Law School Discussion

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Marquette or Chicago-Kent

Marquette
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Chicago-Kent
 1 (100%)

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Author Topic: Marquette or Chicago-Kent  (Read 275 times)

JPchicago

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Marquette or Chicago-Kent
« on: December 19, 2013, 11:54:42 AM »
Looking for some help here! I have been admitted to both and am looking for a good education while avoiding the politics of back stabbing and sabotaging fellow class mates. I love Chicago, but Marquette being the only school in Milwaukee makes the job market, although much smaller, slightly less competitive. But living I am from Chicago and know that Kent has a decent reputation and staying in my city would also be awesome. Also Marquette is slightly cheaper as well as cost of living is less. Where should I go?

Hopefully someone can help.

Maintain FL 350

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Re: Marquette or Chicago-Kent
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2013, 04:30:10 PM »
Think about what you want to do after school, and where you want to live, because you will most likely end up working in the city where you attend law school.

Both Marquette and Kent are essentially local/regional schools, and the connections you make during law school will be very important when it comes time to look for a job. When you're talking about local reputation schools, it's important to understand that most of the opportunities to make such connections, via internships for example, will also be local. Although both schools have decent reputations, they aren't the kind of elite schools whose name alone will open doors outside of their region.

So, if you wanted to be a prosecutor in Chicago, for example, you'd probably be better off attending Kent which would give you the opportunity to effectively compete for internships at the DA's office. Could you still land such an internship coming from Marquette? Sure, but it will likely be harder, and you'll have to compete against local talent who have better access to the system. When I was a law student I scored a very competitive government internship because one of the head attorneys was also an adjunct at my law school. If I had just applied to the position blindly and as an out of towner, I would have had no chance. The same goes for most private law firms. It's crucial to make local connections in the city in which you plan to live.