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Gunner.:
Not sure if you have this link already

http://web.wmitchell.edu/admissions/hybrid-program/

William Mitchell is proud to be the first ABA-accredited law school in the country to offer a part-time, on-campus/online J.D. program—known as the hybrid program.

The first-of-its-kind program starts in January 2015 and features two interrelated elements: intensive in-person experiential learning and online coursework that allows students to study the law from anywhere in the world

DeltaBravoKS:
Wow, is this some type of A.B.A. authorized experiment?  The first few schools to get in on this type of program stand to make a lot of money with an influx of students who have been waiting for something like this.  If it truly is the beginning trial of something to come, there will be some money to be made for the next several years.

Gunner.:

--- Quote from: DeltaBravoKS on May 19, 2014, 10:43:39 PM ---Wow, is this some type of A.B.A. authorized experiment?  The first few schools to get in on this type of program stand to make a lot of money with an influx of students who have been waiting for something like this.  If it truly is the beginning trial of something to come, there will be some money to be made for the next several years.

--- End quote ---

It will be interesting to see how it goes. I am shocked that Cooley wasn't the first one to do it to be honest.

DeltaBravoKS:
It makes me wonder how this came about.  Did WM beg, plead, and bribe the ABA to allow this or has the ABA been considering a trial and picked WM as the best candidate to control...er, I mean experiment with?

Gunner.:

--- Quote from: DeltaBravoKS on May 20, 2014, 07:21:07 AM ---It makes me wonder how this came about.  Did WM beg, plead, and bribe the ABA to allow this or has the ABA been considering a trial and picked WM as the best candidate to control...er, I mean experiment with?

--- End quote ---

The lean has been going that way for awhile. Awhile back the ABA approved a full semester worth of "distance education" courses towards your degree. Most of those are on campus with a class watching a speaker through a two way TV screen, but not much different than at home in a chatroom.

Also, there has been TWEN, CaliLessons, school blackboards, portals, emailing in assignments
plus (for even longer) there has been "independent study" courses where a prof has only lose control over your studies, classes with take home finals, etc.

Plus undergrads have lots of online options that students are used to, Barprep and LLMS are online now (more common online than on campus in many cases), other professions have online options for even PharmD(as scary as that may be) CA has been doing it for years, historically "reading for the law" is pretty common, plus this isn't "really" an "online" course since it still requires at least some on campus time. It just takes the percentages and leans a bit more towards online vs on campus than the "traditional" courses which are largely online nowdays anyways with the lean just not as severe.

It will be interesting to see how their bar pass rates compare to on campus at the same university in a few years. Online grads tend to do worse than non online, as do part time students vs full time students, but I suspect both of those is largely due to them being nontrade students. If they had a pure online part time program but only offered it to people with a 170 LSAT and 3.5 undergrad GPA, I suspect the percentages would lean in the other direction.

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