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Author Topic: Practice of "Law" w/out a License  (Read 1719 times)

Maintain FL 350

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Re: Practice of "Law" w/out a License
« Reply #30 on: June 04, 2014, 12:14:58 PM »
Well, my guess is that nearly all DL begin their JD studies with the intent to become a lawyer. They look at the stats and say "Ok, I'll be in that 15% that passes and gets licensed." For a few this works out fine, they get licensed, and have successful careers as solo practitioners or small firm lawyers. For most it doesn't, and these careers could offer viable alternatives. 

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Re: Practice of "Law" w/out a License
« Reply #31 on: June 04, 2014, 12:31:39 PM »
Well, my guess is that nearly all DL begin their JD studies with the intent to become a lawyer. They look at the stats and say "Ok, I'll be in that 15% that passes and gets licensed." For a few this works out fine, they get licensed, and have successful careers as solo practitioners or small firm lawyers. For most it doesn't, and these careers could offer viable alternatives.

I would agree with this, if we removed the word "viable"

Maintain FL 350

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Re: Practice of "Law" w/out a License
« Reply #32 on: June 04, 2014, 06:27:38 PM »
Well, my guess is that nearly all DL begin their JD studies with the intent to become a lawyer. They look at the stats and say "Ok, I'll be in that 15% that passes and gets licensed." For a few this works out fine, they get licensed, and have successful careers as solo practitioners or small firm lawyers. For most it doesn't, and these careers could offer viable alternatives.

I would agree with this, if we removed the work "viable"

Depends on the individual. If someone is smart, personable, and knows how to hustle they can make a decent career out of one of these fields.

On the other hand someone can have a JD, pass the bar, and still be unemployable because they can't get along with people, lack common sense, etc. It all comes down to personal attributes (or lack thereof).

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Re: Practice of "Law" w/out a License
« Reply #33 on: June 04, 2014, 06:35:20 PM »
Well, my guess is that nearly all DL begin their JD studies with the intent to become a lawyer. They look at the stats and say "Ok, I'll be in that 15% that passes and gets licensed." For a few this works out fine, they get licensed, and have successful careers as solo practitioners or small firm lawyers. For most it doesn't, and these careers could offer viable alternatives.

I would agree with this, if we removed the work "viable"

Depends on the individual. If someone is smart, personable, and knows how to hustle they can make a decent career out of one of these fields.

On the other hand someone can have a JD, pass the bar, and still be unemployable because they can't get along with people, lack common sense, etc. It all comes down to personal attributes (or lack thereof).
we're talking fraction of a percent in that extreme compared to an extreme. Focusing just on the second example, not really true. They might have to settle for something "beneath" them, but their ODDS of getting SOMETHING are better (far better) even if we're talking the best of the best compared to the worst of the worst.

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Re: Practice of "Law" w/out a License
« Reply #34 on: June 07, 2014, 04:46:14 AM »
I forgot about this before (and I don't think anyone mentioned it yet) but Mediation. Most states have a separate license for it that does not require a JD (just an internship under others) It allows you to do ADR type law that many lawyers end up doing anyways.

They are largely volunteer jobs, but its an idea.


Also, most states have programs to advocate for orphans and abused kids. Also largely unpaid, but here is an example link of a place that provides training for it too. http://www.childadvocates.org/volunteer/court-appointed

Both fall short of requiring a JD but still have some training and supervision requirements before getting licensed/certified and let you do duties traditionally assigned to attorneys.

jonlevy

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Re: Practice of "Law" w/out a License
« Reply #35 on: August 03, 2014, 01:04:12 PM »
Yes, you have also got a whole field of Special Education Advocates.

Having a 4 year DL law degree would be a big plus; all these non attorney advocacy jobs rely very heavily on understanding and interpreting rules.  That is something a JD would be able to do while someone without a law degree would likely be ineffective at best.  They also all provide services that people need.