states, just to increase their level of inter-state diversity. Or accept a student from a country that is underrepresented in their college. Does any of that hold true? If so, would I be considered one of these "diversity" targets?

My ethnic group is Bukharian.

FreshlyMinted

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Re: Am I a Minority According to LSAC Standards?
« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2014, 07:57:20 PM »
Were you born in America?

silverdoe91

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Re: Am I a Minority According to LSAC Standards?
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2014, 10:41:09 AM »
No, I was born in Uzbekistan.

FreshlyMinted

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Re: Am I a Minority According to LSAC Standards?
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2014, 07:32:22 PM »
No, I was born in Uzbekistan.
Behind the curtain?

If so that might be a really good argument. Otherwise you might just be treated as any foreign student. (ex: someone from Japan)

silverdoe91

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Re: Am I a Minority According to LSAC Standards?
« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2014, 12:14:23 PM »
No, I was born in Uzbekistan.
Behind the curtain?

If so that might be a really good argument. Otherwise you might just be treated as any foreign student. (ex: someone from Japan)

What do you mean by "Behind the curtain"?

If you're referring to whether or not I was born when the country was still part of the Soviet Union, then yes, but only 3 months later the country gained its soverneighty so I don't think that makes much of a difference.  :P

I think a foregin student, such as someone from Japan would definitely have a leg up in the admissions process, simply because being a transfer student is so rare, as well as learning the English language etc., but I don't think I have that benefit, because I was basically raised in America, so I am not considered "Foreign." I'm an immigrant, but I'm still American.