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Author Topic: Question about undergraduate W's  (Read 160 times)

cherylann

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Question about undergraduate W's
« on: December 13, 2013, 06:23:04 PM »
I am an undergraduate student and I received a 170 LSAT. However, I have yet to send in my transcripts to LSAC. I have a 3.3 transcript gpa, but expect slightly lower since they do an absolute gpa.

I am very concerned about the undergraduate course withdrawals (W's). At my school, they do not count in the gpa, so to me, that seems like they would be non-punitive. There is even a link on the LSAC website, called Interpretive Guide to Undergraduate grading systems under publications, where you can type in your school and it tells you what LSAC omits, and they have Ws from my school listed as omitted.  On my school transcript key, they have a list of grades on the key (AU, I, W) listed in the grades that don't effect gpa section.

The reason I am worried, is because there seems to be a lot of confusion on here about withdrawals counting as punitive. Is this just an arbitrary thing? A representative told me that each school gives them info on how to treat each grade.  so my questions:

1). Is there anyone on here that had a W (not WF) and LSAC counted yours as an F?

2). Is that Interpretive guide link, where you can type in your school accurate?

Miami88

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Re: Question about undergraduate W's
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2013, 08:57:18 PM »
I don't have a direct comment, but I'd say... don't worry about it. There really isn't anything you can do about your LSDAS UGPA at this point. Finish out your degree as amazingly as possible, write some killer essays, get impeccable recommendations... Everything else is out of your control and not worth your time worrying about. Your LSAT is phenomenal and will help you get into equally phenomenal schools.

Also, if your GPAs are really off, you could write an addendum (so long as there are significant circumstances that warrants the addendum aside from the gpa difference).

Good luck!