Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: What are my chances?  (Read 1339 times)

IPlaw09

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
    • Email
What are my chances?
« on: November 20, 2013, 09:16:06 AM »
Hi Everyone,

I'm a Junior, bio major business minor at a top 50 liberal arts school.
My current GPA is 3.0, without taking into account grades received from high school classes that were college credit from community colleges. Do law schools calculate your GPA taking into account every grade you received from any institution? My university does not count those grades into my GPA. I had lots of trouble with my science classes early on and that's what explains the low GPA.

I hope to get a 4.0 (or 3.8) this semester, based on that my overall GPA will be around a 3.1. I am planning to take the LSATs in June. What should be a reasonable goal for the LSAT based on my GPA? I'll be enrolled in a Kaplan Prep class.

I appreciate your help!

IPlaw09

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: What are my chances?
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2013, 09:29:25 AM »
that smiley is supposed to represent an "8"

Miami88

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 153
    • View Profile
Re: What are my chances?
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2013, 10:25:09 AM »
Note: The majority of an application decision is based on your GPA and LSAT scores. Soft factors will boost your application if you are borderline. Be sure to make explicit any soft factors that are not completely apparent from your application.

1) Bio major may add a nice soft factor boost to your application.

2) If I read you post correctly, you have a strong upward GPA trend. This is another soft factor boost.

3) There is no "reasonable" GPA-LSAT match. Your goal is to get as high of a GPA as possible and as high of a LSAT as possible. If you are asking when you should abandon your practice and take the LSAT, then the answer is whenever you feel you are completely ready.

4) LSAC will factor in all college credits up until your first bachelor degree is awarded. So, yes, your high school college credits will factor into your GPA - even though it is not factored into your current GPA. So if those grades are lower than your current GPA, expect something lower. lawschoolpredictor.com has a GPA predictor where you can include your high school gpa to get a better idea of what to expect.

Check out lawschoolnumbers.com and lawschoolpredictor.com for a loose guestamation of your chances (given the projected GPA) into a particular school and what LSAT you will need.

Good luck!

IPlaw09

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: What are my chances?
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2013, 08:30:04 PM »
Thanks so much!
According to lawschoolpredictor, I have a 3.19 taking into account ALL  college credits ever received! So not as bad as I thought, but still room for improvement.

Citylaw

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 309
    • View Profile
Re: What are my chances?
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2013, 11:48:34 PM »
Miami offers great points and there is only way to know how you will do on the LSAT. That is by taking the LSAT you can read books, predictions, etc bottom line is all you can do is study your but off take the test and come away with a score.

As for your GPA that is in your hands I am sure everyone wants to get a 4.0 or 4.3 and you fully intend to, but odds are you won't. Nothing against you personally, but that is the reality the same way on the first day of law school 100% of students truly believe they will be in the top 10%, which obviously 90% are wrong.

I wish you the best of luck and hope you get a 4.3 and a 180 on the LSAT, but this is unlikely. With that said if you have a 3.1 in a bio major I imagine you will do reasonably well on the LSAT and be capable of being admitted to an ABA law school. It is unlikely to be Harvard, Yale, etc, but you will probably get into an accredited law school if that is what you want.

Believe it or not you can succeed as a lawyer from any ABA school so if being  a lawyer is what you really want you want I believe you can accomplish that goal.

Good luck in college and on the LSAT

IPlaw09

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: What are my chances?
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2013, 09:37:57 AM »
Thanks for your response! When I said 4.0, I meant for this semester only!!

Citylaw

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 309
    • View Profile
Re: What are my chances?
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2013, 12:16:49 AM »
I am aware and I am rooting for you to get a 4.0, but the reality is it probably will not happen. For the same reason I don't have six pack abs it takes a ton of time and you like me are human and likely will not pull off a 4.0 this semester. I hope you prove me wrong, but odds are you go out drinking occasionally while your in college, miss a class or two, get infatuated with a boy/girl, have a fight with a friend, etc a million things could happen and if you haven't been getting 4.0's before it probably won't start now.

Again, I encourage you to prove me wrong and I hope you get a 4.0, but we all face our limitations and I don't want you to think you cannot become a lawyer if you don't get a 4.0 or this semester. Even if you get a 3.1 again and take the LSAT you can still attend law school and become a lawyer.

Again, good luck and I sincerely hope you get a 4.0.

Maintain FL 350

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 683
    • View Profile
Re: What are my chances?
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2013, 01:35:36 PM »
As the above posters have indicated, your entire GPA will be calculated.

All of your info will be sent to an organization called LSAC. They will calculate your GPA based on every college class you've taken, whether at a community college or four year university. When I applied I had a handful of individual summer classes I had taken at a couple of different community colleges, and those were required to be reported and were factored into my GPA.

LSAC will then "weight" your GPA, and it may go up or down a little. I'm not sure what formula they use to adjust your GPA.

As far as the LSAT is concerned, just shoot for the highest possible score. There is no magic GPA/LSAT combo you should strive for. The higher your score, the more options you'll have.

Lastly, as some of the other responses have said, law school admission is primarily a numbers game. People spend a lot of time obsessing over how to present soft factors like grade trend, volunteer experience, or study abroad, whatever. At the end of the day, the vast majority of decisions will be based on numbers, period. With a 3.19 GPA you can still get into many ABA law schools provided that you score well on the LSAT.