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Author Topic: Sleep as a Competitive Advantage  (Read 335 times)

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Sleep as a Competitive Advantage
« on: June 30, 2014, 03:44:19 PM »
Just a quick PSA reminder that sleep is incredibly important, including during LSAT prep:

http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2014/06/27/sleep-as-a-competitive-advantage/

Quote
Too many of us continue to live by the durable myth that one less hour of sleep gives us one more hour of productivity. In reality, each hour less of sleep not only leaves us feeling more fatigued, but also takes a pernicious toll on our cognitive capacity. The more consecutive hours we are awake and the fewer we sleep at night, the less alert, focused and efficient we become, and the lower the quality of our work.

The research is overwhelming that the vast majority of us require seven to eight hours of sleep to feel fully rested, and only a small percentage require less than seven.

Citylaw

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Re: Sleep as a Competitive Advantage
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2014, 11:33:37 PM »
That is very true and also many people think putting in hours alone leads to productivity, but they need to be actual beneficial hours.

You can sit and stare at a computer screen for 6 hours and read the same line over and over again your not getting anything done or you can intensely study for 2 hours and retain something.


FreshlyMinted

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Re: Sleep as a Competitive Advantage
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2014, 01:47:28 AM »
That's fine if you live with your parents and have the semester off for the summer to prep, not so much if you are working 50 hours a week and have a teething child.

Your experiences may vary

Citylaw

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Re: Sleep as a Competitive Advantage
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2014, 10:35:37 AM »
There are certainly times when you have to burn the midnight oil, but in my anonymous internet poster opinion I think if you are able to realize when you cannot comprehend anymore you are better off stopping and making sure you restart at a reasonable time the next hour.

My first semester of law school I put in probably 80 hours a week, but that was my worst semester after I put in between 40-50 hours a week and performed far better, because I was not overthinking things and actually comprehending what I was reading.

Of course each individual has their own way of doing things, but I do notice people often think the more time you put in means better results, but a lot of times working smarter and not harder is a way to succeed.

Julie Fern

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Re: Sleep as a Competitive Advantage
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2014, 03:07:19 PM »
julie asleep right now!